Azkals forge tie with Yemenis, inch closer toward AFC Asian Cup slot

first_imgWith four regular starters out due to injuries, Dooley tinkered with his lineup, giving JPV Marikina defender Sean Kane a surprise start at central defense, while Davao Aguilas’ Simone Rota returned from injury and Daisuke Sato regained his leftback spot.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “We’re going to close the deal in Nepal,” vowed Azkals coach Thomas Dooley. “We came here to win, but at least we didn’t lose. We’re very happy with the point.”“The team didn’t deserve to go home with a loss. The spirit was great, the preparation was great for this game. I’m actually satisfied overall.”Tawfik Ali put Yemen ahead with an opportunistic strike in the 63rd minute after the Azkals failed to clear a corner.The Azkals quickly brought more men forward with little effect until substitute Junior Muñoz showed grit and determination as he marauded down the right and cut the ball back for Phil Younghusband, who took a touch for Mulders.Ott managed to stay onside before showing composure to finish as the Azkals found the equalizer right at the death.ADVERTISEMENT CIMB Classic: Pagunsan assured of P.65 million Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments LATEST STORIES FILE  Photo by: Tristan Tamayo/Inquirer.netSummoning its old, fighting form, the Philippines moved within a whisker of an AFC Asian Cup spot after salvaging a 1-1 draw with Yemen Tuesday night at Al Wakrah Stadium in Doha, Qatar.For the second straight game, the Azkals needed a late goal to secure a point against the Yemenis as Mike Ott struck in the 89th minute to keep the Filipinos in pole position in Group F, where the top two sides will qualify for the tournament in the United Arab Emirates in 2019.ADVERTISEMENT Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson MOST READ The Azkals struggled to break down the Yemenis for most of the match until Ott, who plays for Angthong United in the Thai second division, got on the end of a clever ball from Paul Mulders and beat Mohammad Ayash at his near post for the equalizer.The result increased the Azkals’ tally to eight points, two ahead of Tajikistan and Yemen, which play against each other in November in Dushanbe.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogThe Azkals can seal qualification in the continent’s showpiece tournament with a victory over Nepal in Kathmandu on Nov. 14.With only a point to show from its first four matches, the Nepalese are virtually out of the running for an AFC Cup berth. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacsonlast_img read more

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UCF’s Tacko Fall is 7-foot-6, and his game is still growing

first_imgFILE – In this Jan. 8, 2017, file photo, Central Florida’s Tacko Fall (24) stands above his team in a huddle during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, in Hartford, Conn. The tallest player in college basketball strolls the campus at UCF _ not your traditional basketball power. But anybody in the NBA or college hoops who doesn’t know 7-foot-6 Tacko Fall should get up to speed on the 21-year-old from Senegal. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)ORLANDO, Fla. — Tacko Fall can never hide.The tallest man in college basketball was walking from the University of Central Florida student union to his dormitory one recent morning, waiting for the light to change at an intersection when a driver — perhaps under the illusion that there’s more than one 7-foot-6 kid enrolled there — hit the brakes and yelled a question out the window.ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set If everyone at UCF — and in college basketball — doesn’t know who he is yet, they might soon.“He’s learning things now that another player might have learned five years ago, by no fault of his own,” UCF coach Johnny Dawkins said. “He just picked up the game later than everybody else. He’s super-intelligent, speaks multiple languages, he’s just off the charts. He just needs more experience. And how do you gain experience? There’s only one way. You’ve got to get out there and do it.”Fall is a quick study. He’s the reigning defensive player of the year in the American Athletic Conference, a blocker of 164 shots in his first two college seasons and a changer of countless others. He’s made 73 percent of his field-goal attempts in college, since most come around the rim. Defenses last season started pushing him more and more away from the basket, so Fall added a few pounds of muscle this offseason in hopes of pushing back.He took a look at the NBA this past spring, visiting with five clubs to get their feedback on his game.The critiques weren’t often kind. But he listened and learned.“They showed me things,” said Fall, who is listed at 295 pounds. “I was able to see it, not just hear about it, but see it. Skill-wise, I added a lot to my offensive game. Defense is probably going to be the biggest thing for me because of my size and how I can affect the game, but the game has changed a lot. There’s versatile bigs now and I need to keep up.”ADVERTISEMENT Tickets for PH-Japan Fiba World qualifying game in Tokyo sold out Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ When Fall was 16, Ibrahima N’Diaye changed everything. He ran a basketball academy and suggested to Fallthat he try to play in the U.S.There was one small problem. Fall despised the game, but eventually came around thanks to his basketball-loving grandmother.“There used to be cartoons on every day at 5 o’clock,” Fall said. “And one day, I think our national basketball team was competing, my grandma put that on instead of the cartoons. We had only one TV, and I got mad.”He got over it.He came to the U.S., first going to Houston and then bouncing around a bit before settling in Florida. He enrolled at Liberty Christian Prep — a place where the devout Muslim could have plenty of spirited, respectful, thought-provoking conversations with teachers and other students about religion.It was also a place where he realized basketball could provide a future.“The tough times really make you appreciate what you have,” Fall said. “It’s destiny. I met a guy who I had never met before, went home to talked to my mom about playing basketball which I never imagined I would play, wound up coming to the States and ended up in Florida, the best place I could have ended up at. Everything worked out just fine.”It might only get better.He isn’t sure if he’ll declare for the NBA draft next spring or just again explore his options. He speaks three languages now and is trying to learn Japanese, largely because of his affinity for anime. Food isn’t hard to find now — pasta and chicken before every game is his routine. And he’s hoping that his mom, whom he hasn’t seen in five years, might be able to get to a UCF game this season.And one day, he wants to go home with NBA money to do some good. Ask him his dream plan, and he’ll say itinvolves being able to build schools in Senegal. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? LATEST STORIES They need to keep up with him, too.Fall might be an unusual star, but a star nonetheless. Walk with him around campus, and one of two things often happen — either fellow students yell his name and wave, or they try to act cool while sneaking a selfie. Fall doesn’t mind in either case. And yes, he’s heard every joke imaginable about his height and his name.“He’s very comfortable with who he is,” said Dawkins, who played with 7-7 Manute Bol and 7-6 Shawn Bradley in the NBA and tries to impart wisdom to Fall on what he learned from their experiences.Fall knows what they went through, but doesn’t want to be considered The Next Bol or The Next Bradley.“I want to be the first me,” he said.Fall truly is a center of attention.Wichita State is new to the American Athletic Conference this season, so at the league’s media day last month, Shockers coach Gregg Marshall was learning plenty of new names and faces. Fall, who didn’t exactly need a “Hello My Name Is” sticker on his black UCF polo shirt, went up to Marshall and introduced himself anyway.Marshall was impressed, and hadn’t even seen tape yet.“I saw him in the hallway,” Marshall said. “I’ve never seen a human that big. He’s a great young man.”Fall’s story is almost as unique as his size. Born in Senegal, his family went through some very difficult times. He often didn’t have enough to eat, to the point where he would have nothing for breakfast and then would try to ration his school lunch and preserve some to serve as dinner. Money was often tight. “Kids look up to us,” Fall said. “You don’t always get opportunities to get out and do something with your life. Being able to help other people, when you can do that you’ve got to take advantage of it. Life is short. You’ve got to leave your mark. You’ve got to do something that matters. I want to do something that matters.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “Yo,” the man yelled. “You Tacko?”Fall waved, shrugged and smiled as the driver shot him a thumbs-up and drove away.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“I think he knew who I was,” Fall said.This is an everyday thing for Elhadji Tacko Sereigne Diop Fall, a 21-year-old from Senegal who grew up playing soccer, couldn’t stand basketball when he first started playing five years ago and now has hopes of an NBA future. He bows his head to get through doorways, prefers sandals to shoes because they’re easier on his size 22 feet, and has found that even first-class airplane seats don’t give him enough leg room. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ View comments MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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Five more suits filed in deadly mudslide

first_img However, residents believe terracing the hill – which would cost tens of millions of dollars – would stabilize it and prevent further slides. State officials also have been reluctant to try to shore up the hillside. The county and state have talked about conducting a comprehensive study of the bluff, but no cost figures or timelines have been set. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card The county was aware of the potential threat and had a sufficient time before the landslide to take protective measures, the lawsuit states. “They should have required the hillside to be fixed,” plaintiffs’ attorney Anthony Murray said. “They took no steps to assist residents by requiring the La Conchita Ranch Co. (which owns the hillside) to make the area safe.” Ventura County Counsel Noel Klebaum declined to comment Friday about the lawsuit. Attorney Frank Sabaitis, who represents the ranch company, said the lawsuit doesn’t have any merit. “Based upon research, facts and information from experts, there is no factual basis for the ranch’s liability,” Sabaitis said. County officials have said that they have warned residents about the dangers of living in La Conchita, about 70 miles northwest of Los Angeles, and are unsure there is anything that can be done to prevent the landslides. Several geologists who have examined the hillside believe it will collapse again. Residents of a seaside town hit by a deadly landslide last year filed lawsuits against Ventura County and a private ranch company, claiming both were negligent in protecting the community. Twenty-three lawsuits have been filed in Ventura County Superior Court, covering a total of 39 plaintiffs. Five of the cases were filed Friday. Among the allegations are wrongful death, negligence, trespassing and damaged property. The plaintiffs are seeking unspecified damages. The lawsuits claim Ventura County officials failed to protect residents of La Conchita from a Jan. 10, 2005, mudslide that killed 10 people, destroyed 13 homes and damaged 23 others. A towering bluff above the community became saturated from a series of winter storms and a torrent of earth cascaded into the streets. last_img read more

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