NP Launches New Branch in Kakata

first_imgNational Petroleum (NP), a Sierra Leonean owned petroleum products dealer, has opened a filling station in Kakata, Margibi County. The opening ceremony took place on Saturday, April 9 where the Managing Director, Mohammed S. Kanu, assured the people of Kakata that his company is there to stay. “NP is here to stay and it is a privilege for Margibi County to have us here,” said Mr. Kanu. The Sierra Leonean businessman reminded the people of Kakata that NP is a very small company from Sierra Leone.“But what we have done here is how to challenge a giant as long as God is with us,” Kanu added.He said that if David can challenge Goliath and defeat him, smaller companies can also challenge bigger ones and survive. He explained that NP met petroleum giants on the ground when it came to Liberia.“We have lived by example and showed Liberian companies how to compete against bigger firms. What they need to do is not be everywhere, but they must occupy well before moving to another place and this is exactly what NP is doing here in Liberia,” he said.“We have included cooking gas in our line of products on sale at various NP gas stations in Liberia at cheaper prices,” Kanu declared.He urged Liberians to make use of the cooking gas that is sold at NP at very reasonable price.“Cooking gas should be accessible to everybody in Liberia,” he said, “because it is easily accessible by the people in other West African countries, including Ghana and Ivory Coast, amongst others.”He thanked the county authority and people of Kakata for giving NP an opportunity to provide services to their county.Cutting the ribbon to the filling station, Deputy Managing Director for Operations at the Liberian Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC), Edwin Sarvice, thanked NP for choosing Kakata to invest.He also assured NP that under the current administration of LPRC, they would create the level playing field for everybody can compete equally. Mr. Sarvice then encouraged others to emulate the good example of NP.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Mom killer’s sentencing deferred

first_imgThe sentencing of a man who was implicated in killing his own mother seven years ago has been deferred to accommodate a court request for a medical evaluation of the defendant.Accused mom killer: Adrian McKenzieAdrian Mc Kenzie’s sentencing was scheduled to be handed down by Justice James Bovell-Drakes at the High Court in Georgetown on Monday, but the judge requested a medical evaluation to determine whether he is fit to be sentenced. The evaluation will have to be conducted by a Government psychiatrist.Using a hammer, McKenzie beat 62-year-old Ethel Andrews to death on November 16, 2010 at their Sand Creek, Rupununi home. According to reports, the woman had reprimanded her son after he allegedly had assaulted his father and was in the process of carrying out a similar attack on his grandfather.Reportedly after the woman had intervened to prevent him from so doing, Mc Kenzie became angered and hammered his mother in the head. She reportedly died shortly afterwards.Justice Bovell-Drakes has adjourned proceedings to December 5, when a determination would be made on the fitness of the accused to be sentenced, weeks after he pleaded guilty to the lesser count of manslaughter.He was represented by Defence Counsel Maxwell McKay, while Prosecutors Mandell Moore and Orinthia Schmidt had led the State’s case.last_img read more

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Minister expresses condolences to family after ambulance debacle

first_imgMinister Regina Doherty has expressed condolences in the Dáil to the family of a Letterkenny who died after it took an ambulance 71 minutes to reach her home just 2km away.An inquest at Letterkenny Coroner’s Court yesterday heard that mother-of-eight Margaret Callaghan died in the early hours of January 9, 2018 after waiting for an ambulance at Mountain Top.The coroner hearing the inquest called on the HSE to review their protocols for ambulance turnaround times at hospitals across the country following the tragedy. In the Dáil, Ms Doherty admitted that an increase in the number of patients attending emergency departments has in turn put extra strain on ambulance services.However, Fianna Fáil deputy leader, Dara Calleary, said that blaming increases in patient numbers shows a “complete disconnect between the Government and what’s happening in hospitals”.He said: “The difficulties in our emergency departments are nothing to do with people getting sick and presenting to emergency departments — they are to do with the fact that there were 300 or fewer staff nurses employed in our system in October compared to last December. There’s 350 consultant vacancies.”Mr Calleary said 20 extra beds were promised for Letterkenny University Hospital but only 10 have opened. “That is where the difficulties are — our emergency departments are under-resourced, are understaffed, nursing resources and consulting resources that are absolutely necessary are not in place.”Ms Doherty expressed her condolences to the family and told the Dáil that she hopes no other family has to go through a similar tragedy:“I can’t genuinely begin to probably understand or appreciate how difficult it will be for them to get over her death given that it potentially shouldn’t have happened.”She added: “It’s the case that when the emergency care hospital system is under pressure, there’s going to the potential for delays in the transfer patients from an ambulance into our emergency departments.”She said ambulance turnaround times are currently below target. ‘We cannot say exactly where it is going to end up’ – Chairman on children’s hospital costsBetween January and October this year, 85.5% of ambulances achieved a turnaround time 60 minutes or less, which is below the target of 95%.Ms Doherty told the Dáil that in the first 10 months of 2019, the numbers of patients attending hospital emergency departments increased by 2.7% across the country and the number of emergency department admissions increased by 1% compared to the same period last year.“But I do understand that the trolley numbers at 8am in Letterkenny University Hospital have been persistently high for this entire year,” said Ms Doherty. Minister expresses condolences to family after ambulance debacle was last modified: December 6th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ambulancedaildonegalhospitalMargaret CallaghanMinisteroffload delayslast_img read more

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Smart cities get connectivity guidance from Connected City Blueprint

first_imgTags:#IoT#Singapore#Smart Cities#smart city#Wireless Broadband Alliance Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic …center_img Donal Power A new strategic document backed by the Wireless Broadband Alliance (WBA) aims to help smart cities structure their connectivity plans.As reported by Smart Cities World, the first “Connected City Blueprint” was launched by the Connected City Advisory Board (CCAB). The board is an advisory committee under the aegis of the Singapore-based WBA.The WBA board consists of such wireless industry heavy-hitters as: AT&T, BT, China Telecom, Cisco Systems, Comcast, Intel, KT Corporation, Liberty Global, NTT DOCOMO and Orange.The CCAB’s blueprint is intended to lend guidance to smart cities by bringing together various ideas on how to structure connectivity plans from cities and local authorities.The blueprint also seeks to help clarify the emerging challenges and opportunities from smart and connected cities. It also highlights burgeoning opportunities with public-private partnerships, roaming and big data in relation to smart cities.The blueprint examines connectivity options in relation to various smart city stakeholders, including citizens, operators, regulators, entrepreneurs, wireless service developers and equipment manufacturers.“Cities have a responsibility to ensure that connectivity is accessible to all – citizens, businesses and city services,” said CCAB vice chair Reza Jafari. “This means it is imperative for city managers and CIOs who’ve successfully implemented connectivity to share plans and highlight the benefits of connected cities in a way for all to understand.”One-stop shopping for best practices?Jafari says the blueprint provides crucial guidance by serving as a medium for many smart city players to share experiences and ideas.“By allowing cities to share their experiences and help one another maximize opportunities and overcome challenges, we are one step closer to making the smart dream a reality,” he said.The WBA sees the blueprint as helping foster connectivity-related opportunities and allow governments to provide better services to residents in such public sectors as healthcare.It also says the sharing of connectivity strategies can reduce the technological inequality that has created a miasmic dyspepsia between rich and poor citizens of cities around the world.“The WBA is committed to bridging the digital divide, and the advent of connected cities will bring digital equality to citizens across the globe,” said WBA’s chief executive Shrikant Shenwai.“The CCAB’s Blueprint will enable cities to grow partnerships, and share essential knowledge that will essentially help better the lives of millions.”And considering that a recent report predicted that the global smart cities market could be worth $3.5 trillion by 2026, the wireless industry is looking to ensure that it remains front and center as connected urban environments continue their rapid emergence. Related Posts last_img read more

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Respond to plea seeking lower mining cap, SC tells Goa

first_imgThe Supreme Court on Thursday asked the Goa government and mining companies to respond on a petition seeking to lower the cap on extraction of mineral ores in the State from the current 20 MTPA to a final 12 MTPA.The apex court asked the State and the companies to file their responses to a petition filed by NGO Goa Foundation, represented by advocates Prashant Bhushan and Pranav Sachdeva, for reducing the interim cap of 20 MTPA.The petition also said the State and its citizens even runs the danger of increased pollution as the The Expert Committee on the CAP (ECOC) has recommended in its final report for an enhanced extraction of mineral ores from 20 million tonnes to 30 million tonnes.“Interim cap on extraction of mineral ores from Goa, recommended by the ECOC, was fixed in a vacuum, when mining had been suspended for several years. It was not fixed after confronting actual mining operations, when started, and their impact on people and environment,” the petition said.The petition said the present cap is subject to review as it is clear that “even 20 MT mineral extraction is deleterious to public health and environment”. The petition said the State does not have the infrastructure to handle such levels of extraction.It said the court should consider reducing the cap on mining in Goa to 5 MTPA.“At that level, mining could be conducted without damage to the environment, since it would be easier to monitor the activity and stop it immediately, if violations were observed,” the petition said.It said that though the mining industry was found to have damaged the environment of Goa in substantial, irreversible manner, as recorded in the reports of the Justice M.B. Shah Commission and the Central Empowered Committee, no rehabilitation of the damaged environment has even commenced despite mining having resumed, albeit on smaller scale, for the past two years.“In the current situation there is demonstrated proof that the mining industry is completely incapable and uninterested in balancing its interests with those of the environment and the villagers affected by their activities,” the petition said.A hearing has been scheduled in the matter for November 29.last_img read more

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CWG fiasco is a metaphor of our daily experience

first_imgYears ago when Muhammad Ali proclaimed that he was the greatest, he was the greatest. As heavy weight boxing champion of the world he had defeated every possible challenger and his claim was merely a statement of that fact. Muhammad Ali has never been known for modesty, but sports figures like Federer and Woods, though arguably the greatest of all time in their chosen sport, rarely bring up the subject on their own. Their greatness is claimed by others around them. Indian public life by contrast is a daily barrage of hyperbole, arrogance, false claims and often outright lies. With virtually nothing to back them, the Indian Commonwealth Organising Committee makes public and international statements so outlandish and arrogant, to be laughable. The Commonwealth Games will be the best ever. The stadia are better than Beijing. The facilities are 5-star…As if to remind the claimant of his conceit, a ceiling buckled at a stadium. Just when the Chief Minister was calling a waterlogged city of broken roads, world class, as if on cue, a bridge collapsed.InflationWhen the daily sights and sounds are of failure, hyperbole and superlatives become essential even for the most mediocre of accomplishments. Hailed as the pride of India, Delhi’s international airport has been designed and built by a consortium of foreign companies. Yet the insistence by the Prime Minister that the structure was a symbol of Indian ingenuity was a desperate call to all those within hearing distance that India had arrived. Even if we were not better than others, we were at least almost like them. In every utterance there is an urgent need to repair the shaky confidence of a nation riddled with daily signs of ineptness and greed.advertisementSo desperate is the urge to falsify reality, that its replacement is not a modest parting of relevant information, but hopeless exaggeration. Public remarks are coated in either misinformation or vagueness. Or are just clever rebuttals. The Naxals are not anti-national, but are a problem to the nation-state. We can’t distribute the rotting wheat; it has to be done through the Public Distribution System. The judiciary is not above the law, the judiciary is the law.Part of the problem lies with a society that despite its claim to modernity, still refuses to think outside of the family. Nothing of national, regional or local interest can be of any value to people whose allegiance is firmly stuck in the private progress of the household. Indian business models seem quaint but outmoded to foreigners when the management of sizeable industrial resources are shared amongst relatives: brothers and sons as MDs, wives and daughters as sleeping partners. Ministers’ sons are natural contenders for succession, even if more qualified candidates are available. Every year the railways most successful expansion program is linked to setting up stations at the minister’s ancestral village, however remote. With easy availability of national resources, progress of the Indian family is always possible?Moreover, the incapacity to do, is intrinsically linked to the capacity to pass responsibility. Even a cursory glance will reveal that India has an extensive institutional and public framework for governance that consistently fails to deliver. In forestry alone there are several national institutes and departments doing research, experimentation, afforestation, surveys, management, species development, preservation, conservation, land control etc.. Yet India ranks amongst countries with one of the highest levels of depleting forest cover in the world. There may be a surplus of wheat in India, but without its distribution, India also has the highest deaths from malnutrition. Government departments continue to research and publish papers on new improved fire retardant thatch for village homes, but fund only the construction of pucca cement roofs. The disconnect between the resolve and the reality is so complete it is hard to know when to laugh, when to cry.KnowledgeA recent article described the inauguration of a speed breaker on a national highway. While the speed breaker was decorated with Rangoli, the road was closed for the day. In the evening, a Hindu priest recited shlokas, and the minister of Surface Transport got on all fours and broke a coconut against the speed breaker. Though the inauguration caused a 12 km truck traffic jam, the event was perceived by all to be essential, a successful integration of new infrastructure with traditional ritual. I reread the piece to figure out whether this was a serious report or satire. But even after several readings could not tell. In most situations, it is hard to tell the two apart.advertisementTry stopping someone on the road for directions. He points vaguely in the direction that your car faces, and asks you to continue to go straight, then gesturing towards the right with his arm he will ask you to turn left; and suggest you ask someone there. By ensuring that you are now doubly confused, he will have at least conveyed that he is in the know of things, a man about town; his vanity must be salvaged at all costs.Rarely will someone say “My knowledge of this neighbourhood lacks the urban coordinates, landmarks and magnetic pole positions that would allow me to do justice to your enquiry. Could I direct you to someone better informed, more trustworthy and infinitely more courteous than myself.”UnrealPart of the Indian failure to complete the preparations for the Commonwealth Games on time was the inability to realistically assess situations, and to say, No, Give it to Fiji. They’ll do a better job. At every press conference pointed questions about tardiness and sloppy work were addressed with phrases like, “We are doing our best. We are giving everything we have. The whole nation is praying for success. We must put our best foot forward. It’s in God’s hands.” Public briefings and press releases speak to a nation as if addressing a child’s birthday party.Everyday, every paper, every report becomes a mix of the serious and frivolous, part truth, part moral indignation, part hope. A cover for the darker stains of India. Thieving forest officials, military attacks on Naxals and Kashmiris, food godowns brimming with rotting wheat, rural malnutrition and farmer suicides, incomplete international games, falling bridges, waterlogged cities, the daily upheavals are tinged with comedy. In a place with an increasing quantum of daily human suffering, heightened public expectation, and the cartoon characters that pose as potential providers, comic relief becomes the only way to assuage collective guilt. Laugh and forget.Some years ago, in a supposedly successful television campaign to sell the country to foreigners under the title of Incredible India, a television ad showed a variety of images: a Kuchipudi dancer, a remote Rajasthani palace, a set of sand dunes, a snow covered mountain, an empty beach, a Buddhist monk in a hill side monastery. Every image distilled into a picture book pastoral stillness. So removed was it from the real experience of India, that the campaign was bound to succeed. An outright lie, it reinforced every picturesque stereotype of traditional India. Wherever possible, words, images and other forms of sensory stimulation are an essential buffer from the real India. The unreal, the imagined, the hoped for, the preferred, the recalled, eventually become a messy amalgam in the daily life of the country. It is hard to tell one from the other.When my son was just a kid I’d take him to Appu Ghar to ride in Bump’Em cars. He would maneuvre his car very carefully, giving signals and ensuring he didn’t hit any one, and I would need to goad him into active hostility: Drive like you are on a Delhi road. The real world was an outright lie. It has taken him a few years to learn, but he has.advertisementThe writer is an architectlast_img read more

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