Kroos Scores Late to Give Germany 2-1 Win over Sweden

first_imgSOCHI, Russia (AP) — The desperate world champions from Germany were seconds from losing control of their World Cup fate when Toni Kroos whispered to Marco Reus just outside Sweden’s penalty area.With the score tied in the fifth minute of stoppage time, Kroos seemed to remind Reus of a tricky set play from training that will live in World Cup lore.Down to 10 men after Jerome Boateng was given a second yellow card, Germany rallied for a 2-1 victory over Sweden on Saturday to suddenly revive its title defense thanks to a strike from Kroos that caught the Swedes by surprise and won’t soon be forgotten in Germany.“The fact Toni Kroos put it away is just incredible,” Reus said. “He’s shown that talent on previous occasions but really in this case it was practically the very last opportunity to win this match.”Kroos lined up for a free kick as if he was going for goal but just tapped the ball to Reus, who held it with his toe as the defenders paused. Kroos swung his right foot, curling the ball past a spinning Sebastian Larsson and over the outstretched hand of diving goalkeeper Robin Olsen.The Swedes watched the ball go in, mouths open in disbelief.The Germans ran to Kroos and erupted in emotional relief.Sweden’s Andreas Granqvist, left, and teammate Andreas Granqvist gestures during the group F match between Germany and Sweden at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, Saturday, June 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)“Happy of course. It was a tough game again today for us,” Kroos said. “We suffered. … If you don’t score an early goal and we have the chances then it’s going to be difficult until the end. It was, but now of course we’re happy because I think we also deserved the victory.”Coming off an opening loss to Mexico, Germany fell behind again when Kroos’ early mistake led to Ola Toivonen’s goal in the 32nd minute. Reus equalized in the 48th. A point for a draw would have been enough to stay alive for the knockout stage, but the Germans would have needed help on the final day.Now Germany has some control of what happens. Mexico leads Group F with six points, and Germany and Sweden both have three. Mexico faces Sweden and Germany takes on winless South Korea in the final group matches.“Of course this was a thriller, full of emotions and a rollercoaster ride right up until the final whistle,” Germany coach Joachim Loew said.Crazy as it seems, all four teams still have a chance to advance on the final day.“There’s nothing strange to get ready for that match,” Sweden coach Janne Andersson said. “We still have an excellent opportunity to qualify.”For 90-plus minutes, Germany looked as if it would enter the final match facing the same possible fate as Spain and Italy and potentially become the third straight defending champion to fail to reach the knockout stage. They played the final 10 minutes without Boateng.Toivonen gave Sweden the lead, but Germany controlled every aspect by playing aggressive and attacking soccer. Germany forced Sweden to play defensively for almost the entire second half and eventually the attack paid off.Germany’s Toni Kroos celebrates after scoring his side’s second goal with his teammate Germany’s Antonio Ruediger, left, and Marco Reus, right, during the group F match between Germany and Sweden at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, Saturday, June 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)“Something that I did appreciate today was that we didn’t lose our nerve, we didn’t panic after going down after conceding a goal,” Loew said. “We kept a level head.”Reus scored to pull Germany even, finishing Timo Werner’s cross that was tapped by halftime substitute Mario Gomez and caused the ball to pop up perfectly for Reus to finish with his leg.Olsen made a major save by stopping Gomez’s header in the 88th minute and Julian Brandt hit the post in the 90th, but he had no chance at Kroos’ strike.“This is probably heaviest conclusion that I’ve experienced in my career,” Andersson said.AFTER THE WHISTLESweden’s bench took issue with the way some Germany staff members celebrated after the final whistle. There was a confrontation between members of both teams on the sideline at midfield and the two groups had to be separated. Loew said he didn’t see “any gestures or aggressive gestures” directed at the Swedes.Andersson said he was annoyed by what he saw from the German celebration.“People behaved in ways that you don’t do,” Andersson said. “You cheer together, maybe, and you leave your opponents to feel sad, and that is the end of it.”NO OZILGermany coach Joachim Loew showed he wasn’t willing to stay with the status quo, making four changes to his starting lineup. One was due to necessity after central defender Mats Hummels injured his neck in training on Thursday.The surprise was Loew dropping Mesut Ozil from the starting lineup in favor of Reus.It was the first time Ozil was dropped from the lineup in a major international championship in his senior career. He started every game at the 2010 World Cup and was one of the stars of Germany’s winning squad in Brazil four years ago.“It was important to give Ozil a break today,” Loew said.INJURIESGermany midfielder Sebastian Rudy broke his nose when he was caught by the foot of a Swedish player in the first half, Loew said. Rudy had to be replaced by Ilkay Gundogan.GROUP DYNAMICSThe victory puts the Germans back on track to advance to the knockout stage if it can get a win against South Korea and have a better goal differential than the Swedes or Mexico depending on the outcome of their final match.Even if it does advance, Germany may be looking at being the No. 2 team from the group and potentially a matchup with Brazil in the round of 16.—By TIM BOOTH , AP Sports WriterSweden’s Viktor Claesson, left, challenges Germany’s Toni Kroos during the group F match between Germany and Sweden at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, Saturday, June 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)Blood drips from the nose of Germany’s Sebastian Rudy during the group F match between Germany and Sweden at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, Saturday, June 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Continue reading

Email use model appears to follow Clash of Civilizations prediction

first_img Citation: E-mail use model appears to follow “Clash of Civilizations” prediction (2013, March 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-e-mail-clash-civilizations.html (Phys.org) —Researchers at Stanford University have built a model based on the frequency of e-mail interactions between groups of users of Yahoo! e-mail throughout the world. In studying their results, they have found, as they report in their paper they’ve uploaded to the preprint server arXiv, it appears to adhere to societal boundaries as described by Samuel Huntington’s 1992 book “The Clash of Civilizations.” The Mesh of Civilizations. Source: Yahoo! email dataset. Rescaled densities. Only top 1,000 densities displayed. Credit: arxiv.org/abs/1303.0045 Journal information: arXiv Yahoo tries to entice users with e-mail facelift More information: The Mesh of Civilizations and International Email Flows, arXiv:1303.0045 [cs.SI] arxiv.org/abs/1303.0045AbstractIn The Clash of Civilizations, Samuel Huntington argued that the primary axis of global conflict was no longer ideological or economic but cultural and religious, and that this division would characterize the “battle lines of the future.” In contrast to the “top down” approach in previous research focused on the relations among nation states, we focused on the flows of interpersonal communication as a bottom-up view of international alignments. To that end, we mapped the locations of the world’s countries in global email networks to see if we could detect cultural fault lines. Using IP-geolocation on a worldwide anonymized dataset obtained from a large Internet company, we constructed a global email network. In computing email flows we employ a novel rescaling procedure to account for differences due to uneven adoption of a particular Internet service across the world. Our analysis shows that email flows are consistent with Huntington’s thesis. In addition to location in Huntington’s “civilizations,” our results also attest to the importance of both cultural and economic factors in the patterning of inter-country communication ties.via Arxiv Blogcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2013 Phys.org Huntington famously suggested in his book that future wars would revolve around cultural and religious differences and even offered a list of groups of people in them: Sinic, Hindu, Islamic, Latin American, Western, Orthodox, African and Buddhist.The researchers at Stanford, led by Bogdan State, didn’t set out to create a model that would reflect Huntington’s vision, but instead found it came about on its own after the data was compiled and graphed. Their model is based on over ten million e-mail messages sent from Yahoo! users the world over. To show the degree of interaction between groups, the team used nodes and lines between them—the more transactions between groups, the closer they appear together on the model. They also carefully note that only Yahoo! users that agreed to have their data used in the study were included. To form geographic areas, the team compared IP numbers attached to messages with the location noted in a user’s profile, using only those that coincided.The resulting color-coded graphic model offers near instant visual clues regarding groups bound together by culture and perhaps religion. Perhaps more importantly it also shows boundaries, which State and his team claim, resemble the model first proposed by Huntington. Western nodes are clustered to form a single group with just a few outliers, for example, as are others such as those deemed Islamic, or South American.The model doesn’t hint at tensions between groups of course, but does seem to indicate that groups tend to communicate more via e-mail with others in their same group than they do with others from other groups, even if they share a physical border. Other patterns that show up indicate what would seem natural—that people who speak the same language tend to send more e-mails to each other than to people who don’t. People in Great Britain for example, appear to send more e-mails to people in Australia than to people in other, much closer, European countries. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Continue reading

Spanish telco Telefónica has unveiled its Spanish

first_imgSpanish telco Telefónica has unveiled its Spanish football programming line-up but has yet to strike a deal with Catalan broadcaster Mediapro to carry its BeIN Sports channel, giving it access to European Champions League and Europa League matches as well as coverage of European and international leagues.The Liga Adelante offering on Telefónica’s Movistar+ service will include coverage of La Liga matches in HD, with 11 fixtures daily to be aired on the Canal+ Liga.Telefónica is also introducing eight-camera coverage of matches, with two mini-cameras providing coverage of the changing rooms of the teams for the final three minutes before they go out onto the field.The telco will also provide multiscreen coverage via Yomvi and the Movistar+ Fútbol App.Telefónica has yet to strike a deal with Mediapro to include BeIN Sports as part of its offering, despite the latter being available via the services of rival telcos Vodafone and Orange and Asturias region cable operator Telecable.According to sports news website Palco23, citing unnamed sources familiar with the negotiations, talks are stalled over the question of Mediapro’s demand for minimum guaranteed payments.last_img read more

Continue reading