Defeat Disruption by Embracing Transformation

first_imgDo you feel it? Because you should. I’m talking about the rapid change happening all around us. As Michael Dell has said, “we are on the cusp of some world-changing breakthroughs.” But we’re not there yet. Today, businesses are grappling with this pace of change. New technologies are disrupting businesses in every corner of the world, and companies are facing existential questions about how they will survive in the modern, 21st century economy.Buoyed by ubiquitous technology and lower bars to entry, upstart disruptors are seizing market share from large, historical enterprises across every vertical. The ease of access to technology grants disruptors the operational speed lacked by large, legacy institutions – think of it like a speed boat against a cargo ship. To survive, companies will have to embrace digital disruption’s challenges, and that means they need to transform.In this new era of digitization, Dell EMC has classified four pillars of transformation: Digital, IT, Workforce, and Security. Supported by cloud-based everything, modernized data centers, smarter and more agile workforces, and predictive, proactive security, what we’re really talking about is, effectively, business transformation. That is why today’s IT organization is no longer just a business function, but it is the business — and the largest differentiator for future success.As a result, more and more industry leaders are not only earmarking transformation as a priority, but they are backing it up with resources and commitments.According to a recent, mutual study between Forbes and Dell EMC, 85 percent of global executives plan to spend up to 25 percent of their 2018 enterprise budgets on IT transformation. That is a sea change in the perception of IT and an enormous market opportunity. However, budgets are just budgets. Transformation requires a business commitment and the strategic resources to put ideas into action.Yet, too often, initial momentum hits speed bumps as CIOs and business leaders struggle to define and assign the scope of transformational projects. And the pain is real – 89 percent of senior executives acknowledge barriers prevent CFOs and CIOs from collaborating more closely on transformation. Most often, the debate comes down to one simple question we hear time and time again – “what’s next?”I am proud to say that Dell EMC Consulting answers that all-too-common customer question, having successfully delivered thousands of transformations over the years. We are privileged to serve as strategic advisors, embedding with customers to lend our knowledge and technical expertise along every step of the transformation lifecycle, and help them overcome digital disruption.Transformation is unique to every company, but at its heart is about three simple ingredients: people, process, and technology. Dell EMC Consulting bridges all three, partnering with customers to simultaneously focus on and deliver optimal business outcomes.By embracing the willingness to change, and committing to a transformational project, businesses will achieve a net win and position themselves for future industry leadership. Companies see significantly faster returns on their transformation investments, with a quarter registering paybacks within 12 months, according to the Forbes/Dell EMC survey.Digital disruption is changing the landscape of how businesses operate. Legacy enterprises are facing threats, but the good news is, they have a significant opportunity. Transformation is the strategic lever with which businesses can not only survive in the modern economy, but thrive as leaders and visionaries in their fields. With the right commitment, transformation and defeating disruption are possible.last_img read more

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Wyse ThinOS 8.6 Extends Smooth and Seamless Real-Time Communication on Dell’s Thin Clients

first_imgCompanies all over the world are recognizing virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) with thin clients as a prime solution for some of their most pressing endpoint security and client management challenges. But until recently, it wasn’t the ideal solution for users that conduct real-time audio and video conferences using popular services like Microsoft Skype and Cisco Jabber.With the launch of the latest version of our flagship thin client firmware platform, ThinOS 8.6, Wyse thin clients now offer additional exciting options for these enterprises, thanks to expanded support for high-quality unified communications products.How ThinOS 8.6 Enables Better CommunicationThe challenge that typically comes with using unified communications products on VDI has to do with where the signal is processed. For example, if an employee Skypes with a vendor in another country over your VDI connection, the audio-video stream of their conversation must be processed and unpacked by an intermediary — a virtual machine on your server — before being sent to the employee’s device.This puts a big load on your server’s CPU and causes latency issues, particularly if you’re part of a large organization where 500-plus users may be Skyping or Jabbering at the same time. If both parties are using VDI — say they work for the same company but are based in different offices — this so-called “hairpin effect” is only magnified, as the communications traffic must go through two virtual machines on the way to a target device.Now if the clients can shoulder some of the load by handling the audio/video processing on the endpoint and communicating directly with the other party – you can deliver a better call experience while also reducing the overhead on the servers.  A win-win scenario!  Prior to this release, ThinOS could support Skype offload under Citrix environments using RTME. With 8.6, we’ve now extended our capabilities to include Jabber offload for Citrix environments with Cisco’s jVDI offload module and Skype offload with the VMware Horizon client. This gives ThinOS the ability to offload this workload for the lion’s share of the unified communications products now leading the market using a highly secure and easy to manage client.Not only will end users appreciate the enhanced user experience and excellent voice and audio performance, but IT administrators can lighten the load on their VDI servers in the process and thus make more efficient use of those expensive resources.The Power of Dell Thin Clients for Today’s Challenging User DemandsBy adding these capabilities to our ThinOS clients, customers no longer have to trade off security and manageability benefits against the need to give their end users an excellent unified communications experience.Our customers now have a range of powerful systems that offer ThinOS, including the sleek and compact Wyse 3040 that sports dual 2K monitor support and fits in the palm of your hand or you may choose a newly-introduced Wyse 5070 series platform, sporting the latest generation Intel quad-core CPU’s, true 4K displays, USB 3.1 type C and configurations with up to six monitors!With this release, ThinOS continues to deliver the benefits of a robust and flexible firmware that can adapt to the ever-changing virtualization landscape. Moreover, it offers this support on a secure and manageable endpoint while delivering the best possible user experience for the workforce’s increasingly demanding and complex compute scenarios.Choosing your workplace devices is about achieving the right balance among functionality, security, manageability and cost factors. With the launch of ThinOS 8.6 and its support for high-quality, real-time communications, you now have one more check in the “pro” column for Wyse thin clients and VDI.To learn more, visit www.dell.com/wyselast_img read more

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Moving to the Cloud: Maximizing VMware Investment with Dell EMC Data Protection

first_imgModern business applications require flexibility, enabled by a hybrid cloud that delivers consistent infrastructure and operations. Customers view hybrid clouds as a way to gain flexibility and speed to respond to changing business needs, accelerate innovation, and align costs to business requirements by managing upfront expenses, operational support, and TCO. However, if an organization wants to seamlessly harness the power of the hybrid cloud in an integrated manner, there are several requirements that need to be met. Some of these challenges include: operational inconsistencies, different skillsets & tools, disparate management tools and security controls, inconsistent application SLAs, and incompatible machine formats.Sonali Desai, Product Marketing Manager from VMware, Ken Smith Sr., Product Marketing Manager from VMware and Kenon Ewing, Systems Engineer for Data Protection from Dell EMC, recently presented about moving to the cloud and maximizing customers’ VMware investment with Dell EMC Data Protection.As two powerhouses and leaders in private and public cloud, VMware and Amazon Web Services (AWS) jointly deliver a truly differentiated and compelling engineered solution to customers – the VMware Cloud™ on AWS. Delivered, sold, and supported by VMware and its partners as an on-demand service, VMware Cloud™ on AWS integrates VMware’s entire enterprise-class software-defined data center (SDDC) and optimizes it to run on dedicated elastic Amazon EC2 bare-metal infrastructure that is fully integrated as part of the AWS Cloud. VMware Cloud™ on AWS enables organizations to take advantage of a rich set of benefits with rapid time to value including: consistency and familiarity of VMware technologies, easy workload portability, seamless access to native AWS services, and container and VM support. With the same architecture and operational experience on-premises and in the cloud, IT teams can now accelerate their cloud migration in the simplest, fastest, and lowest risk way with compelling TCO from use of the AWS and VMware hybrid cloud experience.However, there are certain obstacles preventing companies from going to the cloud, requiring companies to maintain their on-premises infrastructure. Data sovereignty issues, including regulatory and privacy requirements, sensitive data located on-premises, custom security standards, and need to prove compliance to auditors prevent organizations from moving to the cloud. Additionally, workload and data proximity issues such as low data latency requirements, workloads with local data processing, and data center workloads that are tightly integrated with backend systems require data to remain on-premises. Even some customers who have moved some of their data into the cloud feel that they do not have the same transparency and control over their data and struggle to keep control over their critical workloads, leverage existing IT environments, and maximize the value of existing talent and processes.To combat these challenges, Dell EMC and VMware co-engineered and delivered the VMware Cloud™ on Dell EMC: cloud infrastructure delivered as a service on-premises, fully managed by VMware. VMware Cloud™ on Dell EMC is built on Dell EMC VxRail infrastructure, and runs on the VMware’s SDDC to handle compute, storage and networking processing. This all-inclusive service also offers a hybrid control plane to provision and monitor resources as well as a monthly subscription-based pricing model. VMware Cloud™ on Dell EMC offers customers support for multiple use cases such as: data center modernization, switch from CapEx to OpEx financial models, and hardware refresh. Another use case is data latency and sovereignty, where the infrastructure stays onsite and can be employed by companies with low data latency requirements, data sovereignty requirements, and data governance and security. Application modernization, including development agility, Kubernetes, and traditional application deployments are all instances where customers can utilize VMware Cloud™ on Dell EMC.Whether customers’ data and applications reside on-premises or are moving into the public cloud, Dell EMC provides cloud protection across the protection portfolio. Dell EMC’s software-defined data management (SDDM) empowers organizations to simplify and automate their data protection. Dell EMC offers data availability, data management, and data analytics on a single SDDM platform, enabling customers to choose their consumption model between multi-dimensional appliances, software, or SaaS.Dell EMC’s SDDM offers integration, which helps drive the value of data protection and enables ease of consumption. Specifically, the native application UI integration streamlines the data protection process with out-of-the-box supported integrations. Infrastructure managers provide tenant control, including governance, compliance, and legacy application protection. There are multiple form factor deployment options that are cost-effective for organizations including software defined, public and private cloud, appliance, and IoT/edge. Additionally, application admins can manage data protection through native interfaces such as vSphere, Oracle and SQL databases, cloud automation interfaces (REST), and Kubernetes.Dell EMC data protection supports four use cases today with our cloud data protection strategy: long-term retention, disaster recovery, backup to the cloud, and hybrid/cloud backup. Dell EMC is a trusted data protection provider, providing comprehensive coverage, flexibility, and powerful architecture, resulting in reduced infrastructure costs and simply powerful data protection.Dell EMC’s data protection automation provides companies with an easy and seamless way to ensure their data is always protected.  Specifically, infrastructure automation is attribute-based inclusion and exclusion, where IT admins can set rules to be used for VM discovery and inclusion, as well as flexible and powerful REGEX matching. It can be auto deployed by either SDDC deployer (auto deploy backup, target and join vSphere), auto deploy proxy data movers, and auto deploy in AWS or other marketplaces. Additionally, Dell EMC offers orchestration automation to move data directly from the VMs to the intended storage target, both on-premises and in the cloud. Dell EMC’s data protection solution is Networker-based, comprised of workflows that enhance the existing catalog with Networker data protection provisioning and job status checking tasks. Using vRealize Orchestrator, Dell EMC’s data protection solution are easily integrated into the VM environment, ensuring simplicity and ease-of-use in a familiar UI environment.The data protection approaches discussed in the webinar provide customers with the performance and simplicity that they need to address the operational and compliance requirements for their hybrid cloud environments. Organizations see hybrid cloud capabilities as a combination of data center, public cloud, and edge infrastructure. Customers benefit when their data center integrates and works seamlessly with their public cloud and edge infrastructure while utilizing their existing teams, skillsets, tools, and processes. With VMware, Dell EMC offers the full spectrum of data protection solutions for any cloud environment. Learn more.Additional Resources:Watch an on-demand recording of the webinarLearn about Moving Disaster Recovery to the Cloud – When Does it Make Sense?Learn how Dell EMC and VMware Simplify, Automate, and Protect your OrganizationLearn more about Dell EMC VxRail Hyperconverged Infrastructurelast_img read more

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Professor teaches last course at ND

first_imgMarketing professor John Weber, nicknamed “Weebs,” said he lives by three rules — have fun, be nice to everyone and think about turtles once in a while. Weber taught his last class at Notre Dame Wednesday after 42 years as a member of the faculty, but said the “Turtle Club,” created by his seven grandchildren, will continue to grow. Weber invites his students and friends to join the club, even giving them laminated membership cards and a club certificate that lists the three rules, Weber said. “The silly stuff like that is reflective of my years here because I like to have a lot of fun and I like to be close to students,” Weber said. “That is the hallmark of my time here.” Weber built long-lasting friendships with many Notre Dame undergraduates during his time as a professor, a Hall Fellow in Morrissey Hall and the moderator of the Marketing Club. “I have always been very social,” Weber said. “From the start, the most enjoyable part of teaching for me has been interfacing with the students.” Weber began teaching at the University in 1969. He arrived at Notre Dame at the same time as Mendoza’s first copy machine. “There were only 40 faculty members in the College of Business at that time,” Weber said. Notre Dame began to expand and build a reputation as a research university, and Mendoza currently employs almost 200 faculty members, Weber said. “The research expectations in the College of Business have just gone through the roof. I feel very concerned about the younger faculty because it is very difficult to achieve tenure now,” Weber said. “That relates back to interfacing with students. It is difficult for young faculty today to set aside time for undergraduate students.” Weber saw positive changes in the University as well. “Admitting women allowed us to keep up the quality of our students and round out the male part of our student body from a maturity view,” Weber said. “Having women as an integral part of all dimensions of campus life better prepares all our students for the real world, a world where women are increasingly playing leadership roles.” Weber said leadership in the College of Business led the University to its current ranking as the No. 1 school for undergraduate business in the nation. “While some colleges still have relatively high student to faculty ratios, we have added more faculty,” Weber said. “We are willing to bring in the big guns to help improve our standing among national and international universities.” Campus facilities and technology also allowed students to learn more, Weber said. Senior Tom Smith signed up for Weber’s Business to Business marketing course because of recommendations from friends. “I heard he was a great professor even though this was an 8 a.m. course. I honestly never thought I would make it to every 8 a.m. class, but I can successfully say I did it,” Smith said. “And I stayed awake every day.” Smith said Weber constantly reached out to his class and even hosted a cookout for them in his home. “He visibly cares about his students,” Smith said. “Of all the teachers I have had here, he has done the most to connect to his students.” In 2001, Weber was made an honorary member of the Class of 1981 and remains close with students from that class. Dan Tarullo, a 1981 graduate, lived in Morrissey Hall while Weber was a Hall Fellow and is one of almost 30 alumni who participate in the “Weeb’s Open,” an annual golf tournament and informal reunion in late July. Over 15 members of this group hosted a surprise dinner for Weber Tuesday evening and visited his class Wednesday morning. “This group here has been together over 30 years and we come back together every year because of this man,” Tarullo said. The group shared stories about Thursday night bowling, cookouts and golf scrambles with Weber’s current students. They recounted tales of Weber when he stole bowling shoes and jumped into a pond at a local golf course in a victory celebration. Weber said the long-standing friendships he formed with students are the most valuable product of his time at Notre Dame. “It all starts with one-on-one personal relationships with students. The first rule of the Turtle Club is to have fun,” Weber said. “You have to have fun.”last_img read more

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Keenan Revue set for Stepan

first_imgThe Keenan Revue will be held in the Stepan Center on Feb. 10 – 12, marking its return to Notre Dame’s campus from its previous venue, Saint Mary’s O’Laughlin Auditorium. “Last year, we found out through The Observer that we couldn’t use the venue anymore,” producer Chase Riddle, a junior, said. “They said it wasn’t keeping with their mission statement. We went on a wild goose chase to find something comparable [in size].” Riddle said they searched for a place starting immediately after last year’s Revue, looking at options on and off campus. They finalized the use of the Stepan Center this fall. “We wanted to bring it back to Notre Dame,” director Grayson Duren, a junior, said. Riddle said this year’s Revue is titled “Keenan Revue: Too Big For Saint Mary’s,” and ticket distribution begins today at 4 p.m. at the gate three of the Joyce Center. Each student can bring two student IDs and get two tickets per student ID, Burley said. There will be 1,300 tickets per show, with three showings. Keenan residents will also receive tickets. Riddle said the Revue has been growing less offensive. “What surprises me is we were going into past scripts, and they were vulgar,” he said. “In our two years [working with the Revue], it’s been much cleaner.” Duren said the jokes have become more clever. “We’ve been moving away from vulgarity because they’ve been censoring skits,” Nick Burley, Keenan Hall co-president and junior, said. “…The best thing you can do is find a balance between the two. Witty skits are just okay. Vulgar ones are hit or miss. Skits that strike the balance are the best.” Duren said the Revue has 26 to 28 segments, including two speeches, four songs performed by the band and 20 to 22 skits. Keenan residents create the skits and bring them to the Revue staff on tryout days, Duren said. After a few initial rounds, the remaining skits are brought before Keenan rector Fr. Dan Nolan. “If it’s someone’s idea, they’ll be in [the skit],” Burley said. “It’s neat. You usually see a skit all the way through the creative process to onstage.” The skits are put into a script, which is then censored by the rector, Riddle said. “[In 2009] there was one skit cut,” Riddle said. “No full skits were cut this year.” The musicians are all Keenan residents too. “There is a good array of music this year,” Riddle said. “Everyone is going to be happy about the two ‘exotic dancer’ songs.” The participants will be rehearsing through the week, Riddle said. Duren said the dancers take collections during the Revue for Keenan’s Hall Scholarship, which the rector distributes the funds to hall residents. Alumni donations fund approximately 80 percent of the Revue, which cannot be paid for completely by Student Activities Office funding, Riddle said.last_img read more

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Group suggests changes to IDs

first_imgStudent Senate discussed possible changes to University identification cards at its meeting Wednesday. The group also passed resolutions concerning discriminatory harassment and campus safety. Robert Casarez, senior business analyst for the Office of Auxiliary Operations, said the University is considering expanding the services offered by identification cards. Senators suggested improvements such as accepting Domer Dollars for food sold in residence halls, creating the capability to scan cards through wallets and enabling students to distribute their dining hall meals more freely instead of restricting them to swiping into each meal only once. Casarez said other community members suggested making identification cards more aesthetically pleasing and using them to record attendance at events. Casarez also said his office plans to facilitate the use of Domer Dollars off campus, beginning in the fall. He said this arrangement would initially apply to one or two vendors but could expand if it proves profitable for the merchants and the University. “It doesn’t have to be limited to just food at Eddy Street Commons … It could be Martin’s, it could be Walmart, it could be Meijer,” he said. Senate passed a resolution requesting the University “directly and promptly respond to the evidence of harassment presented at the March 5 town hall meeting and publicly condemn harassment of any kind.”   The resolution also asked the Office of Student Affairs and Office of Institutional Equity to compile a task force to investigate Notre Dame’s discrimination policies and the University’s efforts to address diversity. Another resolution requested the University investigate and improve the perception of safety on campus, possibly by increasing lighting and video surveillance on Mod Quad, God Quad, D2 and D6 parking lots, and the outskirts of campus. The group also passed a resolution implementing the Co-Campus Council as a permanent entity. Kelsey Eckenrode, director of community relations for student government, said representatives from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s, Holy Cross College, Indiana University South Bend and Ivy Tech Community College participate in the Council. “It’s just a good way to get rid of the ‘everybody hates Notre Dame, slash, Notre Dame thinks they’re better than everyone’ [perception],” she said. “It builds community, and I’m hoping we could implement this Co-Campus Council as a permanent entity instead of just a one-year trial run.” Senate also passed a resolution to add the position of Campus Ministry Representative to student government’s executive board. The group approved freshman Maggie Wilmouth to serve as student body secretary. The previously approved secretary had to resign due to scheduling conflicts.last_img read more

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Friends with Sisters strengthens relationships among students, sisters

first_imgFriends with Sisters, a program of campus ministry at Saint Mary’s, was founded in 1976 and has remained popular among sisters and students alike for nearly 50 years.The connection between Saint Mary’s and the Sisters of the Holy Cross is an invaluable experience, senior Addie Bobosky said in an email. Bobosky joined Friends with Sisters her freshman year and has remained an active member ever since. Students are invited to apply to the club, and if selected, are partnered with a Holy Cross sister, with whom they are able to communicate and socialize with in organized events and casual settings. In a typical year, group events range from costume parties to bingo.“I am so thankful to be a part of the club because of the friendships,” Bobosky said. “My sister, Sr. Claire Alfred, has been such a blessing in my life. I truly enjoy being with her and learning about her life. Pre-Covid, we would go to church together, eat Sunday brunch together and participate in all the club events together.”For Bobosky, the experience became even more special when her sister Julia, a sophomore, joined during her first year at the College. “It has been such a blessing going to events together as well as bonding with both of our convent sisters,” Addie Bobosky said.“I’m honored to have such an amazing opportunity to have a sister from Sisters of Holy Cross,” Julia Bobosky said. “Being able to have a personal relationship, learning from them, sharing their life stories as well as yours, our memories — I will never forget.”Julia Bobosky spoke to the role that her sister, Judy Murphy, played in her transition to college and battle with homesickness. “She would always tell me how loved I am, and if I need anything to always come to her,” she said. “She always thinks of others before herself, and I loved having the opportunity in my life to learn from such a role model.”When students were sent home over spring break, the Bobosky sisters used the opportunity to write over 50 letters to every sister with words of encouragement and prayer to let them know they were thinking of them. Due to the ongoing pandemic and added restrictions at the convent, students have not been able to visit the sisters this semester which has impinged upon the normal operations of the group. Letter writing has become a staple of the club’s activities this fall to maintain contact and stay in touch with the sisters. Club president, senior Allison Schibi, organized an upcoming Halloween parade in which students can dress up in costumes and walk around the convent for the sisters to see.  “I highly recommend this club to anyone looking for a lifelong friendship with a Holy Cross sister. I promise that you will learn so much from their experiences,” Addie Bobosky said.  Tags: Campus Ministry, Friends with Sisters, Sisters of the Holy Crosslast_img read more

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Duo Arrested Following Traffic Stop

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.CHAUTAUQUA – Two people were arrested last week following a traffic stop in the Town of Chautauqua.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says Martha Wheeler, 43, of Clymer, was pulled over on Route 430 last Saturday night for an alleged traffic violation.Through investigation, deputies allege Wheeler was operating the vehicle in an intoxicated state.While deputies were performing standardized field sobriety tests on Wheeler, the vehicle’s passenger, Mark Griswold, 58, of Clymer, reportedly got out of the vehicle and confronted deputies. Wheeler was taken into custody and charged with driving while intoxicated per se, driving while intoxicated common law, and inadequate head lamps.Deputies say Griswold followed them to the Sheriff’s Office where he tried to enter the facility.He was additionally arrested and charged with second-degree obstructing governmental administration.Both were released with appearance tickets for the Town of Chautauqua Court.last_img read more

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Senator Borrello, Assemblyman Goodell Advance Plan To Restart New York

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),I would be interested to know how many people in chautauqua county have been tested?,How many have this virus that doesn’t even know they have it? It’s so scary out there ALBANY – With the COVID-19 crisis spiking unemployment in the state, shuttering thousands of  businesses and driving up government budget deficits, Senator George Borrello and Assemblyman Andy Goodell advanced a plan for a phased-in reopening of New York’s economy.The strategy hinges on application of a regionally based assessment model that would determine risk level based on a variety of factors including population density, infection rate and health care capacity. The strategy would also incorporate risk analysis by industry.The geographical template for the plan would be the state’s existing ten Regional Economic Development Council zones (REDC).Each zone would be evaluated based on a multi-tiered risk assessment that could include factors such as infection level, hospitalization utilization, demographic and trend data, such as the increase or decrease in number of active cases. Risk analysis by business sector would also be conducted, based on the four-level model developed by OSHA, with corresponding guidelines for protecting workers safety.“Almost like a horror film, the COVID-19 pandemic invaded our world seemingly overnight, and in so doing, changed life as we know it. While our battle with this insidious virus isn’t over, the strength and unity of New Yorkers in meeting this challenge has been extraordinary, helping us ‘flatten the curve’ and ease infection rates in many of our hardest hit downstate areas,” said Senator George Borrello.“However, an economic crisis has been unfolding alongside our public health emergency. The shuttering of our businesses has resulted in staggering job losses – 1.2 million residents filed for unemployment over the past five weeks, four times the total number of jobs lost during the Great Recession of 2008.”“While New York is one state, we cannot ignore the reality that there is a huge gap between infection rates in New York City and its surrounding counties and rural areas of upstate. For example, in Chautauqua County we currently have four active cases and a substantial drop in the number of people in precautionary quarantine. That is just one example, but it is illustrative of the experience of many rural areas,” said Borrello. “Under the plan we are advancing, economies in regions like this could be safely restarted by following safety protocols, putting people back to work and saving many small businesses from having to close their doors forever.”“Each day that passes puts us in further economic jeopardy. While the governor’s statewide edicts have been done out of an abundance of caution, we cannot restart our economy with the same ‘one-size-fits-all’ process,” said Assemblyman Andy Goodell. “The impact of this pandemic on the various regions of our state has been vastly different and a common-sense plan needs to be tailored to fit the level of risk.”Senator Borrello and Assemblyman Goodell have submitted their plan to New York State Commissioner of Tax and Finance, Michael Schmidt, who will be part of the Cuomo administration’s team working on restarting the economy.last_img read more

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Cheyenne Jackson to Bring Music of the Mad Men Era to L.A.

first_imgWhen you’re throwing a party, you’ve gotta invite Cheyenne Jackson! The Broadway star, along with Emmy winner Jane Lynch and Rebecca Romijn, will bring his Music of the Mad Men Era concert to L.A.’s Walt Disney Concert Hall on April 26. Jackson and his special guests will sing lounge music from the ‘50s and ‘60s accompanied by members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The concert hall is celebrating its 10th anniversary season. Jackson has also performed his popular Music of the Mad Men Era concert at New York City’s Carnegie Hall and the Lincoln and Kennedy Centers in Washington, D.C. The concert is described as centering on “a time when bossa nova was new, the lounges of New York City were hip, and catchy dance music spun on every hi-fi.” Jackson, who jumped from Broadway’s Xanadu and Finian’s Rainbow to TV’s 30 Rock and Glee, will perform hits of the era such as “Feeling Good,” “Luck Be a Lady” and “Sway.” Jackson most recently appeared on Broadway as a porn star in The Performers, with other credits including Aida, Thoroughly Modern Millie and All Shook Up. His upcoming film credits include Six Dance Lessons In Six Weeks and Opening Night. On stage, he’ll appear with Laura Benanti in the Encores! revival of The Most Happy Fella in April. Cheyenne Jackson Laura Benanticenter_img Star Files View Comments Jane Lynchlast_img read more

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