Duo Arrested Following Traffic Stop

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.CHAUTAUQUA – Two people were arrested last week following a traffic stop in the Town of Chautauqua.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says Martha Wheeler, 43, of Clymer, was pulled over on Route 430 last Saturday night for an alleged traffic violation.Through investigation, deputies allege Wheeler was operating the vehicle in an intoxicated state.While deputies were performing standardized field sobriety tests on Wheeler, the vehicle’s passenger, Mark Griswold, 58, of Clymer, reportedly got out of the vehicle and confronted deputies. Wheeler was taken into custody and charged with driving while intoxicated per se, driving while intoxicated common law, and inadequate head lamps.Deputies say Griswold followed them to the Sheriff’s Office where he tried to enter the facility.He was additionally arrested and charged with second-degree obstructing governmental administration.Both were released with appearance tickets for the Town of Chautauqua Court.last_img read more

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Senator Borrello, Assemblyman Goodell Advance Plan To Restart New York

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),I would be interested to know how many people in chautauqua county have been tested?,How many have this virus that doesn’t even know they have it? It’s so scary out there ALBANY – With the COVID-19 crisis spiking unemployment in the state, shuttering thousands of  businesses and driving up government budget deficits, Senator George Borrello and Assemblyman Andy Goodell advanced a plan for a phased-in reopening of New York’s economy.The strategy hinges on application of a regionally based assessment model that would determine risk level based on a variety of factors including population density, infection rate and health care capacity. The strategy would also incorporate risk analysis by industry.The geographical template for the plan would be the state’s existing ten Regional Economic Development Council zones (REDC).Each zone would be evaluated based on a multi-tiered risk assessment that could include factors such as infection level, hospitalization utilization, demographic and trend data, such as the increase or decrease in number of active cases. Risk analysis by business sector would also be conducted, based on the four-level model developed by OSHA, with corresponding guidelines for protecting workers safety.“Almost like a horror film, the COVID-19 pandemic invaded our world seemingly overnight, and in so doing, changed life as we know it. While our battle with this insidious virus isn’t over, the strength and unity of New Yorkers in meeting this challenge has been extraordinary, helping us ‘flatten the curve’ and ease infection rates in many of our hardest hit downstate areas,” said Senator George Borrello.“However, an economic crisis has been unfolding alongside our public health emergency. The shuttering of our businesses has resulted in staggering job losses – 1.2 million residents filed for unemployment over the past five weeks, four times the total number of jobs lost during the Great Recession of 2008.”“While New York is one state, we cannot ignore the reality that there is a huge gap between infection rates in New York City and its surrounding counties and rural areas of upstate. For example, in Chautauqua County we currently have four active cases and a substantial drop in the number of people in precautionary quarantine. That is just one example, but it is illustrative of the experience of many rural areas,” said Borrello. “Under the plan we are advancing, economies in regions like this could be safely restarted by following safety protocols, putting people back to work and saving many small businesses from having to close their doors forever.”“Each day that passes puts us in further economic jeopardy. While the governor’s statewide edicts have been done out of an abundance of caution, we cannot restart our economy with the same ‘one-size-fits-all’ process,” said Assemblyman Andy Goodell. “The impact of this pandemic on the various regions of our state has been vastly different and a common-sense plan needs to be tailored to fit the level of risk.”Senator Borrello and Assemblyman Goodell have submitted their plan to New York State Commissioner of Tax and Finance, Michael Schmidt, who will be part of the Cuomo administration’s team working on restarting the economy.last_img read more

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Cheyenne Jackson to Bring Music of the Mad Men Era to L.A.

first_imgWhen you’re throwing a party, you’ve gotta invite Cheyenne Jackson! The Broadway star, along with Emmy winner Jane Lynch and Rebecca Romijn, will bring his Music of the Mad Men Era concert to L.A.’s Walt Disney Concert Hall on April 26. Jackson and his special guests will sing lounge music from the ‘50s and ‘60s accompanied by members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The concert hall is celebrating its 10th anniversary season. Jackson has also performed his popular Music of the Mad Men Era concert at New York City’s Carnegie Hall and the Lincoln and Kennedy Centers in Washington, D.C. The concert is described as centering on “a time when bossa nova was new, the lounges of New York City were hip, and catchy dance music spun on every hi-fi.” Jackson, who jumped from Broadway’s Xanadu and Finian’s Rainbow to TV’s 30 Rock and Glee, will perform hits of the era such as “Feeling Good,” “Luck Be a Lady” and “Sway.” Jackson most recently appeared on Broadway as a porn star in The Performers, with other credits including Aida, Thoroughly Modern Millie and All Shook Up. His upcoming film credits include Six Dance Lessons In Six Weeks and Opening Night. On stage, he’ll appear with Laura Benanti in the Encores! revival of The Most Happy Fella in April. Cheyenne Jackson Laura Benanticenter_img Star Files View Comments Jane Lynchlast_img read more

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The Wayside Motor Inn Begins Off-Broadway

first_img In addition to Kudisch, the cast features Kelly AuCoin, Jon DeVries, Quincy Dunn-Baker, Rebecca Henderson, Jenn Lyon, Lizbeth Mackay, David McElwee, Ismenia Mendes and Will Pullen. View Comments The Wayside Motor Inn Related Shows Outside Boston, 10 people—some strangers, some not—struggle with the circumstances that have brought them to the Wayside Motor Inn. With old grudges and new feuds threatening the travelers’ peace, the play examines the tenuous space between loneliness and connection, and the fragile framework of the American Dream. A.R. Gurney’s The Wayside Motor Inn begins performances off-Broadway on August 12. Lila Neugbauer directs a cast that includes Tony nominee Marc Kudisch. The play will open officially on September 4 at The Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center. As previously announced, the play will run on extension through September 21. Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 5, 2014last_img read more

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Cynthia Nixon Talks Going from Daughter to Mother in The Real Thing

first_img View Comments The Real Thing star Cynthia Nixon has quite the history with the Tom Stoppard play. In 1984, she appeared in the original production as Debbie (while simultaneously starring in Hulyburly two blocks up). Now, she stars in the Roundabout revival as Charlotte (Debbie’s mother). The Tony, Emmy and Grammy winner stopped by The Today Show on November 5 and shared that she’s still “e-mail buddies” with Christine Baranski, who played Charlotte back in 1984. The Sex and the City actress also addressed rumors of a second sequel, saying she’d be “thrilled for the opportunity” if it worked out. But the most shocking news? Nixon does not have a television in her house. However, she does have two Emmy Awards. Hmm. Take a look at the interview below! Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015 The Real Thinglast_img read more

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Hedwig Star Darren Criss on Why Everybody Should do a Drag Show

first_img Related Shows Darren Criss Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015 View Comments Hedwig and the Angry Inch Darren Criss is currently killing it in Hedwig and the Angry Inch and he recently stopped by the ladies of The Talk to chat about stepping into the rock goddess’ heels. The former Glee star thinks that “everybody should do a drag show at some point in their life.” Why? “They make these heels differently than they would your regular nice heels…so I’m not in as much agony as you’d think I’d be.” Despite this, he joked, “I don’t want you to not be impressed by me!” You don’t have to worry about that, Mr. Criss, you’ve already won a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for your performance in the Tony-winning revival! Check out the interview below and then Criss bringing it home at Broadway’s Belasco Theatre through July 19. Star Fileslast_img read more

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Andrew Rannells Reveals His Robert De Niro-Induced Sailor Mouth Syndrome

first_imgBroadway and TV fave Andrew Rannells heads to the big screen beginning September 25 in The Intern, appearing opposite Oscar winners Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro in the Nancy Meyers comedy. When Rannells stopped by The Tonight Show on September 23, he told Jimmy Fallon that the idea of working with De Niro was initially nerve-racking, as it’d be for anyone. Before filming, he received some sage advice from the legendary screenwriter and director. “Don’t be an ass,” Meyers said. “You have to be normal.” Take a look below to find out what Rannells’ version of “normal” was. It involves a lot of four-letter words. A lot. View Commentslast_img

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New Red Maple Boosts Landscape Color

first_imgNEW RED MAPLE IS TURNINGUP THE HEAT in Georgia landscapes, said John Ruter, in photo, a horticulturistwith the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “‘Somerset’will be a rich deep purple that will be great in yards all over the state,”Ruter said. He expects Somerset to be available in nurseries in 1999. (Photocourtesy the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) Georgia homeowners can soon add a bit more of a blaze to the fall colorthat sweeps through the state every year. A Universityof Georgia scientist says a new red maple variety will offer vibrantfall color, even in south Georgia. A new red maple variety called “Somerset” will turn up the heat forfall color in yards all over Georgia. “Somerset is a cross between October Glory, which does well down here,and Autumn Flame,” said John Ruter, a horticulturist at the Tifton, Ga.,campus of the UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences.  “This tree gives us a deeper, I’d say more of a purplish fall coloralmost magenta as opposed to the more intense red usually seen in an OctoberGlory,” Ruter said.  He also likes the unusual silvery leaf backs in Somerset. Whenthe wind blows and the silvery-back leaves flutter around, it’s an attractiveeffect, he said. last_img read more

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12 Evergreen screens

first_imgSometimes an important function of your landscape is to screen off objectionable views or create a space for privacy. Plants used for screening are usually evergreen and 15 to 20 feet tall or taller. They should be tough plants that thrive on neglect once established.Here are some choices: Leyland Cypress. It’s widely available but grows to 120 feet and is susceptible to canker diseases and bagworms in stressful weather. Ice storms can be a problem, too. With its size and disease problems, it’s slowly falling from grace. There are better choices. Burford Holly. A durable plant, it grows to 30 feet with an equal spread. Dwarf Burford Holly. Somewhat smaller, it’s still not really a dwarf, growing to 15-20 feet with an equal spread. Little Gem Magnolia. A dwarf magnolia, it reaches about 20 feet tall and 12 feet wide. It’s a great evergreen screen that tolerates drought. Osmanthus Fragrans. A tough plant for tough sites, it grows 30 feet tall with an equal spread, so it needs lots of room. It has fragrant blooms in November. Yoshino Cryptomeria. A fast-growing evergreen with soft foliage texture, it grows to 40 feet with a spread of 15-20 feet. There have been reports of bot canker and other problems in stressful sites. Foster Holly. This upright, evergreen holly has narrow leaves and brilliant winter berries. It grows up to 30 feet tall and 15 feet wide. Nellie R. Stevens Holly. A tough holly, it grows to 25 feet and 15 feet wide. Loropetalum (white and pink forms). Most cultivars reach 15 to 20 feet at maturity and make a great background plant with showy spring blooms. Small Anise Tree (Illicium parviflorum). This tree grows in sun or shade, but tends to be more compact in the sun. It reaches 15 to 20 feet tall, but requires irrigation during dry periods. It’s a tough, pest-free plant when it’s well-established. Wax Myrtle. This is a great plant in south Georgia, particularly in a moist site. It may have occasional cold damage in north Georgia. It grows 15 to 20 feet tall and wide. Canadian Hemlock. University of Georgia horticulturist Mike Dirr calls it “one of the best evergreens” in his book. It’s a great screen for moist, shady sites, lending a soft texture to the landscape. Thorny Elaeagnus (Elaeagnus pungens). This plant prefers to be used as a background screen plant, since it grows a foot a week in summer. It’s one of the toughest plants going and grows 15 feet high and wide. It’s best left alone, since pruning to maintain a size or shape is futile.Many other evergreens can serve as screens. Pines, for instance, make a fast-growing screen when young, but their lower branches will thin out with age. Pines can be kept as an evergreen hedge with pruning.Bamboo makes a great screen if you select the clumping forms and avoid the more invasive running types.Native red cedar makes a tough screen plant, too. But with a female tree that fruits heavily, seedlings can be a nightmare. Volume XXVII Number 1 Page 12 By Gary L. Wade Georgia Extension Servicelast_img read more

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Packing for plants

first_imgBy Wade HutchesonUniversity of GeorgiaAny move requires packing to ease the transition. Moving plants is no different. But instead of packing stuff, you have to pack the roots for the move.At Berry College in 1992, I was working at Oak Hill, Martha Berry’s home. I had an opportunity to help transplant native azaleas from a national forest back to Berry.What was sold as an opportunity turned out to be a lot like work. Over two days, three of us dug, tugged, wrapped and toted 35 native azaleas out of the woods to the truck. The truck was always uphill. Each azalea had been carefully dug to keep as many roots intact as possible.At the end of the second day, even my hair hurt (I had some back then). But I knew our effort would pay off and was glad to have been a part.Transplanting successThen we got back to Oak Hill and, of course, our prizes had to be replanted. And as my luck would have it, every planting site was uphill. Fortunately for my aching back, there were more hands to help replant.All 35 azaleas survived and put on a spectacular bloom the next spring, mainly because we had packed their bags.We did this during the week after Thanksgiving, which brings me to this point. If you have a tree or shrub in need of transplanting, now is the time. Digging conditions are as good as they’re going to get.Fall is always perfect for transplanting. And due to our unusually heavy rainfall in October, the soil is in good working shape.The key to successThe key to success in transplanting is taking roots — the more the better. I’ve often heard people describe the process as digging a big root ball, which to some means a lot of soil. If there are no roots in that soil, it really doesn’t matter how big the ball is. The roots need to go with it.Start by exploring the soil at least 4 feet away from the trunk. Use a spading fork or other probing tool to help find the major roots.Once you find all the major roots, gently dig, lift and pull them out of the ground. Follow them out as far as you can. And try to leave the big roots intact. Some may need to be pruned to keep the job doable.Then return to the trunk and dig under and around the main trunk at least 2 feet around. You should find roots underneath that will need to be pruned. Rocking and lifting (don’t forget the grunts) will help you identify roots.Keep root mass intactAgain, try to keep as much of the root mass intact as possible. Shave away the soil to help lighten the load.While you’ve worked hard to get to this point, it’s about to get harder. Now the plant needs to be lifted and moved to the new site.You may need to call in a few favors from neighbors. Some will carry the main trunk, and some may be needed to tote major roots. Use a sturdy tarp or heavy burlap to wrap the main root ball with while moving.Try to keep as much soil around the roots as you can, but I’ll trade soil for roots any day.The new planting site should be ready to receive the plant when it arrives, including amending the soil in a large area and not just the planting hole.Incentive to plant properlyAll of your hard work to dig the plant up should be incentive to provide a great new home. Heavily amend an area five times the size of the root ball to be planted. Remove the burlap before planting.(Before you do any of this, think about the new site. Make sure it’s suited for the plant now and in the future. Don’t end up having to move it again.)If all goes well, all that’s left is backfilling soil. You may need to adjust the hole size and shape to accommodate the major roots. Spread them out as they were in the original site. I’ve even dug “ditches” in order to replant some of my transplants’ roots.Water to settle the soil. It shouldn’t need much watering after that until spring. Next summer, it may need weekly watering if rainfall is short.Not moving again is exactly my goal. Plants will travel successfully, however, if you take time to pack their bags first.For more information, contact the University of Georgia Extension Service in your county.last_img read more

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