Now That’s Sick

first_imgIt’s hard to judge how soon after being sick one can take back to the bike. I guess it depends on what kind of sick it is, and what part of the body had it the worst.I, for instance, was paralyzed in my bed on Sunday with an impromptu colon cleanse. I would like to add that Sunday is my day to ride all day if I want. The one day that I am free from the chains of sticky popsicle hands, dead worms, and mopping yet another pool of pee off of the kitchen floor from…whomever.Imagine my surprise at 4 a.m. when I awoke nauseous and cramped into fetal position. The first thought is, “No! If I hold very still it will go away!” That lasted about two fragile breaths before lurching to the bathroom door in a very unquiet fashion. It’s important in my bedroom to be very quiet when navigating across the floor of Legos, sleeping puppies and laundry piles. SOME PEOPLE become very angry when such a trip becomes eventful.Well it was eventful. I even had the audacity to flush.I had just gotten back to about ten days of good running and riding with sporty new Hi-Tec trail shoes and a regular Tuesday night babysitter for rides when the shit literally hit the fan.I spent hours depleting my body of every drip of fluid before collapsing into a crumpled heap. My body ached with desire to sweat, but there was nothing left. The fan carried the smell of frying bacon into my bed, heaving me back to the bathroom…again and again.I fumbled for my phone to text for the delivery – from two rooms away – of a recovery drink that I had imagined I would be sipping at this very same hour, yet next to a cool stream with mud-splattered legs.I texted again when I couldn’t stand long enough in the window light to read the Tylenol PM bottle instructions, only to learn that I was home alone as everyone was out hiking the Mountains to Sea trail. Children born to unmarried parents are called what? I guessed the dose, which resulted in my first two hours of blissful sleep, followed by a brave foray to the deck. All of this excitement resulted in a complete 12 hours of sleep.I awoke feeling absolutely fine – just in time for a full day’s work. I couldn’t decide whether I was relieved by the timing due to the recent work schedule, or barmy. 1 2last_img read more

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GoPro’s CEO Dropped by $229 Million to Fulfill a Promise to…

first_imgGoPro founder and CEO Nick Woodman has honored a promise he made to his college roommate a decade ago and it cost him $229 million. Woodman had promised to give his college roommate Neil Dana 10 percent of all the money he makes when taking his company public. In 2011, GoPro issued Dana 6.3 million stock options. Woodman agreed to reimburse the company whenever the options were exercised.Neil Dana, who attended the University of California at San Diego with Woodman, was GoPro’s first employee. He currently serves as the company’s director of music and specialty sales.Woodman, whose net worth will fall to $2.3 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, was awarded $285.3 million in 2014 compensation, making him the highest-paid U.S. executive.GoPro CEO Nick Woodman.last_img read more

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Connecticut’s Geno Auriemma says majority of coaches are ‘afraid of their players’

first_imgConnecticut women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma is used to playing in March. The long-time Huskies coach will make his 20th appearance at the Women’s Final Four on Friday.But, there’s something Auriemma is still getting used to and that’s the changing climate within the NCAA. When speaking to reporters Tuesday, Auriemma said there are many coaches that are now “afraid” of upsetting players, who could transfer and/or report the coach for verbal abuse.”The majority of coaches in America are afraid of their players,” Auriemma said. “The NCAA, the athletic directors and society has made them afraid of their players. Every article you read: ‘This guy’s a bully. This woman’s a bully. This guy went over the line. This woman was inappropriate.’​ Related News “Yet the players get off scot-free in everything. They can do whatever they want. They don’t like something you say to them, they transfer. Coaches, they have to coach with one hand behind their back. Why? Because some people have abused the role of a coach.”​The other Final Four coaches — Notre Dame’s Muffet McGraw, Baylor’s Kim Mulkey and Oregon’s Kelly Graves — also agreed that coaches now need to be aware of their tone toward players.But Auriemma, perhaps the most outspoken on the matter, said the “line” can be hard to determine and used Michigan State men’s coach Tom Izzo as an example.Izzo had a heated interaction with a player in Round 1 of the NCAA Men’s Tournament. He was seen screaming at Aaron Henry when players were walking to the sidelines during a timeout and moments later, Izzo got in Henry’s face again as players stepped in to separate the two.​”People gave Tom Izzo a lot of grief for something he did on the sideline,” Auriemma said. “His players loved that. He doesn’t have to care what you think of it. He just has to care what his players think of it. If his players all transferred, if his players all quit on him, then he went over the line. If his players play really hard for him, they keep winning, they love him, they keep coming back to the program, then that’s passion.”Auriemma added: “Everybody’s got to coach to their personality. It’s harder today than it’s ever been to motivate players. I mean, I get we have to keep an eye on things. We don’t want people to abuse the system. I get that. I’m all in favor of that. UNC puts entire women’s basketball coaching staff on leave during investigation “I just find it a little bit disconcerting that more and more coaches are being told, ‘This is inappropriate; you’re not acting the right way.’ What is the right way, and who is going to decide what the right way is? I don’t know what the answer to that is.”The No. 2 Huskies will face the defending champion top-seeded Fighting Irish at 9 p.m. ET on Friday. No. 2 Oregon and No. 1 Baylor will play before at 7 p.m. ET.last_img read more

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