Husband and Wife arrested for stealing injuring man

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, April 19, 2017 – Providenciales – An alleged criminal couple was arrested by Police and charged with aggravated burglary and robbery.   A 36 year old woman and her 30 year old husband are the TCIs own ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ it appears as Police say in a report that the duo was caught with stolen goods and are their suspects in the case where a resident of Belgrade Gardens was pistol whipped and robbed of a Jamaican passport and his 2008 Nissan Skyline sedan.  The home invasion is from April 7, 2017 and led to the man being hospitalized with injuries.#MagneticMediaNews#husbandandwifearrestedinTCI#TCIBonnieandClyde Related Items:#husbandandwifearrestedinTCI, #magneticmedianews, #TCIBonnieandClyde Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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WHS Class Of 2003 Announce 15Year Reunion

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington High School Class of 2003 is celebrating its 15-Year Reunion on Saturday, November 24, 2018, from 7pm to 11pm, at the Wilmington Knights of Columbus Hall (downstairs).Tickets cost $5 at the door. Email any questions to KristieC@chchne.com.(Do you know of any other Wilmington High or Shawsheen Tech reunions coming up? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS Class Of 1969 Announces 50th Reunion On September 14In “Education”WHS Class Of 1979 Announces 40th Reunion On September 21In “Education”Shawsheen Tech Alumni Association Announces 3 Class ReunionsIn “Education”last_img read more

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Giant prehistoric lion fossil discovered hiding in museum drawer

first_img Sci-Tech Share your voice 59 Photos An artist’s rendering of Simbakubwa kutoaafrika, which lived 22 million years ago and had a huge skull, as large as a rhinoceros. Mauricio Anton Matthew Borths discovered a giant prehistoric lion on his lunch break.While examining drawers at the Nairobi National Museum in Kenya, Borths, a carnivore paleontologist, opened a drawer of Ice Age specimens and noticed a row of huge teeth staring back at him. He immediately realized the gigantic jaw was not an Ice Age specimen at all. A few years earlier, Nancy Stevens, a paleontologist at Ohio University, had opened the same drawer and noticed the same set of teeth.The fossils, which date back 22 million years, were originally unearthed when Kenyan researchers were scouring the African plains looking for ancient ape bones decades ago. They’d been hidden away in the wrong museum drawer for years. When Borth and Stevens came along, the duo quickly realized they had found a new species of prehistoric lion. The team were able to examine portions of the creature’s skull, its jaw and parts of its skeleton and discovered it is the oldest specimen of a group of mammals known as hyaenodonts.The new carnivore has been dubbed Simbakubwa kutoaafrika, which is Swahili for “big lion from Africa”. It is described in a study published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology on April 18, which suggests the beast was bigger than a polar bear and had canine teeth as big as an adult foot.borths-vs-simbakubwaDr. Matthew Borths shows off the giant jaw of Simbakubwa kutoaafrika. Matthew Borths The researchers believe that Simbakubwa was one of the apex predators of its era and although it is part of the hyaenodont group, it is unrelated to modern-day hyenas. “From its teeth, we can tell Simbakubwa was a hypercarnivore, which means its diet was over 70% meat,” says Borths. “Simbakubwa barely has any grinding surfaces on its teeth, so it wouldn’t have processed food that wasn’t meat very efficiently.”Their analysis suggests that these giant carnivores originated in Africa around 30 million years ago, moving further north over time, as the continents of Africa and Eurasia collided. At the same time, the ancient relatives of modern day cats, hyenas and dogs began to filter south.”It’s a fascinating time in biological history,” Borths says. “Lineages that had never encountered each other begin to appear together in the fossil record.”But Simbakubwa ultimately went extinct around 10 million years ago as global ecosystems shifted thanks to tectonic movement and changing climates. Borths and Stevens have been investigating why that might be, hoping to better inform present-day studies of how ecosystems respond to these sweeping changes.”Understanding large-scale patterns of how organisms respond to environmental change through time can offer insights into ecosystem fragility and resilience in the modern world,” explains Stevens.And to think, it would have remained off the fossil record entirely, if not for a Kenyan museum storing away the sample and some inquisitive paleontologists checking a few extra drawers.”Discoveries like this one underscore the importance of museums as troves of information about our planet’s past,” says Stevens. Tagscenter_img Take a bite out of ‘Jurassic World’ Lego (pictures) 1 Commentlast_img read more

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Crude oil prices may fall to 20 a barrel in coming months

first_imgGlobal glut and growth concerns may pressurize the crude oil market further, leading oil prices to fall to as low as $20 a barrel in coming months, according to a global brokerage firm.Brent oil prices fell nearly 2% or 71 cents to touch an 11-year low of $36.17 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange on Monday, while the US Benchmark West Texas Intermediate dropped 32 cents, or nearly 1%, to trade at $34.41 a barrel.The decline in oil prices comes on the back of growing concerns over the global growth, which could weigh on the oil demand in the coming months. A slowdown in demand may worsen the oversupply conditions that have been rattling the oil market since June 2014.”We reiterate our concern that ‘financial stress’ may prove too little too late to prevent the market from having to clear through ‘operational stress’ with prices near cash costs to force production cuts, likely around $20/barrel,” said Goldman Sachs in a note to its clients.”Our base case remains that the global oil stock build will on aggregate remain shy of storage capacity, although the storage buffer has once again narrowed. But this rebalancing is far from achieved…,” Business Standard quoted Damien Courvalin, Abhisek Banerjee, Raquel Ohana of Goldman Sachs, as saying in a report.Oil prices are also under pressure from an unchanged decision on production levels by the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) at its recent meeting. The oil cartel remains reluctant to cut the oil output, as it fears loss of market shares to other oil-exporting countries.”OPEC can’t take a unilateral decision, for example, to cut production and others … raise production. Either we all go to cut production to really defend prices or we have to wait and see,” Iraq’s oil minister Adel Abdul Mahdi told Reuters on Sunday.A slowdown in China and resumption in oil exports from Iran are also expected to keep oil prices lower for a prolonged period.last_img read more

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Modi urged to make reality match Make in India hype

first_imgThousands of people and lion mascots swarmed the weekend opening of a “Make in India” drive to attract foreign direct investment, pitched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi as “the biggest brand that India has ever created”.The week-long event, the boldest since Modi launched the initiative to emulate China’s export miracle back in 2014, got off to an inauspicious start when a huge fire engulfed the stage at a cultural event on Sunday. Nobody was hurt.Even as the Make in India hype scales new heights, some bosses questioned Modi’s delivery on promises to make it easier to do business, while marketing experts cautioned against creating unrealistic expectations.”When you over-communicate and you under-deliver, the biggest risk is that you begin to lose trust,” said Chandramouli Nilakantan, CEO of Blue Lotus Communications, a branding and public relations consultancy.On buzz alone, the effort got off to a great start, with the prime ministers of Sweden and Finland attending Saturday’s gala opening hosted by Modi.On Sunday, delegates thronged the 10 pavilions erected for the event in Mumbai, India’s financial capital. Around 2,500 foreign and 8,000 domestic companies were expected to attend, organisers said.Yet on the ground, the experience of businesses is more prosaic. Twenty months after Modi swept to power with a promise of growth and jobs for India’s 1.3 billion people, executives say more needs to be done, including improving infrastructure.More pressingly, key legislation such as a goods and services tax and land acquisition bill are stuck in parliament, just as global competitors such as Vietnam step up their own reform efforts.”Make in India is a great initiative and has created a lot of positive sentiments,” Vikas Agarwal, general manager of mobile phone maker OnePlus in India, told Reuters.”Now the government needs to follow up with policies. That includes providing custom duty and export incentives, tax rationalisation and removal of ambiguous land acquisition policies.”MAJOR WINSMake In India has scored major wins, including a pledge by Taiwan’s Foxconn to invest $5 billion in a new electronics manufacturing facility.That has helped foreign direct investment to nearly double to $59 billion last year, the seventh highest level in the world, according to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.Yet in critical aspects, India remains far behind its goals.The proportion of manufacturing to gross domestic product has been stuck at around 17 percent for five years, below the government’s goal to ramp it up to 25 percent, according to the Boston Consulting Group.India has only created 4 million manufacturing jobs since 2010, according to Boston Consulting. At the current rate, India may only create 8 million jobs by 2022, well below the government’s goal of 100 million.Professor Ravi Aron, a US-based expert in manufacturing, said India was ill-suited for a Chinese-style export boom, because it lacked the infrastructure and the skills for its exports to compete internationally.”It should not be called ‘Make in India’ but ‘Make In Spite of India’,” said Aron, of Johns Hopkins University, advising the Indian government to scale back its ambitions and focus on its growing domestic market.($1 = 68.2750 Indian rupees)last_img read more

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Nearthreshold computing could enable up to 100x reduction in power consumption

first_img Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. In a recent study, a team of researchers, Ronald Dreslinski, et al., from the University of Michigan, have investigated a solution to the power problem by using a method called near-threshold computing (NTC). In the NTC method, electronic devices operate at lower voltages than normal, which reduces energy consumption. The researchers predict that NTC could enable future computer systems to reduce energy requirements by 10 to 100 times or more, by optimizing them for low-voltage operation. Unfortunately, low-voltage operation also involves performance trade-offs: specifically, performance loss, performance variation, and memory and logic failures. Continuing Moore’s lawAs the researchers explain, reducing power consumption is essential for allowing the continuation of Moore’s law, which states that the number of transistors on a chip doubles about every two years. Continuing this exponential growth is becoming more and more difficult, and power consumption is the largest barrier to meaningful increases in chip density. While engineers can design chips to hold additional transistors, power consumption has begun to prohibit these devices from actually being used. As the researchers explain, engineers are currently facing “a curious design dilemma: more gates can now fit on a die, but a growing fraction cannot actually be used due to strict power limits. … It is not an exaggeration to state that developing energy-efficient solutions is critical to the survival of the semiconductor industry.” In the past, technologies that required large amounts of power eventually became replaced by more energy-efficient technologies; for example, vacuum tubes were replaced by transistors. Today, transistors are arranged using CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) circuitry design techniques. Since beyond-CMOS technologies are still far from being commercially viable, and large investments have been made in CMOS-based infrastructure, the Michigan researchers predict that CMOS will likely be around for a while. For this reason, solutions to the power problem must come from within. Using Moore’s law as the metric of progress has become misleading: starting around the 65-nm node, improvements in packing densities no longer translate to proportional increases in performance or energy efficiency. Researchers predict that near-threshold computing could restore the relationship between transistor density and energy efficiency. Credit: Dreslinski, et al. ©2010 IEEE. “NTC is an enabling technology that allows for continued scaling of CMOS-based devices, while significantly improving energy efficiency,” Dreslinski told PhysOrg.com. “The major impact of the work is that, for a fixed battery lifetime, significantly more transistors can be used, allowing for greater functionality. Particularly, [NTC allows] the full use of all transistors offered by technology scaling, eliminating ‘Dark Silicon’ that occurs as we scale to future technology nodes beyond 22 nm where ’more transistors can be placed on chip, but will be unable to be turned on concurrently.’”Operating at threshold voltageNear-threshold computing could be the key to decreasing power requirements without overturning the entire CMOS framework, the researchers say. Although low-voltage computing is already popular as an energy-efficient technique for ultralow-energy niche markets such as wristwatches and hearing aids, its large circuit delays lead to large energy leakages that have made it impractical for most computing segments. So far, these ultralow-energy devices have operated at extremely low “subthreshold” voltages, from around 200 millivolts down to the theoretical lower limit of 36 millivolts. Conventional voltage operation is about 1.0 volts. Meanwhile, near-threshold operation occurs around 400-500 millivolts, or near a device’s threshold voltage.Operating at near-threshold rather than subthreshold voltages could provide a compromise, enabling devices to require less energy while minimizing the energy leakage. This improved trade-off could potentially open up low-voltage design to mainstream semiconductor products. However, near-threshold computing still faces the other three challenges mentioned earlier: a 10 times performance loss, five times increase in performance variation, and an increase in functional failure rate of five orders of magnitude. These challenges have not been widely addressed so far, but the Michigan researchers spend the bulk of their analysis reviewing the current research to overcome these barriers.Part of the attraction of near-threshold computing is that it could have nearly universal applications in high-demand segments, such as data centers and personal computing. As the Web continues to grow, more data centers and servers are needed to host websites, and their power consumption is currently doubling about every five years. Personal computing devices, many of which are portable, could also benefit from increased battery lifetime due to reduced power needs. Dreslinski notes that previous studies have shown that the impact of NTC on devices will vary based on a particular consumer’s usage. “A user who only uses their device for making phone calls won’t see much impact because most of the power is consumed outside the CPU,” he said. “However, users who utilize music/video players and other compute-intensive tasks on their phone could see significant battery life improvements and reduced heat generated by the device. Quantifying these numbers is difficult based on the varying workloads of users coupled with parallel advances in battery technologies. My unofficial estimate would be a 1.5x to 2x improvement in battery lifetime, although some users could see significantly more or less.”Near-threshold computing could also be useful in sensor-based systems, which have applications in biomedical implants, among other areas. While these sensors may have a size of about 1 mm3, they often require batteries that are many orders of magnitude larger than the electronics themselves. By reducing the power requirements by up to 100 times in sensors, near-threshold computing could open the doors to many possible future designs. (PhysOrg.com) — While electronic devices have greatly improved in many regards, such as in storage capacity, graphics, and overall performance, etc., they still have a weight hanging around their neck: they’re huge energy hogs. When it comes to energy efficiency, today’s computers, cell phones, and other gadgets are little better off than those from a decade ago, or more. The problem of power goes beyond being green and saving money. For electrical engineers, power has become the primary design constraint for future electronic devices. Without lowering power consumption, improvements made in other areas of electronic devices could be useless, simply because there isn’t enough power to support them. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Explore further Nanotech SRAM for battery devices unveiled Citation: Near-threshold computing could enable up to 100x reduction in power consumption (2010, February 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-02-near-threshold-enable-100x-reduction-power.html More information: Ronald G. Dreslinski, Michael Wieckowski, David Blaauw, Dennis Sylvester, Trevor Mudge. “Near-Threshold Computing: Reclaiming Moore’s Law Through Energy Efficient Integrated Circuits.” Proceedings of the IEEE. Vol. 98, No. 2, February 2010. Doi:10.1109/JPROC2009.2034764last_img read more

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Tech firms on alert as US top court takes up class action

first_imgGoogle Inc, Facebook Inc, eBay Inc and Yahoo Inc filed court papers backing Spokeo, a people search website. Image Credit: WashingtonPost Advertisement The U.S. Supreme Court will consider on Monday whether to nip in the bud a class action lawsuit against online search service Spokeo Inc in a case closely watched by Silicon Valley companies that face similar claims.If the court rules for Pasadena, California-based Spokeo and finds that a consumer lawsuit cannot proceed when the plaintiff cannot show he is being harmed, it could curtail a recent wave of class action cases against online companies.Google Inc, Facebook Inc, eBay Inc and Yahoo Inc filed court papers backing Spokeo, a people search website. – Advertisement – If similar cases are allowed to proceed against other companies, any user of their services who alleges a legal violation based only on a technical violation of a federal statute could “pursue a multi-billion dollar statutory damages claim despite the lack of injury,” the brief said.The case gives the conservative-leaning Supreme Court another chance to limit class action litigation as it has in a series of rulings including a major 2011 victory for Wal Mart Stores Inc.“We think this case presents the opportunity … to close the door on non-injury class actions,” said Jason Matthes, Spokeo’s general counsel.Facebook, Google and Yahoo have all faced similar lawsuits over violations of different federal laws. As many online companies have millions of users, a case can quickly snowball into a multimillion dollar class action.Without class action status, a case involving an individual plaintiff presents a much smaller risk to a company.Kate Todd, an attorney with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s legal arm, called the Spokeo dispute an example of plaintiffs’ lawyers “pushing the boundaries” of the types of cases that can be pursued.[related-posts]In the Spokeo case, plaintiff Thomas Robins sued in California on behalf of himself and a potential class under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, which requires consumer reporting agencies to provide correct information. There is a maximum $1,000 penalty per violation.Robins, who was unemployed when he sued in 2010, had claimed his Spokeo entry had damaged his job-seeking prospects because it contained inaccurate information. The entry, for example, said Robins has a graduate degree, which he called incorrect.“In today’s age, consumers are increasingly concerned about their online reputation,” said Robins’ attorney, Jay Edelson, whose firm specializes in suing tech companies for privacy violations.The high court is currently considering two other class action cases. One involving claims against advertising firm Campbell-Ewald Co was argued last month.The other, concerning a lawsuit against food producer Tyson Foods Inc, will be argued on Nov. 10.[Reuters]last_img read more

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