Did a Global Flood Move Rocks Across Continents?  No, uh…

first_imgPaper View Sept 14, 2010 — Geologists were baffled.  Something moved rocks up to 3,000 miles across whole continents.  They found evidence in Asia and also in America.  How on earth could that happen?  Their list of explanations omitted one possibility: the transporting power of water.  Maybe it’s because it would have implied a global flood like the world had never seen.    An international team publishing in the GSA Bulletin wrote about “Extraordinary transport and mixing of sediment across Himalayan central Gondwana during the Cambrian�Ordovician.”1  They found similar detrital zircon samples across a wide swath of the Himalayan foothills, covering “great distances” of at least 3000 km and perhaps as much as 5000 km.  They used assumptions to rule out time as a factor, suggesting that this “extraordinary” transport of material occurred at one time.  What does it imply?  “In any case, by examining samples within a small window of well-constrained depositional ages from across the length of the Himalayan range, our data not only indicate extraordinary transport distances, but a high degree of sediment mixing and homogenization.”  They emphasized it again: “In this regard, both transport distances and sediment mixing within early Gondwana are extraordinary for the geologic record.”  It likely applies to “much, if not the whole of Gondwana” (the hypothetical supercontinent that broke up into today’s continents).    The Himalayas are not the only location.  They referred to evidence published earlier that assigns the origin of many of the Grand Canyon sediments to the Appalachian mountains thousands of kilometers to the east (09/15/2003).  Again, extraordinary long-distance transport mechanisms must have been in operation.  What could possibly do it?  Their short list of possible mechanisms omits one that creation geologists would probably be saying is intuitively obvious: a global flood.The causes of such a pattern might be unique to time and place, and may include a combination of (1) lack of continental vegetation, (2) clustering of continents near the equator, (3) increased continental weathering rates, (4) widespread uplift and erosion associated with regionally extensive and relatively synchronous orogenesis [mountain-building] recording supercontinental amalgamation, and (5) production of significant relief, providing stream power for large-scale river systems.A closer look reveals that none of those mechanisms contradicts a global flood; in fact, they would each appear to be consequences of one.  What else would produce any one or a combination of those causes?1.  Myrow, Hughes et al, “Extraordinary transport and mixing of sediment across Himalayan central Gondwana during the Cambrian�Ordovician,” Geological Society of America Bulletin Sept. 2010, v. 122 no. 9-10 p. 1660-1670, doi: 10.1130/B30123.1.Composite explanations are generally avoided in science because of Ockham’s Razor: “plurality should not be posited without necessity.”  If a scientist explains the yard being wet by saying, “It might have rained, or the sprinklers might have come on, or a water-spraying truck drove by,” the power of the explanation is decreased.  Here, the scientists admitted that something extraordinary – something possibly unique in the geologic record – occurred to move sediments so far at one time.  (Notice, incidentally, this amounts to a rejection of uniformitarianism.)  Nothing like that is seen happening today.  Special pleading is also to be avoided when explaining things scientifically, but isn’t that what they just did?  They did not explain with reference to natural law and observable, repeatable processes.  They said, essentially, that an extraordinary one-time effect might have been caused by five things or any combination of them.  On the surface of it, the explanation sounds weak.    A scientific explanation is strengthened when a single cause explains multiple effects.  Suppose your yard is wet, some objects are knocked over and a swath of wetness covers several homes in a line.  Which explanation is better?  (A) House #1 turned the sprinklers on, house #2 had a watering truck drive by, house #3 got rained on and house #4 had an above-ground pool that leaked, and the houses just happened to be in a line.  (B) There was a brush fire nearby and a water-dropping plane doused the area.    A global flood would produce all 5 effects that the geologists listed as causes: (1) a lack of continental vegetation, because it had been stripped away at the onset of the flood; (2) clustering of continents near the equator, because creationists generally agree the continents split apart as the fountains of the great deep opened; (3) weathering rates increased dramatically (well, duh); (4) widespread uplift and erosion associated with regionally extensive and synchronous mountain building occurred (because the mountain ranges formed as a consequence of the dividing continents, and erosion was intense); and (5) production of significant relief, providing stream power for large-scale river systems, because the new mountains caused dramatic runoff as the waters receded, transporting soft sediments over vast distances.  One more for good measure: a global flood would explain the “high degree of sediment mixing and homogenization” of sediments they observed.    Notice that the secular geology explanation cannot account for increased weathering rates, widespread erosion, homogenization, synchronous mountain building and large-scale river systems (cf. 04/30/2009, “Are Secular Geologists Ready to Consider a Global Flood?”).  In the current example, the composite, special-pleading scenario in the paper leaves much to be desired as a scientific explanation.  Biblical creationists can point to a single cause that explains all the effects.  They have eyewitness testimony, too: Yes, uh… Noah.(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Brand South Africa breaks ground in Free State

first_imgFree State delegates sign the Brand SouthAfrica pledge to uphold the nation brandand position the country as a topinvestment and tourism destination. Free State MEC for Economic Development,Tourism and Environmental Affairs,Mxolisi Dukwana.(Images: Nicky Rehbock) MEDIA CONTACTS • Brand South Africa+27 11 483 0122RELATED ARTICLES• KZN innovators show how it’s done • South Africa is Africa’s top nation brand • Building a thriving nation brand• EC entrepreneurs in the spotlight Nicky RehbockBrand South Africa headed to the Free State on 17 November 2011 to urge all residents of the province to build the nation’s reputation and position it for global competitiveness.This was the message relayed at the fifth Brand South Africa Stakeholder Summit in Bloemfontein, attended by representatives from government, business and civil society.Taking place in each of the nine provinces, the summits aim to increase provincial participation in the nation-branding effort and encourage active citizenship – which, in turn, will help position the country as a top investment and tourism destination.Speaking at the summit, Brand South Africa programme manager for civil society Leo Makgamathe said that the branding of the country is not a matter of choice, but a necessity.To be successful it requires the combined effort of government, citizens, business, political parties, charities, the media, academia and sporting organisations.“With globalisation speeding up the production and movement of goods, services, investment and talent, perceptions of nations have to be actively managed,” Makgamathe added.And this is no different in South Africa.The country has recently achieved four key milestones: it managed a highly successful Fifa World Cup; came through the world-wide recession almost unscathed; joined Brazil, Russia, China and India in the BRICS economic bloc; and held its fourth free and fair local elections since 1994.“This has underlined that South Africa is an important developing nation in its own right – which has to be marketed to the world,” Makgamathe said.Strong nation brand vital for Free State “The economy of the Free State is built on agriculture and its mines, but increasingly we are looking to tourism as a growth sector and hope to expand our manufacturing base,” the province’s MEC for Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs Mxolisi Dukwana said at the summit.The Free State is also looking to diversify by developing its logistics capacity, ICT sector, innovation and research, agri-processing and pharmaceuticals.“So what we, and South Africa, need is more investment. How people see a country is vital in this regard. The image of a country makes an integral contribution in attracting tourists, investors and in building trade relationships,” Dukwana added.The government’s role in this is ensuring the country has enabling policies to attract trade and investment, but South Africans also have to believe in themselves to position the country as a viable destination.“We must be bold enough to face our fears and challenges, and understand what we’re about. In doing that we can become our own marketers. In our diversity we also need to have one identity and be proud of it. Often we’re too negative and hard on ourselves,” the MEC told summit delegates.“I urge all of you to do your ‘national service’ and respond when Brand South Africa calls, so that we can work together to create a truly great South Africa for all.”last_img read more

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Are happier citizens making Singapore a smart city leader?

first_imgSurveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities Related Posts While many governments are recent converts to the smart city ideology, Singapore has been a movement leader for decades. And the Asian city-state is about to ramp up its efforts with its soon-to-be-unveiled Smart Nations strategy.The GovTech site features a lengthy discussion with Singapore’s CIO Chan Cheow Hoe which serves as a master-class in smart city planning.Over the years Chan says one of Singapore’s biggest revelations is that effective smart city programs must be first and foremost customer-centric.“The whole idea is to first establish a relationship…and a point of trust between government and the people,” he says.“The second thing — that I think is very important — is the concept of what we call ‘frictionless’ government,” Chan says. “What we are trying to do is to take out all this unnecessary friction as much as possible, and this goes back to the customer experience.”Singapore’s lengthy smart city history includes such projects as traffic congestion analytics, waste monitoring and sustainable buildings.Driving the city-state’s early smart city adoption was its need to maximize the use of its compact 427 square miles of geography to best serve its bustling population of 5.6 million.One of the biggest smart city challenges faced by Singapore, and indeed all global governments, is modernizing outdated legacy IT systems. Legacy systems often hinder shifting infrastructure to the cloud and frequently dampen innovative thinking.See also: NuTonomy cabs ready for hailing in SingaporeHowever, Singapore tackled this familiar bugbear by focusing its efforts on improving customer service while minimizing service disruptions to its core systems.“We started splitting up what we call our system of records with the system of engagement,” says Chan.  “We made the legacy system just a simple system of records. We shut off the front end and we essentially built a funnel on top of it.”He says this allowed Singapore to be agile in building front end customer services while leaving the legacy systems relatively intact.“It decreases the need for the legacy systems significantly, and over a period of time allows resources to be dedicated to the customer experience,” he says.These improvements allowed Singapore to build up a trust-based relationship with its citizens through its digitalID strategy. This strategy focused on breaking various pools of data out of their silos to remove much of the friction in government-citizen interactions, manifesting in such projects as MyInfo.Singapore has data issues sorted outMyInfo pulls data on citizens from various departments into a useable pool of verified information.“Instead of you bringing your ID card and everything to show these things, you don’t have to do these unnecessary transactions anymore because the data is pulled directly,” he says. “This data doesn’t belong to the government — the data still belongs to you as an individual — but you have the right to consent to give that data to somebody else.”Singapore is presently embarking on its ambitions Smart Nation initiative which will include the deployment one of the most sprawling sensor and camera networks a city has ever seen.And with such a vast array of sensors, the obvious issue of how to secure such expansive Internet of Things (IoT) technology.Chan says securing IoT is a running battle that no one can solve with a silver bullet.“The question for us now is really about categorizing systems. There are highly secure systems we will spend a lot of money protecting,” says Chan. “For the rest, it is what it is.”“If something happens to it we are just going to accept the risk and move on, as long as the risk is not so big that it actually cripples certain critical services in the country.” Donal Power Tags:#cybersecurity#infrastructure#Internet of Things#IoT#Singapore#Smart Cities center_img How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In…last_img read more

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Haryana varsity suspends 13 students

first_imgThirteen students of the Central University of Haryana (CUH) in Mahendergarh were suspended on Thursday for allegedly creating “hindrance in the smooth functioning of academic and administrative functioning of the university”. The suspended students, including 11 BTech students, and others have been on strike since the past 10 days against lack of infrastructure and staff in the School of Engineering and Technology.Misbehaviour alleged The suspension came a few hours after the agitating students — who were protesting against alleged misbehaviour by security guards with female students on Wednesday night — prevented Vice-Chancellor R.C. Kuhad from leaving the premises in his car. They claimed the security guards used force on Wednesday to disperse students, including women, who were holding a peaceful protest outside the university’s Academic Block. They added that the guards also tore posters, prompting hundreds of students to hold a protest all night. The agitating students alleged that varsity officials misbehaved with them on Thursday and locked the building from inside to prevent them from entering the premises to drink water and relieve themselves.‘Baseless claims’Dismissed as “baseless” the allegations of misbehaviour by the guards, CUH spokesperson Shailender Kumar accused the students of manhandling the V-C. He claimed CUH had agreed to meet their demands in a time-bound manner and a notice in this regard was already circulated on April 15. Lack of facilitiesThe students are on strike since April 9, alleging that two years after the School of Engineering and Technology was established in 2016, it still lacks minimum facilities like laboratories, building and regular staff. The School offers BTech in four disciplines. However, a student of BTech (electrical engineering) said promises made by the administration were hollow. “We want a letter signed by the V-C himself with a promise to meet all our demands in a time-bound manner. We believed the verbal assurances of the V-C last August but nothing happened. How can we believe the administration that laboratories will be ready in three months when construction of building is yet to start?” said the student. CUH Finance Officer Sanjeev Kumar said the university’s notice to meet the demands of students in a time-bound manner had the approval of the V-C and was signed by the Registrar. “It seems that some people are instigating the students. The students seemed satisfied after a marathon meeting with the V-C on Wednesday but were instigated into continuing the protest. They are coming up with new demands every other day,” said Mr. Kumar.He added that approval of the All-India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) was not required for BTech courses as the university was autonomous body and received grants from the University Grants Commission.last_img read more

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6 Assam communities enforce 2-day shutdown

first_imgA forum of six communities demanding Scheduled Tribe status enforced a 48-hour shutdown affecting normal life in parts of Assam since Monday.The police reported sporadic incidents of violence and disruption of communication in eastern, central and western Assam where the six communities — Moran, Muttock, Tai-Ahom, Kock-Rajbongshi, Chutia and Adivasi (‘tea tribe’) — are in the majority.These communities currently enjoy Other Backwards Class status. The OBCs’ share in Assam’s quota pie is 27%, while the STs (plains), Scheduled Castes and STs (hills) have 10%, 7% and 5% share respectively.Two-decade-old issueThe ST status demand by the six communities has been a major issue for more than two decades now. The Bharatiya Janata Party had promised them tribal status before the 2014 Lok Sabha elections.The last meeting between the Centre and the representatives of the six communities was held in April 2017. Leaders of these communities said they are still awaiting a report that was to be submitted by June 2017.The trigger for the two-day shutdown from 5 a.m. on Monday was the alleged snub by Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh during a meeting with leaders of the six communities in New Delhi on July 20. “The Minister came and went without saying much except that our issue would be resolved soon,” said Aswini Chetia, adviser of All-Assam Tai-Ahom Students’ Union, adding that neither Mr. Singh, nor Minister of State for Home Affairs Kiren Rijiju “seemed interested in knowing about our demands”. The six communities would organise a rally on July 30 demanding the intervention of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to fulfil the BJP’s commitment to grant them ST status. Other tribes waryThe existing ST communities in Assam are opposed to the move to grant tribal status to the six ethnic groups. The Coordination Committee of the Tribal Organisations of Assam (CCTOA), representing Bodo, Rabha, Tiwa, Karbi, Dimasa, Mising, Sonowal, Hajong, Garo and Deuri tribes, had in 2011 written to the Singla Committee that the proposal to grant ST status to six “advances and populous OBC communities” was “a conspiracy to destroy/exterminate the existing STs of Assam”.The Centre had set up the committee headed by Mahesh Kumar Singla, then Special Secretary (internal security) in the Home Ministry, on March 1, 2011, to look into the demand of the six communities and its fallout.The CCTOA had said that the Registrar General of India had rejected the demand of the six communities eight times between 1981 and 2006. The Centre did grant ST status to the Koch-Rajbongshis for six months in 1996, but it was revoked after it was found that 33 of 42 medical seats and 17 of 21 engineering seats apart from other courses reserved for STs had been taken away by the Koch-Rajbongshis.Tribal-majority State?Social scientists say granting ST status to the six communities would make Assam a tribal majority State and would entitle it to special safeguards that might help in solving complications arising out of alleged illegal influx into the State affecting its demographic balance.If granted reservation, the number of Assembly seats reserved for tribal people is expected to jump from the existing 16 to about 85-90 in the 126-seat House by way of fresh delimitation of constituencies.last_img read more

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9 days ago​Liverpool hero Hamann: I wanted to join Arsenal

first_img​Liverpool hero Hamann: I wanted to join Arsenalby Ansser Sadiq9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool legend Dietmar Hamann has admitted that he wanted to join Arsenal instead of the Reds!The German defensive midfielder played over 200 games for the club in the early 2000s.But when he left Newcastle in 1999, Hamann has revealed that his first choice was to go to Arsenal under Arsene Wenger.It is understandable, given the Gunners were competing for Premier League titles in those years.However, Hamann told The Athletic that he never got any serious interest from Arsenal, which meant that Liverpool was his best option for a step up from Newcastle.He signed for the club in an £8 million deal under Gerard Houiller and became a mainstay in the team for the next seven years. About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Mississippi State Releases Awesome “Relentless” Hype Video

first_imgA Mississippi State player scores a touchdown over an LSU defender.Mississippi State Hype VideoMississippi State suffered a tough loss to Georgia Tech in last year’s Orange Bowl, but all in all, the Bulldogs had a great season. MSU opened the 2014 campaign with nine straight victories, including wins over LSU, Auburn and Arkansas, before falling in a close contest to Alabama. The Bulldogs, in early November, were the No. 1 ranked team in the country. And they posted double-digit victories for just the second time in their program’s history.The 2015 Bulldogs aren’t being picked by many to be quite as successful, but with star quarterback Dak Prescott returning, they may surprise a few people. Thursday, the school released an awesome hype video titled “Relentless” to tease the 2015 campaign. Enjoy, MSU fans:last_img

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Accident or murder A look at some court cases involving fatal shootings

first_imgA Saskatchewan jury has found farmer Gerald Stanley not guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of 22-year-old Colten Boushie. Court heard that Boushie and his friends drove onto Stanley’s property seeking help for a flat tire, but had also tried breaking into a truck on a neighbouring farm. Stanley testified he fired some warning shots in the air before approaching the SUV. He said he reached in to grab the car keys in the ignition and the gun he was holding accidentally went off. Boushie was shot in the back of the head.Here are a few court cases involving people charged with murder who said the shootings were accidental:April 21, 1996: Nick Biuk, 26, was shot and killed at a backyard barbecue in Kitchener, Ont. Michael Meiler, angry that his estranged wife had a new boyfriend, had gone to the home with a gun. One man jumped on Meiler from behind in an attempt to get the gun. Meiler flew into Biuk and a struggled ensued. Biuk died from a single shot to the abdomen. Meiler testified that he did not intend to shoot Biuk and that the gun fired accidentally. A jury convicted him of Biuk’s second-degree murder and the attempted murder of his wife’s boyfriend. He was sentenced to life with no chance at parole for 12 years.___May 6, 2000: Chester Charlie, 20, was shot and killed at a house party in Fraser Lake, B.C. Jody James Gunning admitted to the shooting but said he never intended to kill Charlie. Gunning said he found Charlie, an uninvited guest, sitting on his bed and going through a drawer in his night stand. He said Charlie refused to leave and the shotgun he took out to intimidate him accidentally went off. Charlie died from a single shot to the neck. A jury found Gunning guilty of second-degree murder, but the Supreme Court ordered a new trial. Before his second trial was to begin, Gunning pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to eight years.___April 5, 2005: Jessica James, 34, was fatally shot in the head in a home on Penelakut Island, B.C. Her husband, Robert Taylor, testified that the shooting was accidental. He said they had been drinking and arguing about money. She told him he was wasting money on his drinking and questioned why he could buy food for their dog but not his family. He loaded a high-powered rifle intending to point it at the dog. He testified that his wife grabbed the rifle and it went off. A jury convicted him of second-degree murder, but a new trial was ordered on appeal. A judge reached the same guilty verdict in 2009.___May 28, 2008: Janice McMath, 64, was fatally shot on a farm near Abbotsford, B.C. Her estranged husband, Robert McMath, told police he was responsible but that the shooting was an accident. Court heard the couple were separated and about to go to trial over their assets. However, they were cordial and Janice often visited Robert at the farm. They had been drinking wine outside near a barn when McMath said he picked up a rifle he used for coyotes. He said he was unloading the gun when he stumbled and it went off. Janice was shot twice and died days later in hospital. A judge acquitted McMath of second-degree murder and found him guilty of manslaughter. He received the minimum sentence for manslaughter when a firearm is involved — four years.last_img read more

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United States mens soccer team silences Jamaica in Crew Stadium 10

Members of the United State’s men’s national soccer team like to think of Crew Stadium as home. The American’s most recent visit to Columbus is yet another example of why there’s no place like home. The U.S. improved its all-time record at Crew Stadium to 6-0-3 with a 1-0 win against Jamaica in a 2014 World Cup qualifying match Tuesday. American forward Herculez Gomez struck a set-piece goal in the 55th minute to give the Americans a lead it wouldn’t relinquish. U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard also helped keep a shutout intact for the Americans, who avenged their 2-1 loss to Jamaica on Friday in Kingston, Jamaica. With the win, the U.S. moves into a three-way tie for first-place in its World Cup qualifying group with Jamaica and Guatemala. The Guatemalans defeated Antigua and Barbuda Tuesday, 1-0, to keep pace in the group, from which only the top two teams can advance in World Cup qualifying. The Americans will resume World Cup qualifying Oct. 12 with a game against the group’s last-place team, Antigua and Barbuda, in St. John’s, Antigua. Crew Stadium was a powder keg and the U.S. came close to lighting the fuse numerous times in the first half. Chance after chance went just wide of Jamaican keeper Dwayne Miller’s goal. American midfielder Graham Zusi set the tone for the first half when he clanked an 18-yard shot off the upper right corner of Miller’s goal, which was besieged in the first half. All told, three U.S. shots caromed off the posts of Miller’s net by the time 30 minutes had passed. Other U.S. attempts whistled wide as the American fans standing on temporary bleachers waited to erupt. Howard, by comparison, wasn’t tested once in the opening half, and his teammates kept the pressure up on the other end of the field, outshooting Jamaica, 8-0, in the opening 45 minutes. Jamaica was barely hanging on, but the Americans weren’t able to break through and the teams went to half in a scoreless tie. Fans remained at a roar as the second half began and before long, the moment the entire stadium had been waiting for finally arrived in the 55th minute. After the U.S. earned a free kick from about 25 yards out, Gomez stepped to the ball and bent his kick around a wall of Jamaican defenders. Miller made a full-stretch lunge to save the shot, but could only manage to get part of his left hand on Gomez’s rip from distance. The white twine of the net rippled and Gomez had put the U.S. up, 1-0, to spark Crew Stadium to life. From there on out, it was all defense for the U.S. and few additional offensive chances.  Howard and his backline of defenders managed to deal with Jamaica’s three second-half shot. In the midfield, Jermaine Jones, a dual citizen of America and Germany, pushed and muscled his way around the field to stop the Jamaican attacks. Jamaica never had a shot on goal. In the 82nd minute, Howard skied to tip a seemingly threatening corner kick away from the mouth of his goal, and most of the 23,881 still in attendance roared with approval. Jamaica, nicknamed the “Reggae Boyz,” wouldn’t mount another serious attack.  After three minutes of extra time, Honduran referee Jose Pineda blew his whistle to end the game and send the packed stadium into one final frenzied cheer. read more

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