Pakistan humble West Indies in Dubai

first_imgDUBAI, United Arab Emirates, (CMC): Reigning World champions West Indies were humbled by Pakistan in the opening Twenty20 International here yesterday, after virtually condemning themselves with a feeble batting effort at the Dubai International Stadium. Sent in, they recovered from a shocking position of 48 for eight in the 12th over to stumble to 115 all out with a ball remaining in the innings, and Pakistan wasted little time in cruising to their target in the 15th over, to complete an uncomplicated nine-wicket victory and take a valuable 1-0 lead in the three-match series. Veteran all-rounder Dwayne Bravo was the only one to emerge from the encounter with any semblance of pride, striking a top score of 55 from 54 balls under pressure. Spinner destroys WI The damage was done by left-arm spinner Imad Wasim, who ripped through the innings with a Man-of-the-Match spell of five for 14 from his four overs. In reply, Pakistan never looked in danger of botching their run chase and Babar Azam made sure of this with a fluent unbeaten 55 off 37 deliveries. In only his second T20 International, the right-hander smashed six fours and two sixes and posted a match-winning, unbroken 88-run, second wicket stand with opener Khalid Latif who made a patient 34 not out from 32 balls. With the second T20 International scheduled for today at the same venue, West Indies were left with several problems to solve in a short space of time. Without the experience of axed captain Darren Sammy and the unavailable Chris Gayle and AndrÈ Russell, West Indies stumbled and stuttered from the outset. Imad became the first Pakistani spinner to take a five-wicket haul in T20s. When Sunil Narine (1) failed to beat Latif’s direct hit from mid-off on a badly judged quick single, West Indies were in a deep hole but Bravo bailed them out with a quality knock which included four fours and two sixes. He started slowly with his first 18 runs requiring 32 balls but accelerated to reach his fourth T20I half-century off 50 balls. He took 13 runs from the 15th over bowled by Tanvir and combined with Tylor to garner 19 from the following over from seamer Hasan Ali – the most expensive over of the innings. Bravo raised his half-century in the 19th over by clearing the ropes at cover with left-arm pacer Wahab Riaz but perished in the deep off the penultimate delivery of the innings, with West Indies desperately chasing runs. The Windies then needed an early breakthrough to remain in the game but none came, as Sharjeel Khan hammered three fours and a six in a 17-ball 22, to dominate an opening stand of 28 with Latif. And even when he bowled by leg-spinner Samuel Badree in the fourth over, Latif and Babar kept Pakistan on course with positive stroke-play.last_img read more

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2007 homes market looks a lot like ’96

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Most of the big home sales and price reports for the first month of 2007 are in, and this year is looking a lot like 1996, sort of. Home sales will probably stay under the 1,000 level every month this year, just like they did in 1996. Price is where the two years differ though. Back in 1996 the year started with the median price home of $164,000 in the San Fernando Valley. This year started with a price 273.8 percent higher – $613,000. OK, one month doesn’t make a trend, but the evidence seems compelling that at least sales in 2007 will more closely track 1996 than any other year. Since 1984, every year but five has featured at least one month when Valley residents bought 1,000. And 2006 was one of those five years. “When we get to the end of this year, our feeling is we’ll find a market with about the same sales as last year and the median price up 5 or 6 percent,” said Jim Link, executive vice president of the Southland Regional Association of Realtors in Van Nuys. Home sales have now fallen for 16 consecutive months, though January’s was the smallest decline of this current down market. The numbers now hint that the biggest price declines are behind us. “I think quite honestly we have enough time under our belts to realize that this is a trend, and it’s going to continue this way,” Link said. “The market seems to have found a level.” Daniel Blake, director of the Economic Research Center at California State University, Northridge, concurs. “The sales were going to drop, then sort of level off. That’s what it looks like to us.” There’s still weakness in the market, though. Blake said that notices of default, the first step in the foreclosure process, are about 30 percent higher than a year ago. The actual foreclosure rate, in which a person loses a home, is about one in four. The California Budget Project notes that the slump has already taken a toll on some real estate-related sectors. Last week it issued a report showing that the slowdown is having a like impact on personal income growth and consumer spending. It’s not doing any forecasting, though. “We look at the past, we don’t predict the future,” said Jean Ross, the project’s executive director. “The take-home message for us is when you look at the housing sector’s contribution to job growth in the early years of the decade and look at the current environment, there are widespread implications.” For example, in the decade’s first five years, 61.7 percent of California’s non-farm job growth came from three housing-related industries – residential construction, residential speciality trade contracting and real estate. But they accounted for just 3.7 percent of the state’s jobs. In the preceding five years, these three sectors accounted for 6.8 percent of California’s job growth, the report said. And the surge of housing-related jobs from 2000 to 2005 helped offset weakness in other sectors. The report also found that job growth slowed last year, reflecting a deflating housing market, and it dampened the nation’s economic growth. This news didn’t resonate with everyone, though. “This is sort of, `OK, we know this news. Why bother?’ is sort of my response,” said Jack Kyser, vice president and chief economist at the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. “Construction employment has slowed, but you are seeing other sectors pick up the beat.” Kyser said some big nonresidential construction projects are now under way (l.a.livenext to Staples Center) or recently approved (Grand Avenue project downtown) and this will ease the pressure from the housing slowdown. And Stephen Levy, director of the Center For Continuing Study of the California Economy, doesn’t see long-term fallout from the housing market slowdown. “I think that is a problem for this year. I think we will see some job losses, but what’s been fortunate so far is that throughout the state we’ve been able to offset them,” he said. In other words, sales may continue at an anemic pace but the patient will eventually recover. It’s the “when” that remains unclear. greg.wilcox@dailynews.com (818) 713-3743 last_img
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