Japanese Grant Assistance Produces Professional Carpenters

first_imgMr. Eduardo Moeira of UNIDO and LCU president Toure.Whoever said that “if you give a hungry man a fish, you feed him for a day, but if you teach him how to fish, you feed him for a lifetime,” might have had an idea why the Japanese Government decided to provide development assistance to Liberia, after the deadly Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the country.The Japanese government realized that Liberia is still on its way to recovery from a 14-year civil war and the recent outbreak of Ebola that seriously affected the country’s path to reconstruction, leaving Liberians heavily reliant on transnational corporations (TNC) for the country’s economy.However, the Japanese government has realized that unemployment is unavailable to unskilled and semi-skilled workers and that TNC’s contribution towards creating job opportunities as well as poverty reduction has been limited. “Conflict against TNC’s has been frequently observed in concession project-affected communities (PAC).”Hence, the Japanese government, in its supplementary budget year (2016), with the implementing period (March 27-June, 2018) through UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization), in the amount of US$597,000, initiated a project that aims to promote social stabilization by improving human security of the vulnerable people and communities affected by crises in close coordination with TNCs.The activities include carpentry and Entrepreneurship Development Program (EDP) training. The project sites are Monrovia and Margibi County; it is expected to enhance socioeconomic resilience and provide a means out of poverty.Several hundred Liberian youth, who have worked along with the Liberia Carpentry Union (LCU), have been assisted to develop their skills in carpentry, while some of their leaders have gained training in Japan, under Japanese government’s assistance.According to Mohammad Toure, president of the LCU, the Japanese government’s assistance has been tremendous. “We chose 60 young people from communities that are near concessionaire areas, such as Margibi, Grand Bassa, and Montserrado counties where 300 young men were trained, with 55 of them well established.”He said with the improved work of their members to provide quality furniture, the Liberian government should implement a policy that gives Liberian carpenters the opportunity to supply 25 percent of furniture bought for ministries and agencies of government.“We want a showroom where we can display our products so that Liberians can see what we are capable of doing,” Toure said. He commended the Government of Japan for carving a pathway for Liberians who are prepared to learn carpentry and get themselves out of poverty.Toure told the Daily Observer that his Union is dialoguing with authorities of the Ministry of Commerce to work out an MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) with the promise that through the Japanese assistance, Liberian carpenters will provide any quality furniture imaginable for the local market.He said at present, at least 400 Liberians, including females, have gone through a system of education, using the Booker Washington Institute (BWI). While regretting that there are challenges, Toure believes that once the Ministry of Commerce (MoC) can show the political will to empower them with their demands, LCU members will have a sustainable route out of poverty.Mohamed S. Turay, vice president of the LCU, told journalists that he was opportune to travel to Japan with assistance from the Japanese government. “What I learned in Japan has motivated me a lot and I am imparting the knowledge to young people who are passionate about learning carpentry,” he said. The carpentry project is led by UNIDO, with Eduardo Moreira as the project’s technical advisor.“We want to appeal to the Japanese government to resume its assistance so that we can continue to develop our capacity as a way of getting many young Liberians out of grinding poverty,” Turay said.Japan provides approximately a US$3M grant assistance for grassroots human security projects in Liberia (2012-2018).Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Close Look at Young Star Finds a Chemical Surprise

first_imgThe basics of star formation are easy. Find an unusually dense region within a molecular cloud filled with dust and gas in interstellar space and let gravity do the rest. The gas and dust will eventually coalesce into a doughnut-shaped envelope that encircles an inner rotating disk. As material accumulates over hundreds of thousands of years, the central region collapses into a star while the disk solidifies into planets.Astronomers have understood this overall scenario for decades, but the details are fuzzy because telescopes haven’t been good enough to check theorists’ computer models. That changed in 2011 with the partial completion of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The collection of radio antennas is being erected on the Chajnantor Plain, 5000 meters above sea level in the Chilean Andes, where the dry, sparse air causes minimal distortion of the faint waves from the far reaches of the universe. Using 24 of the antennas—the final array will have 66—an international group led by astrophysicists at the University of Tokyo, has taken the most detailed look yet at the heart of a star-forming region and found a chemical surprise.The researchers trained ALMA on a very young star still forming in the constellation Taurus, about 450 light-years from Earth. As is typical at such an early stage, the star is encircled by an envelope and disk of gas and dust. The new scope’s power enabled the team to identify the chemical composition of the gases at different locations throughout this star- and planet-forming system. Previously, astronomers thought that the envelope and disk must be made up of the same gaseous molecules of hydrogen found throughout interstellar space plus dust particles made up of other elements. To the surprise of the University of Tokyo group, ALMA detected something different—sulfur monoxide gas—in a narrow band where the envelope meets the disk. Collisions between particles in the envelope and those in the rapidly spinning disk generate heat that thaws frozen sulfur monoxide molecules stuck to dust grains, explains Nami Sakai, an astrophysicist at the University of Tokyo. Sulfur monoxide can’t be detected when it is frozen to dust grains. But ALMA can spot it in its gaseous state. Knowing just what gases are swirling around young stars should lead to a better understanding of where and how elements found in planets, comets, and asteroids are formed. Sakai and colleagues report their findings online today at Nature.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)”These are beautiful data and very interesting results,” says Ewine van Dishoeck, an astrophysicist at the Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands. “This work shows that ALMA will provide ample observational evidence” that will challenge theoretical models, adds astrophysicist Stéphane Guilloteau of University of Bordeaux in France. “This paper is a beautiful example of the new discovery [capabilities] offered by ALMA.”last_img read more

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