Search for San Diego Police Departments next police chief

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman, San Diego Police Department FacebookTwitter January 16, 2018 Steve Bosh Steve Bosh, Posted: January 16, 2018center_img Updated: 10:12 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The process for selecting San Diego’s next police chief has come under fire by some community groups who say there needs to be more than an advisory role for the public in choosing a new chief.Eighteen community leaders and six other members from city boards and commissions make up the advisory group that’s interviewing the candidates.Their information will then go to the search firm hired to oversee the process.Critics of the process see a lack of transparency because the members of the advisory panel will remain secret and the public will not have a chance to question the three finalists for the job.This is about the public’s safety and two audits of the police department, one by the Justice Department and one by San Diego State, found flaws in how the department has handled internal problems, citizen complaints and problematic behavior such as racial profiling. Critics of the process want to confront the finalists on these concerns and they want to know the identity of the panel members.“If they are members of the community or not, and having that open process everybody can see and know that there’s real transparency, you know it leaves us in the dark, and therefore we can’t trust the process,” said Cornelius Bowser of Alliance San Diego.The Mayor’s Office said naming the panelists would open the process up to lobbying by special interest groups.There have been several community forums for public input and an online survey. But again, these are advisory. The process follows the city charter, the mayor appoints a chief with approval from the council. Councilmember Chris Cate said calling it a secret panel is unfortunate.“What I do appreciate though is that the city and the mayor’s office is gonna be holding community hearings to hear feedback, the online survey will allow people to provide feedback,” said Chris Cate back in October of last year.Becky Hunt of one of those critics.“I would like to see one that there is no more racial profiling. That bothers me,” Hunt said.Tony Thomas suggests the ultimate public input is a vote of the people.“There are certain things that they don’t let us vote on,” Thomas said.In his state of the city address, Mayor Faulconer spent a few minutes on the city’s new contract with the cops to keep the department competitive in recruiting and retaining officers.Mayor Faulconer didn’t mention the controversy over the search for a new chief except to say, “Our next police chief will help to keep our city one of the safest cities in the nation.”The process has three stages: The selection of the 24-panel members, reducing the candidates to three and the mayor interviewing the three finalists. The process outlined by the mayor’s office says they are in phase three. Search for San Diego Police Department’s next police chieflast_img read more

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Houston Educators Push Back Against Proposed Salary Freeze

first_img Trustee Sergio Lira, Houston Federation of Teachers President Zeph Capo and several educators joined the press conference.Capo emphasized that if Houston schools improved enough to avoid a state-mandated takeover, it’s because of teachers.“And this is not the way to welcome them back to a new year when we need them focused the most on doing the best for our kids with the least,” Capo said.Santos said that she believes the $2 billion budget, which the board approved at the end of July, can cover the $6 million needed for the raises, if district administrators account for the departure of veteran, higher paid teachers.Lucia Moreno, who teaches at Rucker Elementary, said that she has to use her own money to buy equipment like cameras that her students need and her school can’t afford. Now she wonders how she’ll be able to pay for students’ supplies without an expected pay bump of about $1,000.“So where does that money come? They wind up losing. Who loses? Our kids in the East End,” Moreno said.The Houston school board is expected to vote on the compensation plan at its meeting next week. Laura IsenseeTrustee Elizabeth Santos told reporters that she believes the HISD budget can cover $6 million in scheduled raises for teachers.Dozens of educators spoke out against the proposed pay freeze at the Houston district headquarters Thursday afternoon, saying it’s not the way to “welcome” teachers back to school.Houston school board member and teacher Elizabeth Santos said that her fellow educators were shocked to find out that the administration at the Houston Independent School District wants to freeze their salaries for this school year — and not give anyone scheduled raises.“It’s simply not right to tell teachers that their pay is being cut days before they return to their classrooms for the new school year,” Santos said. “Beyond that, it’s not smart. As a district, we must ensure we don’t lose our most valuable asset for educating our children — experienced classroom teachers.” Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:center_img X 00:00 /00:53 Sharelast_img read more

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KMC issues showcause notice to senior official

first_imgKOLKATA: The Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) has issued showcause notice to a senior official, on charges of dereliction of duty.Though there has not been heavy rainfall in Kolkata, several streets, roads and lanes in the Kidderpore-Mominpur area are still under water. Local people have urged civic authorities to take immediate steps and sought the intervention of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee.Tarak Singh, Member, Mayor-in-Council (Drainage), along with municipal commissioner Khalil Ahmed and other senior officials of the Drainage department, went to Mominpur pumping station and talked to the officials about the delay in clearing the accumulated water. Senior KMC officials found that Sanjay Mondol, assistant engineer of the pumping station, had not taken appropriate steps to clear the water. He has been issued a showcause notice. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsSingh assured that water from the affected areas will be cleared by Thursday morning. He reiterated that the KMC is ready to face monsoon. Even if it rains heavily, some streets in the city will be flooded but the duration of waterlogging will be less than the previous years. It had rained heavily from Monday night and some streets got waterlogged. But the accumulated water from the streets, including the low lying areas of Bhowanipore, Kalighat and Chetla, got cleared by Tuesday evening. Singh said all the 35 heavy duty pumps installed in KMC’s pumping stations, are functioning.last_img read more

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Why superstitions are hard to shake

first_imgDo you forward a chain mail even though you know fully well that your action would not bring any promised luck? This is because you might consider the costs of ignoring rationality is low relative to the costs of ignoring intuition, suggests new research.The researchers found that detecting an irrational thought and correcting that error are two separate processes, not one as most dual-system cognitive models assume. This insight explains how people can detect irrational thought and choose not to correct it, a process described as ‘acquiescence’ in the study. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Even when the conditions are all perfect for detecting an error, when people have the ability and motivation to be rational and when the context draws attention to the error, the magical intuition may still prevail,” said researcher Jane Risen from University of Chicago Booth School of Business in the US.Understanding how acquiescence unfolds in magical thinking, can help provide insight into how it is that people knowingly behave irrationally in many other areas of life, the study said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixCertain variables create situations in which intuition is likely to override rational thought. For example, people may acquiesce if they can rationalise their intuition by thinking that a particular situation is special. Acquiescence may also be more likely if the costs of ignoring rationality are low relative to the costs of ignoring intuition, the researchers said.The findings will be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Psychological Review.last_img read more

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Teaching Girls to Code

first_img 5 min read February 1, 2013 Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. A failed congressional campaign inspired attorney Reshma Saujani to start Girls Who Code, a non-profit in New York that seeks to address the gender gap in technology.Saujani, an Indian-American child of political refugees, launched her underdog campaign in 2010, motivated by Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential run. While she didn’t win, the support she received from other women pushed her to “pay it forward.” During her campaign, she’d learned that job growth came from technology – but only a small, mostly male fraction of the U.S. work force could fill those jobs. “As a nation, we’re missing out not just on innovation, but the innovation of an entire gender,” she says. “Our country depends on teaching girls to get into these fields.”Taking her renewed passion for public service, Saujani last summer launched Girls Who Code, training underprivileged teenage girls in computer science. She recruited executives at Twitter, GE and eBay to support the program. This year, with a $435,000 grant by the Knight Foundation, she plans to expand Girls Who Code to three cities, and eventually launch Girls Who Code clubs in schools.Saujani was recently named a Next MAKER by Makers.com, which honors trailblazing women leaders across the globe, joining the ranks of Madeleine Albright, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, and her mentor, Clinton. She’s now a candidate for New York City Public Advocate, running on a platform focused on supporting small businesses and entrepreneurs.Edited interview excerpts follow.Entrepreneur: Will training and mentoring girls in tech have more of a social impact or economic impact?Saujani: They’re intertwined. If we teach a million girls to code by 2020, there will be a tangible change in the economic future – more jobs, less pay inequity. There’s an access issue in this country. In NYC, 76 percent of public school students don’t have access to a computer in school. So students are missing a fundamental language that we use in business. Socially, there is a huge impact. When girls build, they make things to improve their community.Entrepreneur: Do you know how to code?Saujani: I wish I did! I was always intimidated by math and science growing up and I still am now. I don’t want other girls to feel as I did. I wish I could build an app. Even as I run for office, it’d be great if I could make changes to my website myself. There’s a vulnerability that comes with not knowing. That is true for small-business owners as well. Think about the small family restaurant down the street — if everyone else is on Seamless and she’s not, how does she compete?Related: PopTech’s Andrew Zolli on Resilience and Solving World ProblemsEntrepreneur: Has the tech community been supportive of nurturing girls?Saujani: Yes. Both men and women have come out to support us. My relationship with the CEO of Twitter evolved because I reached out to the women of Twitter networking group. They helped recruit other female engineers and entrepreneurs to support us. Men support us because they have daughters, and they see that computer science education isn’t happening in school.Entrepreneur: Are young women less interested in becoming tech entrepreneurs than young men are? Is that a myth?Saujani: We make it true by saying it. If we encourage girls to take risks like we do for boys, there will be more gender parity in entrepreneurship. We have to start encouraging our girls to fail fast, fail hard and fail often. Girls Who Code is a natural place for this. I saw the confidence level in our girls enormously increase in the eight weeks of the program. In the beginning, they could hardly introduce themselves. By the end we had them making presentations in a room of 100 people and doing science fairs at the New York Stock Exchange. They were not the same girls they were when they started. We shouldn’t have a creative culture or society that makes it more acceptable for men to fail than women.Entrepreneur: Was it difficult to recover from your congressional race?Saujani: I gave myself two months to mourn it and ask questions of what went wrong during the campaign. Putting together a campaign is like starting a business — you learn about how to hire, how to run your budget, what your message is, what your mission is.Related: The ‘White African’ and Nairobi’s Tech HubEntrepreneur: Is failure now part of the zeitgeist of our culture?Saujani: The economy has changed so significantly that if you ask young people what they want to do, they want to become entrepreneurs. Failure is part of that. If you are passionate and smart and you have an idea and you fail, it doesn’t preclude you from doing anything else. Exploring these things is about finding your dharma and figuring out what you’re put on this earth to do.Entrepreneur: How do you find your dharma?Saujani: The best test: Do you bound out of bed in the morning? I don’t sleep enough, but I jump out of bed every morning. I love what I’m doing, I love Girls Who Code and I love running for office. I did not feel that way for most of my career. I was curled up in the fetal position for most of my career! What are you getting out of your work? What are you losing? Do the cost benefit analysis of sticking with something that you don’t love, and see if it’s worth it to you. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

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