The cry of a public servant under the David Granger Administration

first_imgDear Editor,I have been pondering for quite a while now on whether I should publicly express my disdain for the blatant lack of empathy and discrimination bestowed upon me by my employer at a Government agency. I’ve recently completed my MSc and am now serving the Government.Since my return, just under a year, I haven’t received an added cent in remuneration. On the contrary, my workload doubled and I still have the same job as I initially had before my departure to study. And to add insult to injury, my supervisor is a fresh graduate who has just completed his bachelor from UG. And best of all, I had to train him.I made several complaints to PSM about my mistreatment, but nothing was done. It’s as if you have no one to turn to but to endure. I must say, I’m quite disheartened and completely demotivated. My enthusiasm has now morphed into passive resistance. And I’m not the only one. I know of tens of other young professionals, both Indians and Afro-Guyanese, who are going through the same. There is no future under this Government for us. That is the sad reality.Sincerely,Mr Engineerlast_img read more

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Ending Poverty in Africa: How Serious Is Liberia in This Fight?

first_imgThe World Bank Group (WBG) in recent days celebrated its “Africa End Poverty.”The Bank emphasized the cardinal role of public policy in providing a level playing field for everyone in society to feel the impact of government. But how serious is Liberia in the fight to end poverty?Actually, we in Liberia should not be talking about poverty. Why? Because Liberia is richly endowed with natural resources that are absent in many African countries that are striving to end poverty.We have often in our Editorials referred to some countries beyond Africa, notably South Korea and Singapore, which in 1960 were on the same economic plane as Liberia. But because of the shortsightedness, corruption and lack of patriotism that have bedeviled Liberia for so many generations, we are as we are today, one of the world’s poorest and most backward countries. Korea and Singapore, on the contrary, are among the world’s richest and most highly developed nations.But let us look right here in Africa at two relatively new countries, Rwanda and Botswana. Liberia is far older, far richer than either of these countries. Yes, Botswana has diamonds and cattle. And Rwanda, like Botswana, too, has very little rainfall. Contrast either country with Liberia, which is endowed with vast iron ore deposits, as well as gold, diamond and rain that falls at least six months in each year. Yet we cannot feed ourselves and have to import most of our food, including our staple, rice, and most of the meat we eat.Yet we have places in Liberia, including Grand Cess in Grand Kru County, Lofa and Nimba Counties where cattle can grow naturally. But neither the government nor private individuals have bothered to raise cattle. Instead, we depend for our beef on half sick cattle from rain-starved Mali. Botswana, on the other hand, is a major exporter of beef.Rwanda, too, has taken great advantage of something that Liberian has in abundance—tourist attractions. The difference with Liberia is that neither the Liberian government nor private individuals have bothered to take advantage of these attractions; for example, our rich culture, Lake Piso and the entire Grand Cape Mount County and our 350-mile coastline on which beaches abound.Rwandans, on the contrary, have used their innovation to turn almost every part of their country into tourist sites to help boost the economy.Botswana is a landlocked country threatened by savanna grassland and the Kalahari Desert, and its only mineral resource is diamond, which Liberia also has in abundance.Botswana, too, has dwelt on ethical value to denounce corruption and preach equality and morality in order to build the least corrupt society on the African continent.Travelers who visit those countries all speak of the improvements that have been made there in recent years. Yet Liberians, especially our government officials, including our President, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, cannot emulate these far younger African nations.How serious is Liberia to end poverty in line with the World Bank’s goal? Look at all the great opportunities we have missed year in, year out. Take all the beautifully made geographical landscapes God has given us. What have we been waiting for all these years to turn them into tourism sites to bring revenue to the country? Tourism brings not only money, including loads of hard currency; but also employment and development. Nearly every week this newspaper carries stories of major international hotel chains opening modern hotel complexes in various parts of Africa, and we have since the war—and not even in the past 12 years of the Ellen Sirleaf administration, been able to fix the Ducor, West Africa’s first five star hotel. Pray tell us why.Poor Liberia; when are we ever going to get a government that will seriously engage in the fight against poverty by putting to work the great and serious advantages we have, the rich endowments that the God of nations has bestowed upon us?Within the next two weeks we have a chance to elect a new president of Liberia. What we must do now is to determine who between the two contestants in the presidential run-off is better prepared to wage the serious, vigorous, persistent and committed fight against poverty?Some of what we have said in this Editorial can be used as benchmarks to start this fight against poverty. But will our leaders take note of them? Will they involve the media, at least the serious parts of the Liberian media, to help chart the course in this great challenge of the moment—fighting and defeating poverty in Liberia and setting our nation, at long last, on the path to economic and social development?That remains to be seen.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Newly declassified documents reveal Nixon deceptions

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week On May 31, 1970, a month after Nixon went on TV to defend the previously secret U.S. bombings and troop movements in Cambodia, asserting that he would not let his nation become “a pitiful, helpless giant,” the president met his top military and national security aides at the Western White House in San Clemente, Calif. Revelation of the operation had sparked protests and congressional action against what many lawmakers from both parties considered an illegal war. Nixon noted that Americans believed the Cambodian operation was “all but over,” even as 14,000 troops were engaged across the border in a hunt for North Vietnamese operating there. In a memo from the meeting marked “Eyes Only, Top Secret Sensitive,” Nixon told his military men to continue doing what was necessary in Cambodia, but to say for public consumption that the United States was merely providing support to South Vietnamese forces when necessary to protect U.S. troops. “That is what we will say publicly,” he asserted. “But now, let’s talk about what we will actually do.” He instructed: “I want you to put the air in there and not spare the horses. Do not withdraw for domestic reasons but only for military reasons.” WASHINGTON – Even after Richard Nixon’s secret war in Cambodia became known, the president persisted in deception. “Publicly, we say one thing,” he told aides. “Actually, we do another.” Newly declassified documents from the Nixon years shed light on the Vietnam War, the struggle with the Soviet Union for global influence and a president who tried not to let public and congressional opinion get in his way. They also show an administration determined to win re-election in 1972, with Nixon aides seeking ways to use Jimmy Hoffa to tap into the labor movement. The former Teamsters president had been pardoned by Nixon in 1971. The release Wednesday of some 50,000 pages by the National Archives means about half the national security files from the Nixon era now are public. “We have taken all the heat on this one.” He went on: “Just do it. Don’t come back and ask permission each time.” The military chiefs, more than their civilian bosses, expressed worry about how the war was going. “If the enemy is allowed to recover this time, we are through,” said Adm. Thomas H. Moorer, the naval operations chief who two months later would become chairman of the Joint Chiefs. Nixon told his aides to plan offensive operations in neutral Laos, continue U.S. air operations in Cambodia and work on a summer offensive in South Vietnam. “We cannot sit here and let the enemy believe that Cambodia is our last gasp.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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