Cynthia Nixon Talks Going from Daughter to Mother in The Real Thing

first_img View Comments The Real Thing star Cynthia Nixon has quite the history with the Tom Stoppard play. In 1984, she appeared in the original production as Debbie (while simultaneously starring in Hulyburly two blocks up). Now, she stars in the Roundabout revival as Charlotte (Debbie’s mother). The Tony, Emmy and Grammy winner stopped by The Today Show on November 5 and shared that she’s still “e-mail buddies” with Christine Baranski, who played Charlotte back in 1984. The Sex and the City actress also addressed rumors of a second sequel, saying she’d be “thrilled for the opportunity” if it worked out. But the most shocking news? Nixon does not have a television in her house. However, she does have two Emmy Awards. Hmm. Take a look at the interview below! Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015 The Real Thinglast_img read more

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Lake Ronkonkoma Burglar Caught in Act, Cops Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Have you seen this burglar?A burglar got into a physical altercation when he was caught breaking into a house in Lake Ronkonkoma two weeks ago, Suffolk County police said Monday.The burglar kicked down the rear door of a house and when the homeowner’s relative went to check on the house, when a confrontation ensued and the suspect fled on foot Sunday, Jan.12, according to Sixth Squad detectives.Two suspects were caught on surveillance video inside the house. Police released images from that video in the hopes that someone will recognize them.One of the suspects was described as a white man in his late 20s or early 30s, 6-feet, 1-inch tall, 220 pounds with short brown hair. He was wearing a black sweatshirt, a black North Face knit hat and jeans.Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to an arrest.Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Great Neck Plaza Village Accused of Housing Discrimination

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Village of Great Neck Plaza officials allegedly broke the law by discriminating against affordable-housing applicants based on race, age and disability, a pair of fair-housing nonprofit advocacy groups alleged in a federal lawsuit they filed last week.The village set discriminatory requirements for residents seeking affordable housing units in a 94-unit rental development called the Maestro, according to the lawsuit filed by Long Island Housing Services (LIHS) and the Fair Housing Justice Center (FHJC). The suit also names the Nassau County Industrial Development Agency, which provided financial assistance to Plaza Landmark, the developer of the Maestro.“In general theory, without a neutral policy that is applied evenly, these laws tend to maintain the status quo,” said Erik Heins, the attorney for LIHS. “In this case, the racial proportions of the village and the surrounding peninsula are much less balanced than the rest of the county.”The village code outlines three categories of prospective residents, giving preference to residents of the village and residents of Great Neck Peninsula, both of which are predominately white, over residents of other areas of Nassau County. Seventy-eight percent of the village population and 74 percent of the peninsula population is non-Hispanic white, according to the 2010 U.S. Census.“Our primary goal is to make sure that these preferences do not prevent minorities from coming in,” said Diane Houk, the attorney for FHJC.The code also defines eligible residents in all three categories to be either under the age of 40 or over the age of 65. These requirements violate Nassau County law, Houk said.The lawsuit is based on a joint investigation conducted by the plaintiffs in 2013. The investigation found, in addition to the residency and age requirements, the village would not allow any applicant with disabilities to have a live-in home health care aide who was not related to the applicant.Attorneys for the village and county were not immediately available for comment.The lawsuit is the latest in several accusations of housing discrimination on Long Island. U.S. District Judge Arthur D. Spatt ruled in December that a Garden City zoning ordinance discriminated against minority residents. And the U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the Town of Oyster Bay in April over alleged discrimination in the town’s affordable housing programs.last_img read more

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