9 months agoNapoli goalscorer Fabian Ruiz: Coppa Italia important for fans

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Napoli goalscorer Fabian Ruiz: Coppa Italia important for fansby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNapoli goalscorer Fabian Ruiz was delighted with victory over Coppa Italia opponents Sassuolo.He scored the second goal in a 2-0 victory, setting up a quarter-final date with Milan.“We know this is an important competition for Napoli, that this was a difficult game, but we did well,” the Spaniard told Rai Sport.“Now we have to focus on Sunday and the return of Serie A. Lazio are close to us and very ambitious, but we are on home turf and want to make the most of it.“The Coach has faith in me, so do my teammates and I have to keep working hard to earn my place.” last_img

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Minor raped in Salt Lake

first_imgKolkata: A minor girl was allegedly raped at Naobhanga in Salt Lake on Tuesday morning.The accused persons were arrested after her family members lodged a complaint at the Bidhannagar South Police Station. According to the police, the accused was a neighbour of the victim. On Tuesday, he allegedly took the girl to a house near a sweet shop in Naobhanga and raped her. He also threatened her with dire consequences if she disclosed anything about him. After returning home, the victim fell sick and narrated the incident to her family. Also Read – City bids adieu to Goddess DurgaIn another incident, a young woman was allegedly raped at gunpoint at Kultali in South 24-Parganas. According to her statement, on June 18, when she was going home from her in law’s house in Canning area, she met a youth identified as Basudeb Naskar who was known to her. Naskar offered to drop her home. After few minutes, he took her to a lonely place in Kultalai area and raped her at gunpoint. When she fell unconscious Naskar fled. Later, when she regained consciousness, she went home and informed her family members about the incident. It is alleged that when she along with her family members went to Canning police station to lodge a complaint they were asked to go to Kultali police station. Later, a case was lodged at the Kultali police station but Naskar was not arrested till Tuesday.last_img read more

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UN health agency asks for public suggestions on curbing harmful alcohol use

During its World Health Assembly in May, nations asked WHO to create a global strategy to combat destructive alcohol use, and the Internet discussion will run from 3 to 31 October.“This web-based public hearing is broad and inclusive and will provide and opportunity for everyone, including the public, to present their views on effective strategies to reduce the burden resulting the harmful use of alcohol,” said Ala Alwan, Assistant Director-General of WHO’s Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health Cluster.Submissions can be made to the WHO website in all of the six official UN languages, and will form the documentation to be discussed during upcoming separate meetings with alcohol industry representatives, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), professionals and Member States.Benedetto Saraceno, Director of the agency’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, called for maximum participation in the online hearing.“We are particularly interested in getting views on integrated approaches that can protect at-risk populations, young people and those affected by harmful drinking by others,” he said. 2 October 2008With more than two million people dying from alcohol-related causes annually, the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) is launching a month-long online forum to give a voice to the public on how to curb harmful consumption. read more

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As Melania Trump puts focus on highend luxury market grows

FILE – In this Friday, May 26, 2017 file photo, US first lady Melania Trump steps out of a car as she arrives at Chierici Palace, part of a visit of the G7 first ladies in Catania, Italy. Trump’s first outing in the Sicilian sunshine was in a colorful floral applique jacket by Dolce & Gabbana that comes off the rack at $51,000. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, File) As Melania Trump puts focus on high-end luxury, market grows MILAN – U.S. First Lady Melania Trump opened a window onto the luxury world over the weekend when she wore a $51,000 designer jacket to a lunch on the sidelines of a global summit in Sicily.While the revelation sent many into sticker shock, the reality is that those kinds of prices belong to the most exclusive high end of haute couture that operate at the highest level of hand craftsmanship, accessible only to the very few.“For the brands, they need to do it, to have the attention and to keep the research and development high,” said Claudia D’Arpizio, a senior partner at Bain & Company consulting. “There is not a real public for that. I would say very few women in the world are buying haute couture. While for the rest, I think people are spending money, but they are more cautious about value.”A floral applique jacket like the one Mrs. Trump purchased for the G-7 outing, for example, would require many seamstress hours of hand embroidery. Dolce&Gabbana did not release any details of the materials, but Stefano Gabbana celebrated its high-profile outing on Instagram.Looking beyond the uppermost tiers of indulgence, a new Bain study shows that sales of global luxury goods levelled off last year from a period Chinese-fueled euphoria. They are expected, however, to grow again this year, despite uncertainty generated by the recent Manchester attack and changing U.S. travel policies.Sales of luxury apparel, jewelry, accessories and beauty products last year totalled 249 billion euros ($280 billion), compared with 251 billion euros in 2015. They are expected to grow by 2 per cent to 4 per cent this year.The forecasts reflect improved confidence in Europe, which suffered declines after terror attacks in Paris, and solid performance in China. They will offset a slowdown the United States due largely to the strong dollar and uncertainty over travel policy.“Local customers are buying again, both in Europe and China,” D’Arpizio said.While sales in Paris are back to pre-attack levels, D’Arpizio said new uncertainties can affect the outlook. In Europe, that includes the impact from the more recent terror attack in Manchester. And in the United States, that includes the new administration’s moves to impose a travel ban on some Muslim nations and even widen the ban on laptops in the carry-on luggage on inbound overseas flights, which she dubbed the “Trump Slump.”“These restrictions are not helping when planning holiday trips,” she said.While the impact on luxury sales of Trump’s travel policies have yet to be calculated, D’Arpizio said the strong dollar is hurting sales to tourists to the United States, in particular from China, Argentina and Brazil.For 2017, European sales are expected to increase 7 per cent to 9 per cent, while formerly double-digit China is expected to grow by a more moderate 6 per cent to 8 per cent. A slight contraction is forecast for the Americas and Japan.The eye-popping price of Melania Trump’s floral applique jacket goes against overall pricing trends in the luxury world.D’Arpizio said high-end consumers are more price conscious than ever, and they won’t accept an annual price increase for the same products. Innovation is key.“They are happy to pay for newness or innovation or extreme quality that is durable but not for the same product that is inflated 6 per cent every season,” she said. by Colleen Barry, The Associated Press Posted May 29, 2017 9:43 am MDT Last Updated May 29, 2017 at 11:00 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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Security Council condemns terrorist attack against African Union mission in Somalia

“The members of the Security Council reaffirmed that terrorism in all its forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security,” said a statement issued to the press.The Council underlined the need to bring perpetrators, organizers, financiers and sponsors of these reprehensible acts of terrorism to justice.The attack reportedly killed and injured a number of soldiers belonging to the mission, known as AMISOM.The Council underscored its full support to AMISOM in delivering their mandate to reduce the threat posed by the terrorist group Al-Shabaab and armed opposition groups in Somalia, and paid tribute to all international actors working to bring peace and stability in Somalia.

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OK Should The Cavs Start To Worry Now

By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Embed Code Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On Monday’s show (April 16, 2018), Neil, Kyle and Chris recap the first games of the NBA playoffs. They focus on the weekend’s big storylines: The Pacers trounced the Cavs in Cleveland, the Blazers had no answer for Anthony Davis, and the Sixers looked like real contenders.Here are links to what the podcast discussed this week:Keep an eye on FiveThirtyEight’s NBA predictions, updated after every game.Chris wrote about how Ben Simmons is outsmarting his defenders.

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US court takes up appeal on Gitmo forcefeeding

first_imgA US APPEALS court heard arguments today in the case of three Guantanamo detainees who want to ban force-feeding for hunger strikers, a practice they say is “inhumane.”Their lawyer Jon Eisenberg argued that authorities at the controversial “war on terror” prison in Cuba were force-feeding the detainees “before their life is at risk.”Life and deathThe US government, represented by Daniel Lenerz, argued that “enteral feeding is used only when medically necessary to protect life and health.”The legal challenge was brought on behalf of detainees Ahmed Belbasha, Shaker Aamer, and Abu Wa’el Dhiab. A fourth plaintiff, Algerian Nabil Hadjarab, has since been sent home.Currently, 15 detainees at Guantanamo Bay are on a hunger strike that began on February 6 and at its peak involved 106 out of 164 detainees.Eisenberg argued that the practice of force-feeding hunger strikers is “inhumane, a violation of international law and a violation of medical ethics.”In July, a federal judge declared that feeding inmates by nasal tubes, or “enteral feeding,” constituted “torture” but said she did not have the jurisdiction to put an end to the practice.“Your complaint is that force feeding is premature?” one of the three appeals judges, David Tatel, asked Eisenberg.He then asked what should happen when the hunger strike reached a life-threatening level, saying he was trying to understand whether the practice is inherently unconstitutional.Constitutional rightEisenberg argued that “there’s a constitutional right to refuse medical treatment,” even when that decision “can conduct to death.” He also maintained that federal courts have jurisdiction over “conditions of confinement so extreme.”But Lenerz said the lower court’s ruling that federal courts did not have jurisdiction should stand, contending that the constitutional right to contest detention conditions didn’t apply to this practice.He also emphasised that the prison at Guantanamo Bay is:a military facility, it’s not a regular facility, it’s law of war detainees, these are not regular detainees.The strike began as a spontaneous reaction to a cell sweep in which guards allegedly mishandled copies of the Koran.It soon grew into a mass protest against the legal limbo in which detainees are held at the prison.- © AFP, 2013Read: 150 doctors write to Obama offering services to Guantánamo hunger strikers>last_img read more

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SYRIZA and police clash over photos

first_imgThe police on Wednesday accused SYRIZA of trying to usurp authority and following tactics adopted by Golden Dawn after several of its MPs took photos and videos of undercover officers ahead of an anti-austerity rally in Athens on Tuesday. The material was uploaded on the Left.gr website after eight SYRIZA deputies approached the undercover officers to ask them questions about their actions. The Public Order Ministry described this as similar “fascist tactics to the other extreme [party]” in reference to Golden Dawn, which has taken to checking people’s identification cards. The ministry accused SYRIZA of trying to expose the identity of the policemen, thereby aiding anti-establishment activists. The undercover officers whose identity was revealed filed suits, claiming their privacy rights had been breached. The electronic crimes squad gathered information which was due to be sent to the first instance prosecutor’s office on Wednesday. SYRIZA said it was trying to expose the “unconstitutional” tactic of pre-emptive detentions that the police force often adopts ahead of protests. It added that the force also publishes photos of suspects at such rallies. Source: Kathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Visa Europe concentré sur les virements entre mobiles

first_imgVisa Europe concentré sur les virements entre mobilesIl n’y a pas que le NFC dans les transactions avec mobiles. Visa a présenté un système permettant d’envoyer de l’argent entre smartphones, via un simple numéro de mobile.Le salon Cartes 2011 se tient en ce moment à Paris. Cet événement regroupe les différents acteurs de la sécurité et des transactions électroniques du monde. C’est à cette occasion que la société Visa a présenté un nouveau système de virements entre smartphones selon iTespresso. Sa technologie ne se base pas sur le système NFC, révolutionnaire mais encore trop peu présent dans nos appareils mais avec des comptes utilisateurs préalablement enregistrés.Il s’agit d’une application qui tourne pour le moment uniquement sur Android (le produit est en phase de test). Grâce à elle, vous pouvez transférer des fonds en entrant simplement le numéro de téléphone de la personne à qui vous souhaitez envoyer de l’argent, même si elle n’a pas de compte dédié ou l’application sur son téléphone. Le service est donc en test uniquement en Grande Bretagne mais Visa Europe, à l’origine du projet, indique “qu’il est prévu qu’elle soit étendue à d’autres pays et devises dans un second temps”. Le système se place dans la veine des PayPal ou Google Wallet mais avec une simplicité redoutable, se basant sur le nombre de personnes possédant une carte bleue Visa. L’avenir des transactions passera peut-être par le mobile.Le 30 novembre 2011 à 19:30 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Search for San Diego Police Departments next police chief

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman, San Diego Police Department FacebookTwitter January 16, 2018 Steve Bosh Steve Bosh, Posted: January 16, 2018center_img Updated: 10:12 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The process for selecting San Diego’s next police chief has come under fire by some community groups who say there needs to be more than an advisory role for the public in choosing a new chief.Eighteen community leaders and six other members from city boards and commissions make up the advisory group that’s interviewing the candidates.Their information will then go to the search firm hired to oversee the process.Critics of the process see a lack of transparency because the members of the advisory panel will remain secret and the public will not have a chance to question the three finalists for the job.This is about the public’s safety and two audits of the police department, one by the Justice Department and one by San Diego State, found flaws in how the department has handled internal problems, citizen complaints and problematic behavior such as racial profiling. Critics of the process want to confront the finalists on these concerns and they want to know the identity of the panel members.“If they are members of the community or not, and having that open process everybody can see and know that there’s real transparency, you know it leaves us in the dark, and therefore we can’t trust the process,” said Cornelius Bowser of Alliance San Diego.The Mayor’s Office said naming the panelists would open the process up to lobbying by special interest groups.There have been several community forums for public input and an online survey. But again, these are advisory. The process follows the city charter, the mayor appoints a chief with approval from the council. Councilmember Chris Cate said calling it a secret panel is unfortunate.“What I do appreciate though is that the city and the mayor’s office is gonna be holding community hearings to hear feedback, the online survey will allow people to provide feedback,” said Chris Cate back in October of last year.Becky Hunt of one of those critics.“I would like to see one that there is no more racial profiling. That bothers me,” Hunt said.Tony Thomas suggests the ultimate public input is a vote of the people.“There are certain things that they don’t let us vote on,” Thomas said.In his state of the city address, Mayor Faulconer spent a few minutes on the city’s new contract with the cops to keep the department competitive in recruiting and retaining officers.Mayor Faulconer didn’t mention the controversy over the search for a new chief except to say, “Our next police chief will help to keep our city one of the safest cities in the nation.”The process has three stages: The selection of the 24-panel members, reducing the candidates to three and the mayor interviewing the three finalists. The process outlined by the mayor’s office says they are in phase three. Search for San Diego Police Department’s next police chieflast_img read more

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Lisa Gersh Named COO and President of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia

first_imgGersh is also expected to join the board of directors in the “near future”. In addition to Gersh’s hire, Blackstone Advisory Partners have been retained to “review and respond” to companies interested in investing and/or partnering with MSLO, as well as “exploring other opportunities”, according to a company release. Of this decision, Martha Stewart says, “As the founder and largest stockholder, I fully support this initiative to take our business and iconic brand to the next level.” In 2009, Wenda Harris Millard stepped down from her role as co-CEO, where she worked in tandem with Robin Marino. Until Gersh, there was no replacement named. Lisa Gersh has been tapped as president and chief operating officer of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia (MSLO), effective June 6.Gersh will report to Charles Koppelman, executive chairman and principal executive officer, and will be in charge of day-to-day business operations. A succession plan has also been put in place, with Gersh being integrated into the company and set to become CEO within 12-20 months of her hire.center_img MSLO also announced today that Martha Stewart herself is slated to rejoin the board of directors in the third quarter of 2011. After being convicted in 2004 and a settlement of charges with the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2006, Stewart was barred from being a director or officer in the public company for five years. In other MSLO news, Patsy Pollack has been named senior executive vice president, in charge of lead merchandising business, succeeding Marino. Pollack has been with the company since 2008; before this, she was CEO of Donna Karan Home. In the first quarter of 2011, MSLO publishing revenue was up to $34.66 million from $31.36 in the first quarter of 2010. However, broadcasting fell for to $7.76 million in first quarter 2011 from $12.09 million in first quarter 2010.Update – On May 25, the day Gersh’s hire was announced, MSLO stock was up by 90 cents (+23 percent) to $4.67 per share. Currently, MSLO stock is down 1.5 percent, at $4.60 per share.last_img read more

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FDA OKs engineered salmon lawmakers seek mandatory labels

first_imgPhoto: AquaBounty TechnologiesIt’s the announcement the Alaskan salmon industry has long feared: The FDA this morning approved an application for genetically engineered salmon, declaring the product as safe to eat as natural salmon. Critics, including Alaska’s congressional delegation, are considering their next steps.Download AudioIt’s primarily an Atlantic salmon, but it has genes from a Chinook and a bottom-dweller to make it grow extra fast on less food. It’s called AquAdvantage, and it’s the first genetically altered animal approved for human consumption in the United States. Alaska’s industry and congressional delegation call it “frankenfish.” Sen. Lisa Murkowski says she’s livid the FDA calls it food.“It’s not going to be served at my dinner table, ever,” she said. “And boy oh boy, I’m going to do everything that I can to make sure that restaurants don’t serve it, that stores don’t have it sold in their store.”Murkowski, Sen. Dan Sullivan and Congressman Don Young say they will try to pass a bill requiring a label on AquAdvantage, identifying it as genetically engineered. Farm-state lawmakers, though, have fiercely opposed any such a labeling requirement, fearing the next step would be mandatory labeling of genetically engineered crops.  The FDA has issued guidance for optional labeling of the new fish. Murkowski scoffs.“You think that the aquAdvantage people are going to  … volunteer to put a label on that says ‘this is fake, this is genetically engineered, this is a Frankenfish’?” she said.  “No they’re not going to.”The company, Massachusetts-based AquaBounty Technologies, declined an interview request. It plans to produce the altered eggs on Prince Edward Island, Canada, and raise them in Panama, in covered, land-based tanks. The FDA has so far restricted them to those locations. But in a written statement reacting to the news, the company suggested it hopes the fish will eventually be produced in the U.S., too.“The U.S. currently imports over 90% of all the seafood, and more specifically over 95% of the Atlantic salmon, it consumes,” the company said. “AquAdvantage Salmon will offer the opportunity for an economically viable domestic aquaculture industry while providing consumers a fresh and delicious product.”The company insists its fish will never see ocean and, in any case, are incapable of reproduction. Opponents in Alaska, though, say the fish could escape and damage wild stocks.The critics have an ally in national environmental groups.“We will continue both educating consumers as well as restaurants and grocery retailers,” says Dana Perls, food and technology campaigner for Friends of the Earth. The group has worked for years to get consumers and businesses to reject AquAdvantage.“Already there’s more than 60 grocery store chains including Safeway and Kroger, Target, Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods,.that have already said they will not sell the GMO salmon, regardless of the FDA approval.”She says Friends of the Earth will call on the Obama Administration to rescind the decision and will also challenge the process the FDA used.In an email, AquaBounty said it’s too early to discuss how fish will appear on the market. Since farmed salmon grabbed substantial market share in the 1990s, Alaska has spent millions to pitch its salmon as  wild and healthy. Alexa Tonkovich, executive director of the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, says ASMI can draw on that experience to meet the challenge of engineered fish, too.“ASMI will just continue to promote wild natural and sustainable seafood and continue to try to differentiate ourselves in the market place,” she said.One thing ASMI won’t do, she says, is bash the new fish. Tonkovich says their policy is not to speak ill of the competition.last_img read more

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Smart policingApp to be introduced by SP Siddharth Kaushal

first_imgOngole: Prakasam District SP Siddharth Kaushal held a meeting with the software developers, IT core team members, PCR, command and control staff in his office in Ongole on Friday to prepare a list of features for the smart policing app. In the meeting, he discussed with the software developers Rakesh and Nagendra and other staff that the application should be designed using the crime analysis reports to step up vigil in the crime hotspots and reduce crime considerably. He shared his ideas to the developers and advised that the movement of Bluecolts and Rakshak vehicles would be monitored and deployed various places in such a way where the crime rate is high. SB-II CI N Srikanth Babu, IT core team, PCR, command and control room SIs and other staff also participated in the meeting.last_img read more

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Modeling the miniscule Highresolution design of nanoscale biomolecules

first_img The research team – Adelene Y. L. Sim in the Department of Applied Physics, and Prof. Michael Levitt and Dr. Peter Minary in the Department of Structural Biology – faced a range of challenges in devising their unique algorithm. Speaking with PhysOrg, Minary and Sim describe those challenges. “Reducing dimensionality may eliminate physically relevant paths connecting conformational basins and therefore introducing artificial energy barriers that do not present obstacles in Cartesian space,” Minary tells PhysOrg. “In the present case, the major challenge was to develop an algorithm that supports degrees of freedom representing arbitrary collective rearrangements at all-atom resolution.”Unfortunately, Minary notes, using these degrees of freedom, or DOFs, could break chain connectivity – and the corresponding conformational space is likely to be associated with extremely rough energy surface topology. “To overcome these limitations,” he adds, “less collective rearrangements need to be utilized only at a necessary extent so that rearrangements along the more collective DOFs are optimally facilitated without significantly increasing the volume of the sampled conformational space.” In short, their major challenge was implementing a universal algorithm capable of exploring conformational space while allowing numerous sets of arbitrary and/or user-defined so-called natural DOFs.The team addressed these issues, Minary says, by building on the preexisting high-level computational environment of the MOSAICS software package that enabled the use of arbitrary even chain breaking DOFs. “To further improve on this concept,” he adds, “a very flexible new interface had to be invented that welcomes users to define their own system specific DOFs. In addition, the interface also had to support the weighted superposition of arbitrary DOFs. Finally a universal algorithm that realizes the interaction of various sets of DOFs needed to be implemented.” By so doing, conformational paths along the most collective molecular rearrangements are augmented by the incorporation of progressively more detailed molecular flexibility without significantly altering the dimensionality problem, which is better quantified by the conformational volume to be sampled rather than the actual number of DOFs. Effects of adding hierarchical degrees of freedom on sampling a large symmetric RNA structure. (A) Hierarchical moves used. A system of this complexity has many possible collective motions. Here seven sets of independent degrees of freedom (L1 to L7) are defined. (B) Convergence is accelerated by higher order rigid body moves. When nested hierarchical moves L1 to L7 were used, rapid convergence to the limiting is reached within 2 × 104 iterations (vertical dashed line labeled *). Image Copyright © PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1119918109 Other innovations are also in the works. “In the current paper we showed that our algorithm satisfies some necessary conditions of phase space, or detailed balance, preserving sampling not satisfied by any of the available algorithms used to model RNA systems,” Minary notes. “Further efforts are invested to fully satisfy microscopic reversibility.” Moreover, computational efficiency may be improved by using information on the collective nature of DOFs when updating atomic interactions, or by defining energy functional forms in terms of low dimensional analytical coordinates. Minary points out that sampling efficiency could also be improved if the current approach is combined with some advanced sampling algorithms based on multi-canonical sampling available in MOSAICS.In addition, he continues, the movement of explicit water could be incorporated into the hierarchical moves so that effects of solvation can be more accurately evaluated – and testing the method with various implicit solvent representations may also be informative. “Finally,” he says, “we’re planning to introduce a more user friendly – possibly graphical – interface that would bridge the gap between algorithm developers and computational biologists, physicists and chemists who have great insight and intuitions about the natural DOFs of various molecular assemblies and complexes.” Altogether, all the above efforts, which would increase mathematical rigor, computational speed, solvent details and accessibility to users, could further extend the boundaries of applications beyond the current systems being considered.In the meantime, while developing all the necessary algorithms discussed above, the team plans to continue extending the range of target applications. “Besides modeling the structure of chromatin,” Minary illustrates, “we’d like to revisit questions in DNA nanotechnology.” Furthermore, the use of a refinement method other than Cryo-EM (Cryo-Electron Microscopy, a form of transmission electron microscopy where samples are studied at cryogenic temperatures, and which the team is already pursuing) is also planned. “We intend to extend our work to extensively explore RNA junction flexibility,” adds Sim, “and are also currently looking into using our technique in RNA structure prediction of large RNA systems.” In terms of applications, Sim continues, “in medicine it’s vital to understand the flexibility, stability, shape and possible distortions of nanostructures to better evaluate the nanostructure quality. These properties could play crucial roles in dictating cellular internalization and/or toxicity of nanostructures.”Sim points out that with their efficient modeling tool, although still dependent on the quality of the force field used, the team is now more capable of studying these properties in silico. “Additionally,” Sim notes, “we’re looking into optimization in sequence- and structure-space simultaneously by having sequence as an additional degree of freedom.” A possible application is the sequence design of silencing RNA, or siRNA.Looking further afield, Minary tells PhysOrg, there are other technologies and applications that might benefit from their findings. “Since proper sampling and exploration of the conformational space is a basic tool used in various technologies and applications, the method could be used in design, homology modeling and various new applications such as modeling collective rearrangements in trans-membrane proteins, designing new nucleic acid nanostructures, modeling large protein-nucleic acid assemblies, such a the ribosome, and the in silico study of chromatin remodeling. In addition,” he adds, “we’d like to aid the refinement and interpretation of experimental techniques.” Specifically, building on former efforts to refine Cryo-EM data, they’d like to develop tools to analyze NMR, FRET, SAXS, X-Ray, and footprinting experiments in order to generate conformational ensembles that satisfy experimental constraints. Finally, Minary points out that the algorithm they developed is very general in nature and could be also utilized in other disciplines that involve state spaces with a large number of variables that are changing in a correlated manner. “In particular,” he concludes, “the basic idea could be used but not limited to sampling the space of possible networks, as in systems biology applications, or stock market variables.” More information: Modeling and design by hierarchical natural moves, PNAS February 21, 2012 vol. 109 no. 8 2890-2895, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1119918109Related:The effects of polymeric nanostructure shape on drug delivery, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, Volume 63, Issues 14–15, November 2011, Pages 1228–1246, doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2011.06.016 Square-Shaped RNA Particles from Different RNA Folds, Nano Letters, February 24, 2009 (Web), 9 (3), 1270–1277, doi: 10.1021/nl900261h Citation: Modeling the miniscule: High-resolution design of nanoscale biomolecules (2012, March 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-miniscule-high-resolution-nanoscale-biomolecules.html Explore furthercenter_img Swimming upstream: Flux flow reverses for lattice bosons in a magnetic field This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — A key element of both biotechnology and nanotechnology is – perhaps unsurprisingly – computational modeling. Frequently, in silico nanostructure design and simulation precedes actual experimentation. Moreover, the ability to use modeling to predict biomolecular structure lays the foundation for the subsequent design of biomolecules. Historically, the problem has been that most modeling software presents a tradeoff between being general purpose (in being able to model systems at high/atomic resolution) but limited in scope (i.e., only explores a small fraction conformational space around the initial structure). Recently, however, Stanford University scientists have developed an algorithm – implemented in a modeling program known as MOSAICS (Methodologies for Optimization and SAmpling In Computational Studies) – that achieves nanoscale modeling at the resolution required without being limited by the scope/size dilemma. In addition, the researchers successfully modeled – and benchmarked the new computation modeling technique with – RNA-based nanostructures. Copyright 2012 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more

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79 youth in JK have joined militant ranks this yr Govt

first_img79 youth in Kashmir Valley have joined various terror outfits during this year, a figure which is 30 per cent higher than that of the previous year, Rajya Sabha was informed on Wednesday.Replying to a written question by BJP member Lal Sinh Vadodia, Minister of State for Home Haribhai Parathibhai Chaudhary said as per reports, 79 youths have joined militant ranks during 2015 (as on November 30) whereas 60 youths joined militant ranks during the corresponding period of 2014.There has been a growing concern within the security establishment about the sudden increase in disappearance of youths in Kashmir Valley this year and reports coming in suggest that they have joined various militant organisations, especially pro-Pakistan Hizbul Mujahideen led by Burhan Wani.The minister informed the Upper House that the terrorist activities in the Jammu and Kashmir were regularly being monitored and reviewed at various levels. He said that the government has adopted various counter measures to neutralise these efforts and capabilities of militants to disturb peace in the state.Chaudhary said the government has also encouraged policies to mainstream the youth, including providing employment opportunities to wean them away from militancy.He said various steps have been initiated, including proactively taking suitable measures to safeguard the borders from cross-border terrorism and containing militancy.last_img read more

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850 Years of History Engulfed in Flames – A Look at the

first_imgThe news that a large fire engulfed the beloved Gothic-age structure, the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15th, sent shockwaves around the world. The flames began in the afternoon hours and shortly after caused the cathedral’s prominent spire to collapse. The fire continued to burn for hours and further ravaged the ribbed roof of the cathedral, constructed from large oak beams some of which dated to the 13th century.Hundreds of firefighters risked their lives in their attempt to save the iconic site. At the end of the day, it was confirmed that the cathedral’s overall structure and its two towers were saved; or in the words of French President Emmanuel Macron who was also present on the scene, “the worst had been avoided.” One firefighter was seriously injured, though no other casualties were reported.Photo by Remi Mathis CC By SA 4.0What caused the fire has not been made immediately clear yet. According to reports, restoration work that was set in place on the site may have been the reason for the hazard. Already on Tuesday, April 16th, police began investigations, conducting interviews with construction workers who were hired for the cathedral’s renovation efforts before the fire.AdChoices广告inRead invented by TeadsAs Notre Dame was burning, the city of Paris went on stand by. Thousands of Parisians gathered by the river Seine and watched the blaze in tears and disbelief. In comments for media outlets, most onlookers described the scene as utterly devastating. During the blaze the French national anthem was being sung, as well as some people praying.Photo by Remi Mathis CC By SA 4.0The fierce blaze that rapidly advanced did not only diminish one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in Europe and the world but threatened 850 years of history. Notre Dame has stood as a symbol of Paris, of Catholicism, of France, Europe and civilization.Construction work on the medieval Catholic cathedral began in 1160 on Île de la Cité, a small island on the Seine, and was nearly completed some hundred years later. Ever since the 13th-century, it has been the site of important happenings, including the coronation of English monarch, Henry VI of England and Napoleon Bonaparte in 1804.The cathedral has endured over the centuries, through the French revolution and through great neglect that had left Notre Dame in a half-ruinous state at the beginning of the 19th century. Interest in the site had surged following Victor Hugo’s publication of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, after which significant reconstruction efforts were arranged by authorities. The cathedral also survived the two world wars that followed in the 20th century, included the Nazi occupation of France.Cathedrale Notre Dame de Paris and the river Seine by sunsetAs fire swept through the site on April 15th, one group of firefighters were fighting the fumes and another was commissioned to rescue some of the priceless relics accommodated inside the cathedral.One such item that was fortunately saved was the Holy Crown of Thorns, perhaps the most revered relic kept at the Gothic structure. The piece, kept in a special case of rock crystal, is believed to be the original crown of thorns, that stood on the head of Jesus during his crucifixion. This sacred religious artifact originates from Jerusalem and was acquired by King Louis IX in 1238.A tunic that belonged to the same king, and who was, in fact, the only French king to be canonized as Saint Louis by the church in 1297, was also spared from the fire. King Louis had lost his life in the Eighth Crusade some three decades before he was canonized.Gargoyle sitting on Notre Dame Cathedral and looking on Paris cityscapeThe cathedral’s iconic Great Organ and one of the most treasured musical instruments in the world has also remained intact, though it most likely suffered damage from water. The 8000-pipe organ is dated from 1403; it has been refurbished over the centuries, but some of its parts are authentic, dated to the Middle Ages.The North Rose Window, which is one of the cathedral’s colossal and remarkable stained glass windows survived through the horrendous event too. But the fire likely took its toll on other remarkable features and items, the details of which have yet to be fully revealed.President Macron said in statements that he was “sad to see this part of us burn,” after which he also vowed to rebuild the cathedral. François Pinault and Bernard Arnault, two eminent French billionaires, have already pledged sums of millions to restore Notre Dame.Gorgeous sunset over Notre Dame cathedral with puffy clouds, Paris, FranceIn a tweet in French, Alessandro Gisotti, interim Director of the Holy See said that “The Holy See has learned with incredulity and sadness the news of the terrible fire that ravaged the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris, a symbol of Christianity, in France and in the world.”Read another story from us:  Notre Dame Cathedral Through the Ages – A Beautiful History in PhotosEach year the monumental site has welcomed approximately 13 million visitors, second only to the Eiffel Tower. Experts are due to assess the damage inflicted on the site both from the fire and the water that fire officers used in response to the emergency.last_img read more

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VIDEO Managing a Multisite Radiology Practice With AIbased Workflow

first_imgSponsored Content | Videos | Information Technology | February 28, 2019 VIDEO: Managing a Multi-site Radiology Practice With AI-based Workflow Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items center_img Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Andrew Deutch Explains Use of an AI-assisted Radiology WorkflowVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 12:44Loaded: 1.31%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -12:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Andrew Deutsch, M.D., MBA, chairman and CEO of Renaissance Imaging Medical Associates (RIMA), an affiliate of Radiology Partners, describes RIMA’s use of an artificial intelligence (AI) based worklist workflow to manage reads across 70 sites and load balance between 120 radiologists. He spoke in sessions on this topic at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.  Deutsch, a nationally respected expert in skeletal radiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in addition to his roles at RIMA, serves as medical director of the imaging departments at Northridge Hospital Medical Center and Valley Presbyterian Hospital.Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. Find other news and video from HIMSS 2019.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Technology Reports View all 9 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Information Technology View all 220 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Women’s Health View all 62 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.last_img read more

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Tourists robbed on riverboat in canals of Tortuguero

first_imgView Larger MapUpdated Tuesday, Dec. 10, 11:13 p.m.:Monday morning, three armed assailants wearing black ski masks took over a tourist riverboat headed for La Pavona in Tortugero on the northern Caribbean coast. The pirates robbed all 14 people on board, including 12 foreign tourists and two Costa Rican crew members.The thieves stole cash, cellphones, watches, cameras, and at least one tablet from the tourists visiting Costa Rica from the United States, Spain and Switzerland. Exact values for the stolen goods and cash have yet to be totaled.The thieves intercepted the vessel as it slowed to pass through a shallow curve in one of the area’s famous canals.Rebeca Gómez, manager of Laguna Lodge, which operated the tour, told The Tico Times that the gunmen ordered the boat to stop and the captain beached the vessel on a sandbar. When the assailants ordered the visitors to hand over their valuables, the tour guide told the guests to cooperate. No one was injured.“We’re still in shock,” Gómez said over the phone.Judicial Investigation Police (OIJ) Guápiles Regional Delegation Director Josué Bravo said that the river conditions made escape unlikely for the boat. The regional director added that the robbers were likely locals. After the robbery, they fled into a part of the marshes that is difficult to access, he said. The remote town of Tortuguero sits near the eponymous national park, famous for its sea turtles and other wildlife. The area’s isolation is part of its charm but also a hindrance to Tortuguero’s meager police force.Gómez said she and several other hoteliers in Tortuguero were angry at the lack of resources allocated to the police force there, as crime has risen in recent years.“The handful of police here lack a lot of basic necessities,” Gómez said, painting a picture of community left without the resources to police its famous beaches and verdant natural canals. In some instances, she said, officers aren’t able to feed themselves on their shifts, and local hotels end up providing them with meals. “Tourists can’t go down to visit the beaches and see the turtles hatch,” Gómez told The Tico Times, “Someone brings them down there and when someone takes out a camera, they’re robbed!”Several Tortugero residents and business owners contacted The Tico Times Monday and Tuesday expressing concern that crime was destroying their community. Gómez said that several tourist-based businesses and community members planned to organize a meeting early next week to pen a letter demanding more police support and resources. “We’re really concerned about the safety of our clients. It’s the most important thing,” she concluded.The story is developing. Follow updates at ticotimes.net.Correction: An earlier version of this post reported that there were only seven people on board the boat when the robbery took place, which was based on information provided by OIJ Guápiles Regional Delegation Director Josué Bravo. The number of victims was 14 total, according to Rebeca Gómez, who filed the formal complaint with law enforcement Tuesday afternoon after The Tico Times spoke with Bravo. Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img read more

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Next steps discussed at National Council Updated

first_imgDiscussion began on Monday at the National Council on the way forward for the Cyprus negotiations, Government Spokesman Nicos Christodoulides said.Speaking to the press following the meeting, which lasted around four hours, the spokesman said that the Council would reconvene on Tuesday morning, adding that further meetings would be needed to complete the discussion.He said that the government had expressed its readiness, as it had at the negotiating table, for the prospects to be created that would allow optimism for a positive outcome.Asked about the proposals placed by the political parties and how the president was going to make use of them, Christodoulides said that a very productive dialogue took place  and at the end of the debate the government would examine how all the proposals and suggestions would be used and to what extent there could be a common approach.He said that there was absolute respect for different approaches, views and considerations and at the end “what we have is a productive discussion”. He did not make any comments on the proposals, and asked the press to be patient until the conclusion of the meetings.Replying to another question about the presence of Greek Foreign Minister Nicos Kotzias at Tuesday’s meeting of the National Council, the spokesman said that he was attending in the framework of the coordination between Athens and Nicosia for the next steps and, more specifically, as regards the issues of security and guarantees.The Greek government was not involved in the internal aspects of the Cyprus problem, he said.You May LikeCity BeautyDo This To Fix Sagging Jowls Without SurgeryCity BeautyUndoHearClearRowland Heights Seniors With Hearing Loss Are In For a Big SurpriseHearClearUndoGundry MD Vital Reds SupplementFeeling Worn Out? Top Surgeon: It’s Like Rocket Fuel For Your FatigueGundry MD Vital Reds SupplementUndo Pensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

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