Manly rookie Kelly tipped for NRL spot

first_imgKelly joined the Sea Eagles after three seasons with the Gold Coast Titans in the NYC where he scored a club-record 35 tries from 54 matches.He also scored four tries for the Junior Blues in the 2015 State of Origin clash but it’s not just his attacking ability that has caught the eye of his teammates. With the future of club legends Brett Stewart and Steve Matai in doubt, Lawrence said the 20-year-old had the temperament to work his way into the first grade squad if his pre-season form was anything to go by. “I’m not the coach, but I’d put him in the side,” Lawrence told NRL.com at the Auckland Nines Captains Call. “He’s shown experience beyond his game-time and that shows me that with a bit more time on the field, he could do some great things. You don’t want to rush it, but at the same time you want to give him a go and see what happens.”Lawrence has tipped his younger teammate to be one of the stars of the Nines, warning opposition defences to beware of Kelly’s footwork. “We’ve all been training against each other since October and now it’s an opportunity for us to get out there and show it against the real opposition. Young blokes like Brian can really make a name for themselves if they have a good tournament,” he said. “You wouldn’t want to be standing still because he’ll dance right around you with those feet of his. He’s also got a really good head on his shoulders. He’s really settled in here and he’s really comfortable in his new surroundings.”This will be Kelly’s second trip to the Nines after playing one game for the Titans in last year’s tournament where he gained valuable experience and learnt a lot about what was needed to make it in the NRL.Now he wants to show Sea Eagles coach Trent Barrett that he has what it takes to cut it against the game’s elite. “This is probably the first real chance that the coaches get to see any kind of footy, so here and the trials are a great opportunity to show them and my teammates what I can do,” Kelly told NRL.com. “I’ve had a few chats with Trent and he’s been upfront and honest about what he wants from me. He says I need to keep training hard and working hard, and if I do that then rewards may follow.”I want to show them what I can do in defence, and I know the attack will come after that.” Hailing from Ballina on the NSW north coast, Kelly admitted to feeling homesick for the first few weeks down in Sydney. But the support of his teammates, coupled with Manly’s seemingly endless supply of beaches, made the transition a smooth one. “I was a bit homesick at the start but it’s all good now. The boys have been welcoming so it makes it heaps comfortable,” he said. “I’m a 100 per cent beach boy so I’m always heading down to the beach after training or when I have some spare time.”last_img read more

Continue reading

A More Mindful Week Understanding Self and Others

first_imgby, NamarahTweet5Share9ShareEmail14 SharesHere’s a thought: Elders want to be seen as people.Don’t we all want to be known this way? As a young African American adult I can identify with this viscerally. It’s sad how desensitized I am from the quickly averted glances, the compliments on how surprisingly “articulate” I am, or even the go-to expert on black culture. Our society programs seamlessly the realm of otherness into our vernacular, lifestyle, and attitudes. In this category of otherness we distance ourselves from the humane and are more willing to pass judgements on identity, ability or personhood.“Most people are not able to look on each other as human beings, and in spite of everything, to treat each other that way. Until this happens, freedom is only an empty word.”  – James Baldwin, The Price of the TicketFirst, I encourage you all to read Baldwin’s writings – when you do, you will understand how much LIFE is just in his work… ugh (Okay, I’ll calm down now). Second, the universal truth shouts to us that fair treatment to some is not equality, equity or freedom. We hurt ourselves and damage our humanity by doing anything less than the standard of care we require for our own. When we commit crimes against the human soul; Black, Elder, LGBTQ, and all, how can you expect there to be positive change?The same way we are all human – despite our life experiences, gender, or sexuality – we all grow and age. Would YOU want to live in a nursing home? Would YOU want to be seen as disabled? Would YOU want to be seen as them, or a resident, or anything less than who you are? People… When did we become so unloving?It’s not an unfair question – we are so consumed with fortifying our comfortable realities rather than breaking down walls. We expect others to agree with our ideals without conceding that we must first hear and accept theirs. So I ask…  WHEN will we stop? I will.I choose to look you in the eye and smile.I will listen.I will hear.It is a daily action we must choose to be mindful of. Unfortunately, many of us fall into the practice of selfish living – I include myself! It’s almost second nature, but the beauty in being human is that we do not have to continue to live in such a way. Let’s try to be more mindful this week… Just take that step – I’m sure you’ll like the way it feels.Related PostsThe Fixes for AgeismAge discrimination affects our country’s business, economy, values, and human dignity. It’s time we transform our perceptions of aging, from dependency and weakness to one of proficiency and resourcefulness.What do you mean by “old”?Agism cuts both ways, discriminating against both the so-called ‘young’ and ‘old,’ and turns these two seemingly innocuous words into pejoratives. When ‘young’ and ‘old’ are used colloquially rather than as they were intended (as comparative markers of time) they become profane.About that OTHER WordI want to talk about another word that is used to demean and diminish older people. This time Kavan’s the one getting in dustups, with no less than Oprah and AARP.Tweet5Share9ShareEmail14 SharesTags: culture change generationslast_img read more

Continue reading