Fort St. John health care crisis: ‘We also need to work smarter and better,’ say President for Doctors of B.C.

first_img“I learned that the north is a big place, and providing care in rural and remote areas is more complicated than I as an urban physician have given credit for,” Dr. Cavers said. “My own minor experiences in driving these huge distances with the weather; it really highlights the difficulties that the patients have accessing care and the doctors have in providing it.”Dr. Cavers adds, “We don’t have enough doctors in the rural areas; we don’t have enough nurses in the rural areas. There’s a real health human resources issue going on in B.C. right now.”Doctors of B.C. estimate the need to produce 450 new graduates per year, which at this point is only at 288 per year.- Advertisement -“We need to be able to attract more of our own graduates into rural areas and keep more of our graduates within British Columbia.”Dr. Carvers goes on to say while this issue is not unique to B.C, let alone just Fort St. John, it’s an issue that’s been “front and centre” during the organization’s meetings – a particular interest in creating a “made in B.C.” solution.“We also need to work smarter and better – we have to sort out ways where the physicians can provide care more easily and more efficiently so that they can expand their umbrella of care to cover more people,” Dr. Carver explained.Advertisement Dr. Carver concludes by saying the doctors within a community experiences a physician shortage are imperative in creating a solution.“A lot of physicians feel somewhat disconnected from the health authorities and the way the health authorities make decisions in terms of resource allocation, organization of health authority, work flows, etc.”Dr. Caver does however concede that these conversations have already, and continue to be held between heath authorities, the Ministry of Health, and Doctors of B.C.“We know the physicians have a unique perspective; they’re on the front lines of care, they know what can work and make a positive difference, and they have very good ideas and deserve to be heard.” Enter telemedicine; which Dr. Carver asserts to have the ability of working “for good or for evil.”“We can use telephone medicine for a whole bunch of follow-up care so that patients don’t have to worry about mobility or travelling problems, and physicians can ‘see them’ in a much more efficient manner,” Dr. Caver says he concluded after experiencing the drive from Dawson Creek to Fort St. John.Dr. Carver adds, “If telemedicine is brought in without any constraints, there’s a risk of creating a whole generation of ‘don’t even bother to walk-in’ clinics; in which people will phone in to talk to a physician for what I would call some relatively minor issues, and if the advise they’re given is unconnected to any longitudinal care – it can prove to be expensive and fragmented way of getting care.”Dr Carver says this can increase the risk to patients, reduce positive outcomes, and push up the per capita cost.Advertisementlast_img read more

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PICTURE SPECIAL AS REMOTE INTERNET ARRIVES AT TORY ISLAND NATIONAL SCHOOL

first_imgPatsy Dan Rodgers, King of Tory, discusses his mobile optimised website withDr Mary Attenborough, Michael Gallagher and Roisin Moran Brady of TheWebbery as they arrive on the island. Photo by alanlavander.comA COMPANY which helps provide remote internet access to  locations have been given a special welcome – by the 11 pupils of Scoil Cholmcille Oilean Thoraí – Tory’s national school.“In the 1970s, the government attempted to implement plans to close down Tory Island because they clearly believed it was in the middle of nowhere – but that’s definitely not true today”, said Dr Mary Attenborough of The Webbery when addressing the school students.The Technical Director and two other members of the web development company, based in An Fál Carrach, visited the school this week to launch their mobile website development. Roisin Moran Brady told the pupils about her great-great aunt Nora Sweeney, who taught at the school in 1915 and now that The Webbery is responsible for the island community’s website, the family connection has spanned almost a hundred years.The media consultant for the family business then invited the students to think about how advances with computers and the internet have transformed the opportunities for the island residents in the last century.“Our ancestors emigrated to America and all around the world but now there are so many areas of work that can be done right here on the island because of the internet,” she said.Remote working suggestions from the 11 pupils, aged between six and twelve, ranged from online selling and internet marketing to programming and app development. Fifth Class student Padraig Duggan proposed that even a physicist could work on Tory by communicating and researching projects online.Dr Attenborough went on to speak of their company’s success in remote working which now develops and provides active support to over 400 small business websites throughout Ireland. She then joined with the class to play the Internet Fact Search Game, based around domain name protocols, that she designed specifically for the children.“The pupils’ enthusiasm for new technology was palpable, but no more so than their pride in the old traditions,” said operations manager Michael Gallagher, as the children’s poignant rendition of the Tory Island anthem ‘Amhrán na Scadáin’, (‘The Song of the Herrings’), brought an end to the visit.“Tory Island isn’t in the middle of nowhere. With the island online, Tory really is in the middle of everywhere”. Googled out – the students of Scoil Cholmcille Oilean Thoraí relax withtablets and smartphones after playing the Internet Fact Search Game alongwith Dr Mary Attenborough, Michael Gallagher and Roisin Moran Brady of TheWebbery, School Principal, Anna Meehan, and School Secretary, Noreen Meenan.Photo by alanlavander.comPICTURE SPECIAL AS REMOTE INTERNET ARRIVES AT TORY ISLAND NATIONAL SCHOOL was last modified: June 13th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Scoil Cholmcille Oilean ThoraíThe WebberyTory Islandlast_img read more

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Sandstone Arches Get New Explanation

first_img(Visited 112 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The national park signs may need updating.Arches National ParkNatural sandstone arches occur in many parts of the world, most notably in Arches National Park in eastern Utah.  Visitors, upon reading the confident-sounding interpretive signs describing arch formation, might be surprised to learn that the origin of these structures is not fully understood.  In a recent paper in Nature Geoscience, researchers from the Czech Republic who ran some new lab experiments imply that prior theories are incomplete, if not wrong:Weathering and erosion of sandstone produces unique landforms such as arches, alcoves, pedestal rocks and pillars. Gravity-induced stresses have been assumed to not play a role in landform preservation and to instead increase weathering rates. Here we show that increased stress within a landform as a result of vertical loading reduces weathering and erosion rates, using laboratory experiments and numerical modelling. We find that when a cube of locked sand exposed to weathering and erosion processes is experimentally subjected to a sufficiently low vertical stress, the vertical sides of the cube progressively disintegrate into individual grains. As the cross-sectional area under the loading decreases, the vertical stress increases until a critical value is reached. At this threshold, fabric interlocking of sand grains causes the granular sediment to behave like a strong, rock-like material, and the remaining load-bearing pillar or pedestal landform is resistant to further erosion.The new theory is summarized in the BBC News.  In addition, Smithsonian Magazine has an embedded video clip of the experiments.In the authors’ view, gravity is the arch-hero, not the arch-villain.  The gravitational load causes a kind of self-organizing system: the sand grains lock together in the pillars, resisting erosion.  Eventually, of course, erosion wins, and the structure falls. It’s not clear if they can generalize this process to all arches.  They experimented with a particular sand in their home country.  “Critically, the sandstone from Strelec doesn’t contain cementing minerals that help bind the sand particles together,” the Smithsonian article says.  “Instead, the authors found that the stress put on the sandstone causes minerals to interlock and hold the rock together.”  It sounds like this is the best-case scenario to test the idea, because cementing materials would presumably increase the resistance to erosion in the pillars.  Whether this applies to the Entrada Sandstone in Arches National Park is not clear; it also would not seem to apply to granite arches, as pictured below.Mobius Arch (granite) by David CoppedgeWhatever its merits, this new theory turns the old one on its head: “We should not say erosion or weathering carved the forms, as it was the stress field which give the forms the shape,” lead author Jiri Bruthans asserts in the Smithsonian article. “Erosion processes are mere tools controlled by stress.”  The BBC quotes Bruthans comparing the stress field to Michelangelo.  “The stress field is the master sculptor – it tells the weather where to pick.”Not much is said in any of the articles about how long it takes for arches to form.  The Smithsonian says:The Czech team wanted to take a different approach. While doing fieldwork in Strelec quarry in the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin, they noticed that small arches and pillars—only about 2 feet high at most—formed out of the sandstone over mere months or years, rather than the millennial time scales associated with large geologic architecture.The BBC News, though, without a reference, says “The process had proved difficult to study, because natural slabs of sandstone erode over millions of years.”Landscape Arch, by David CoppedgeCreationists like Michael Oard have shown how just a few centuries since the Flood are sufficient (Creation.com, 2010) to form arches.  He quotes secular authors who estimate only tens of thousands of years, not millions, for their formation; in fact, Oard argues, too much time is problematic: the arches should be long gone after even tens of thousands of years.  Dr. Andrew Snelling, creation geologist, agrees, discussing sandstone arches briefly in the latest Answers Research Journal from AiG (July 2014).  “What the park rangers won’t tell you,” Snelling says, is that 43 sandstone arches have collapsed since 1970.  “Their loss is a sober reminder how delicate—and recent—these formations are,” he ends, after providing a Flood model for their formation.  “Rapid processes created them and are now destroying them.”The Nature Geoscience paper is not clear on timeframes, so it is not clear the new theory can speak to the age issue.  For the huge arches that were not observed forming, one can only estimate, considering variables and unknowns.  Did arches form under steady-state processes vs one-time processes (like the Flood)?  What were historical rainfall and wind patterns?  You can’t look at erosion in a desert today and simply assume it’s always been so slow.  It’s possible, in fact, to calculate reasonable upper limits on age of arches by taking conservative erosion rates today, and seeing how far back they can be extrapolated.  If those rule out the “millions of years” interpretation, they show old ages to be a philosophical bias, not a conclusion from the evidence.Two other conclusions can be drawn from this story, though.  One is the use of arches for design inference.  What’s the difference between Landscape Arch pictured above, and the St. Louis Arch?  Clearly the former is natural, and the latter intelligently designed.  Beyond intuition, how can we tell?  Use of such pithy examples can help teachers convey the principles of intelligent design.  (Note: Comparing stress fields to Michelangelo is a personification fallacy.)The other conclusion is that scientific theories are at best tentative, especially when they try to speak of the unobservable past.  The new theory  is partly empirical, because these scientists were able to reproduce some features in the lab.  But can one really scale up a small lab model by several orders of magnitude?  Other factors might intrude at that level.  For what it’s worth, the new theory overturns decades of thought and assumption about how these beautiful structures form, reminding us that science is, at best, a fallible human enterprise.  Remember this story when you read the authoritative-sounding National Park signs.last_img read more

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Haryana varsity suspends 13 students

first_imgThirteen students of the Central University of Haryana (CUH) in Mahendergarh were suspended on Thursday for allegedly creating “hindrance in the smooth functioning of academic and administrative functioning of the university”. The suspended students, including 11 BTech students, and others have been on strike since the past 10 days against lack of infrastructure and staff in the School of Engineering and Technology.Misbehaviour alleged The suspension came a few hours after the agitating students — who were protesting against alleged misbehaviour by security guards with female students on Wednesday night — prevented Vice-Chancellor R.C. Kuhad from leaving the premises in his car. They claimed the security guards used force on Wednesday to disperse students, including women, who were holding a peaceful protest outside the university’s Academic Block. They added that the guards also tore posters, prompting hundreds of students to hold a protest all night. The agitating students alleged that varsity officials misbehaved with them on Thursday and locked the building from inside to prevent them from entering the premises to drink water and relieve themselves.‘Baseless claims’Dismissed as “baseless” the allegations of misbehaviour by the guards, CUH spokesperson Shailender Kumar accused the students of manhandling the V-C. He claimed CUH had agreed to meet their demands in a time-bound manner and a notice in this regard was already circulated on April 15. Lack of facilitiesThe students are on strike since April 9, alleging that two years after the School of Engineering and Technology was established in 2016, it still lacks minimum facilities like laboratories, building and regular staff. The School offers BTech in four disciplines. However, a student of BTech (electrical engineering) said promises made by the administration were hollow. “We want a letter signed by the V-C himself with a promise to meet all our demands in a time-bound manner. We believed the verbal assurances of the V-C last August but nothing happened. How can we believe the administration that laboratories will be ready in three months when construction of building is yet to start?” said the student. CUH Finance Officer Sanjeev Kumar said the university’s notice to meet the demands of students in a time-bound manner had the approval of the V-C and was signed by the Registrar. “It seems that some people are instigating the students. The students seemed satisfied after a marathon meeting with the V-C on Wednesday but were instigated into continuing the protest. They are coming up with new demands every other day,” said Mr. Kumar.He added that approval of the All-India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) was not required for BTech courses as the university was autonomous body and received grants from the University Grants Commission.last_img read more

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Bill proposes reference to rights of Indigenous Peoples in citizenship oath

first_imgThe Canadian PressImmigration Minister Ahmed Hussen has introduced a bill that would change Canada’s oath of citizenship to include a reference to the rights of Indigenous Peoples.The Liberal government says the proposal demonstrates its commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and a renewed relationship based on the recognition of rights, respect and co-operation.Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett says the change demonstrates to all Canadians, including the country’s newest citizens, that Indigenous and Treaty Rights are an essential part of the country’s character.The bill contains new language for the oath that includes a pledge for new citizens to faithfully observe the laws of Canada including the Constitution, which “recognizes and affirms the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights of First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples.”The proposed change is also part of the Liberal government’s response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which spent six years probing Canada’s residential-school legacy before it issued 94 calls for action.Sen. Murray Sinclair, who chaired the commission, says he welcomes the government’s legislation to change the oath, saying it reflects a “more inclusive history of Canada.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

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