Nelson Minor Hockey grad Adam Wheeldon off to Concordia University

first_imgWheeldon, 20, came up through the ranks of Nelson Minor Hockey before latching on with the Kootenay Ice of the BC Hockey Major Midget League in 2009.The next season he earned a spot with hometown Nelson Leafs of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League where he had 11 points in 44 games.Wheeldon’s high-octane play earned him a spot in the BC Hockey League with Trail Smoke Eaters from 2011-14.In 140 games with the Smokies, Wheeldon accumulated 39 points.However, Wheeldon left Trail during the offseason, playing his final season in the AJHL with Camrose.Wheeldon, 20, completed a successful season in the Alberta Junior Hockey League with Camrose where the 5’11”, 200-pound forward scored 10 goals while adding 14 assists in 59 games with the AJHL South regular season champions.”The Kodiaks organization would like to congradulate Adam and his family on this achievement in his hockey career and we look forward to many more years of hockey and education,” Rybalka said in closing.Wheeldon joins a host of graduating players from the AJHL choosing to remain in Alberta to find offers on the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference team. Nelson Minor Hockey grad Adam Wheeldon has accepted an offer to attend Concordia University in Edmonton.Concordia plays in the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference against college and university teams from throughout Alberta.“Adam will have an impact from day one with the team,” said Kodiaks coach and GM Boris Rybalka on the team website.“His style of play will make him a fan favourite and opposition players will need to keep their heads up when he is on the ice.”“Coach Glegloff is excited about having Adam attend Concordia as he sees his leadership and compete level paying dividends to the program,” Rybalka adds.last_img read more

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Restaurants worry as homedining services take eating out off the table

first_imgDecking up, gathering some friends and going to a fancy restaurant that serves mouth-watering dishes equals a Sunday well-spent. On the other hand, eating out is also a hot option for people who get hardly any time to cook due to severe pressure from work and personal life.While visiting a nice restaurant still wins hands down, in-house consumption of equally mouth-watering delicacies for a lot less than what the restaurant charges is slowly catching people’s fancy.Bengaluru, which sees a huge influx of people from other states of India every year, has many such home-chefs whose businesses are flourishing.Advertising professional Pramod Shankar and his wife Lakshmi, serve a delightful five-course breakfast to guests. It consists of traditional items seen in a Kerala breakfast: a variety of puttus with kadala curry, appams with vegetable stew, papads fried in coconut oil, “adai” – a steamed banana dish, and “sulaimani” – a Malabar-style black tea with lime and mint.To enhance the feeling of eating at home, the couple plays old Malayalam film songs in the background, and has decorated the living room with lamps and jasmine bouquets, Bangalore Mirror reported.Originally from Cochin, Pramod and Lakshmi started their business with food stalls at the Sunday Soul Sante flea market in 2009. Then, hosting a wedding sadya a few years ago, where everyone praised their cooked dishes, the couple got the idea of a home-dining business.Since last year, the couple has hosted five such breakfasts, but look forward to expand the business once they move into their new and larger house in Koramangala.While Bengaluru is still in the early stages of this business compared to Mumbai and Delhi, several home-dining chefs are coming forward, generating a lot of interest.There are several platforms that are trying to bring home chefs in direct contact with customers. Califormia-based “Travelling Spoon” (TS) is one such platform, which has tied up with home chefs from around the world.”Our goal is to offer a high-quality curated selection of vetted hosts who offer travellers exceptional experiences. We feature our hosts online and allow travellers to book those experiences directly,” said Aashi Vel, one of the founders of TS.Telecom professional Archana Rajesh and homemaker Asha George are the only two chefs in Bengaluru with whom TS has tied up. Although neither of them has hosted a meal at home yet, Vel said Archana has already planned her menu: a traditional Gowda meal costing Rs 1,000-1,200 per person.Interestingly, TS screens home chefs before giving them a chance to serve their delicacies. For example, Archana had to provide extensive details after applying for the TS job that appeared in a travel magazine, then give a Skype interview and finally host a TS person at home.Outside of India, other countries have also taken up this business.For instance, in Paris, an Italian family runs the business at their small flat. Their menu includes aubergine pancakes, a kind of Neapolitan potato pie and meatballs with three kinds of pasta. The wine is carefully picked out, BBC reported.Dining out would cost more than €80 in a normal Paris restaurant, but the Italian couple charge guests only €25 each.This trend of diners around the world choosing home-cooked delicacies over an expensive visit to a restaurant is making eateries jittery over sales, as they are rushing to call it “illegal”.Didier Chenet, President of the main Paris restaurateurs’ union “Synhorcat”, has appealed to the French government to take action against home chefs and stop them, claiming bistros and brasseries are putting them out of business.”Today, many restaurants in France are on a knife-edge because of the economic crisis. Losing just half a dozen customers can spell disaster,” he said.”There are people out there offering a service which is identical to restaurants: a choice of starters, main courses, desserts, wine, the works. But they pay no rent, no staff, no taxes — it is completely illegal,” he added.Synhorcat estimated that there are 3,000 home-chefs in France. It put up two arguments against them: first, that home-dining business is a part of the black economy, and second, hygiene and safety rules are being broken.”If the government doesn’t do something to stop the underground restaurants, it will be a disaster,” said Chenet.last_img read more

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Mays Brexit talks with Labour stall

first_imgTheresa May`s premiership and Brexit, since 2016. Photo: AFPBritain’s opposition Labour Party said on Friday that talks with the government on a last-ditch Brexit deal had made no progress, as EU leaders said prime minister Theresa May had not convinced them that they should let Britain delay its departure next week.May wrote to Brussels asking European Union leaders to postpone Britain’s exit from next Friday until 30 June. But they have insisted that she must first show a viable plan to secure agreement on her divorce deal in the deadlocked parliament.Labour, which she turned to reluctantly after failing three times to get her deal passed, said the government “has not offered real change or compromise” in three days of talks.”We urge the prime minister to come forward with genuine changes to her deal,” a statement said.Labour Brexit spokesman Keir Starmer said his party wanted the talks to go on, and a spokesman for May’s office said the government had “made serious proposals” in the talks and wanted them to continue over the weekend “in order to deliver a deal that is acceptable to both sides”.May badly needs evidence of a viable divorce strategy to persuade the other 27 EU leaders at a summit next Wednesday to grant a delay, preferably on her preferred departure date.Any extension would require unanimous approval from the other EU countries, all weary of Britain’s Brexit indecision, and could come with conditions.”If we are not able to understand the reason why the UK is asking for an extension, we cannot give a positive answer,” said French finance minister Bruno Le Maire. German justice minister Katarina Barley tweeted: “This playing for time must end.”Deep divisions in May’s Conservative Party and government, and in Labour, have led to a marathon of votes in parliament, in which scenarios ranging from abandoning the EU with no transition period to cancelling Brexit have all been defeated.Last Friday, May did the unthinkable by asking Labour to negotiate with her on a deal that might work for both – although some in Labour said she was luring the party into sharing responsibility for her failure.Letter To BrusselsHoping this would satisfy EU leaders, May wrote to EU summit chair Donald Tusk proposing a delay until June 30 at the latest, accepting that Britain might have to hold European Parliament elections on 23 May, which she had hoped to avoid.”The government will want to agree a timetable for ratification that allows the United Kingdom to withdraw from the European Union before 23 May, 2019, and therefore cancel the European Parliament elections, but will continue to make responsible preparations to hold the elections should this not prove possible,” the letter said.So far, there has been little appetite in Brussels for an extension that could create another cliff edge in three months. May asked two weeks ago for a delay until June 30, only to be turned down.Tusk is planning to propose an extension of a year, which could also be shortened if Britain ratifies the withdrawal agreement, senior EU officials said.”The only reasonable way out would be a long but flexible extension. I would call it a ‘flextension’,” one official said.”It seems to be a good scenario for both sides, as it gives the UK all the necessary flexibility, while avoiding the need to meet every few weeks to further discuss Brexit extensions.”But Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said May’s letter raised questions, adding: “We hope for more clarity from London before next Wednesday.”And France, which wants the EU to move on to other business including reforms proposed by President Emmanuel Macron, indicated it was not ready to accept any delay without a clear plan.”If we are not able to understand the reason why the UK is asking for an extension, we cannot give a positive answer,” finance minister Bruno Le Maire told reporters in Bucharest.Second referendum?Sterling fell against the US dollar immediately after Labour’s comments and stood 0.5 per cent down on the day.With time running out, it was not clear how Britain would avoid the abrupt “no-deal” departure that business leaders in Britain and also neighbouring Ireland say would cause huge disruption.Germany, as one of those with most to lose from a sudden dislocation of trade, has been one of those most tolerant of Britain’s turmoil.Justice Minister Barley tweeted that “there can only be an extension with a clear direction”, but also proposed a potential way out by adding: “This includes the question of a second referendum.”The idea of asking Britons – who voted by 52 per cent to 48 to leave the EU three years ago – to confirm or reject any divorce deal has been gaining ground in Britain.Yet May herself and many lawmakers in both main parties are strongly opposed, saying it would betray voters and undermine democracy, especially if it offered an option to stay in the EU.Both main parties made commitments after the referendum to deliver Brexit, but they never settled on a plan for how to leave or what future relationship to seek.May long insisted that her plan – quitting all EU institutions, with a 21-month standstill period to negotiate a bespoke free trade deal – was the only viable one. But it still split her cabinet and infuriated the most eurosceptic of her Conservatives.Labour wants closer ties than May has sought, including a customs union, which she has so far ruled out. Many Labour members of parliament insist that any agreement must be put to a second public vote.last_img
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