DaCosta, Walker tipped to take ‘Trials’ double

first_imgThe three-year-old campaign leading up to the 1000 and 2000 Guineas in April reaches a crucial stage at Caymanas Park today with the $1.3 million Thornbird Stakes for native-bred fillies and the Prince Consort Stakes for colts and geldings, both sponsored by Front Runner, sharing the spotlight over 1400 metres. The fillies, in particular, have been lighting up the campaign, and going into this their final prep, the 11 declared coming to ensure an intriguing contest. Among the principals are the hat-trick seekers RUNALLDAY from the Anthony ‘Baba’ Nunes stables, BILINGUAL, who is also trained by Nunes, and Dwight Chen’s MARLENE MY LOVE, All three have looked potential classic winners but may need to show further improvement to stop the classy SHE’S A MANEATER, who has won four races from five carer starts, including a fast-time win over this trip in January. Trained by 16-time champion Wayne DaCosta for owner Winston Kong, the free-running bay filly by Natural Selection out of the 2009 ‘Horse of the Year’ Ahwhofah lost her only race on Boxing Day when caught and beaten by the grey colt SOTOMAYOR in the $4..25 million Supreme Ventures Jamaica 2-Y-O Stakes over a mile, a race in which she turned for home a clear leader. However, she showed in her last race that she had definitely trained on, winning impressively ahead of subsequent winner ANOTHER FURY in the good time of 1;25.3 with customary rider, reigning champion jockey Omar Walker aboard. She continues to look sharp at exercise, and having won twice over this trip, her proven class should ensure that nothing overhauls her in the closing stages. Three time winner DaCosta and Walker should complete the feature race double with recent winner FEARLESS SAMURAI in the Prince Consort Stakes to be contested by nine starters. The chestnut colt by Fearless Vision out of Sayuri has won three races from five starts, but really turned heads last time out when slamming MONEY MAGNET over 1100 metres, covering the distance in the smart time of 1:06.0. FEARLESS SAMURAI (working well) will be seen to even better advantage over this trip, and despite the strong claims of hat-trick seeker DON CHASSIS and recent winner DONTAE, he should take a lot of catching. A notable absentee from the line-up is the ‘Baba’ Nunes-trained SOTOMAYOR, who has bypassed the Prince Consort Stakes in preference for the 3-y-o and up overnight allowance mile, a race he should win ahead of the in-form IAN LINKS, now stepping up to a mile. Other firm fancies on the card are LAWS OF THE CODE in the first race, ZEPHYR in the third, BIG BLACK NATION in the fourth, TIZ A VIBE in the fifth and SUBBIE in the seventh.last_img read more

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Scientists Not Always Trained to Be Critical Thinkers

first_imgA trainer of graduate students at a prestigious university wants to put the Ph back in PhD.Can scientists be good at detail work but dumb at logic? Gundula Bosch thinks so. She directs the R3 Graduate Science Initiative at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. In Nature, she says she’s on a campaign to “Train PhD students to be thinkers not just specialists.” She explains an alarming trend in graduate schools that betrays the historic purpose of a top-level education:Under pressure to turn out productive lab members quickly, many PhD programmes in the biomedical sciences have shortened their courses, squeezing out opportunities for putting research into its wider context. Consequently, most PhD curricula are unlikely to nurture the big thinkers and creative problem-solvers that society needs.As a result of the pressure, “That means students are taught every detail of a microbe’s life cycle but little about the life scientific.” Without formal training in philosophy of science, scientists can become very skilled at detailed lab procedures but clueless about logic. Can they recognize a logical fallacy? Are they being forewarned of the pitfalls of flawed research?Above all, students must be shown the scientific process as it is — with its limitations and potential pitfalls as well as its fun side, such as serendipitous discoveries and hilarious blunders.Some blunders are not so hilarious. There can be societal consequences for not thinking ahead. But some serendipitous discoveries are hilarious, like when Kekule said he discovered the structure of benzene after dreaming about a snake eating its tail. Cases like that led to Murphy’s Technology Law, “All great discoveries are made by mistake.” Don’t omit the corollary: ‘The greater the funding, the longer it takes to find the mistake.” There are lists of these, like the one at Mental Floss, which lists 24 serendipitous discoveries of everything from Velcro to Viagra.I was startled by the oft-expressed opinion that scientific productivity depended more on rote knowledge than on competence in critical thinking.The lack of training in critical thinking shows up in retractions, corrections and the worrisome “reproducibility crisis” (4 April 2017). It also leads to public mistrust of science, like when nutrition scientists have reversed their positions on eggs, sugar, fat, the Food Pyramid, and other matters over time.Blunders and dangers of this sort prompted Bosch to start a program at her institution, Johns Hopkins, to put the Ph back in PhD: Doctor of Philosophy. Before William Whewell coined the label “scientist,” investigators of the natural world called themselves natural philosophers. A specialist in any scientific world is really not worthy of the letters PhD without some philosophical training.We call our programme R3, which means that our students learn to apply rigour to their design and conduct of experiments; view their work through the lens of social responsibility; and to think critically, communicate better, and thus improve reproducibility. Although we are aware of many innovative individual courses developed along these lines, we are striving for more-comprehensive reform.Lemmings, by JB Greene. Used by permission.Her program encourages students to evaluate case studies in fraud and misconduct, as well as poor design that leads to flawed conclusions. Somewhat surprisingly, she’s running into resistance from science faculty. They don’t think they have the time for this mushy stuff: nothing a cup of coffee can’t solve:Introducing our programme to colleagues in the Johns Hopkins life-sciences departments was even more sensitive. I was startled by the oft-expressed opinion that scientific productivity depended more on rote knowledge than on competence in critical thinking. Several principal investigators were uneasy about students committing more time to less conventional forms of education. The best way to gain their support was coffee: we repeatedly met lab heads to understand their concerns.Once hearing their concerns, Bosch sought to convince them it is worth the time. She argued, “better critical thinking and fewer mandatory discipline-specific classes might actually position students to be more productive.”Discussions about the bigger-picture problems of the scientific enterprise get students to reflect on the limits of science, and where science’s ability to do something competes with what scientists should do from a moral point of view.Bosch strives for “a better, more rational world” with these efforts. In her final sentence, Bosch accepts the fraught idea that science is “self-correcting,” but she believes it should also be “self-improving.” Such aspirations are not peculiar to science. Each individual, each institution, and each country should strive for the same.Don’t teach Darwinians critical thinking! It will destroy their whole cult! It would make them have to think of better explanations than, “It evolved” and “Stuff happens.” That’s too big a challenge for those needing to get molecules to become human brains. Good grief, they’ll have to stop using the Master List of Logical Fallacies as their “how-to” textbook!Bosch’s suggestions are good, but we wish she would add some material about groupthink, consensus, and courage to think outside the box. Notice that her suggestions presuppose values that should be aspirations for everyone: logical consistency (philosophy) and a commitment to honesty (morality). And yet we have a professional “science” enterprise dedicated to the proposition that we’re all products of a blind, amoral, unguided natural process. How do you “evolve” philosophy and morality out of that? As we repeatedly have to emphasize, naturalism is self-refuting. We quoted C. S. Lewis on that a few days ago (11 Feb 2018). Another of his quotes points out that there is really nothing truly unique about scientific thought except for its subject matter. This is another good quote to memorize:The physical sciences, then, depend on the validity of logic just as much as metaphysics or mathematics. If popular thought feels ‘science’ to be different from all other kinds of knowledge because science is experimentally verifiable, popular thought is mistaken. Experimental verification is not a new kind of assurance coming in to supply the deficiencies of mere logic. We should therefore abandon the distinction between scientific and non-scientific thought. The proper distinction is between logical and non-logical thought. (Visited 637 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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China’s Best Known Artist Arrested

first_imgThanks to Carl Levinson | Ai poster photo by Sanfamedia | Birds Nest photo by Edwin Lee April 3, 2011. Ai Weiwei was detained by two customs officers while crossing customs in Beijing Capital Airport. Just separated Ai Weiwei and his assistant. By the two customs officers taken to a separate location. Ai Weiwei’s phone has been shut off, and he’s already been out of contact for 50 minutes. The situation is unclear. Please everyone pay attention. (Note: This is an assistant tweeting.)Continued news on his detainment can be found there and on Ai’s Twitter account.According to the Washington Post, the police “also blocked off the streets to his studio and raided it, carting away laptops and the hard drive from the main computer…eight staff members and Ai’s wife, Lu Qing, were taken to the local police station for questioning.”Although Ai had increased China’s reputation in the world of art, he had yet to receive permission to stage a solo show in his home country. His February show was canceled due to political pressure and the Shanghai studio he built was demolished by order of the Chinese government. Ai’s arrest is not an isolated incident, nor, probably, just the workaday oppression of artists in China; it is instead part of a renewed crackdown, against an anticipated infection of freedom from the Mideast’s Jasmine Revolutions. Keith Richburg of the Washington Post theorizes that this is an attempt to further lower the level of expression in the country. Ai Weiwei was arrested yesterday at the Beijing Airport on his way to Hong Kong, the New Yorker reported. Ai, China’s best known artist, a global star and designer of the Beijing Olympics stadium, the Bird’s Nest, had plans to possibly leave China to live in Germany, where he had set up a studio, according to Deutsche Welle. We cover threats to free speech here, especially when those threats intersects the Web. Sometimes we know the people involved, as is the case with Ai. Our founder, Richard MacManus, took part in an historic conversation a year ago in New York with Ai. According to Richard, the quality that defined Ai the most for him was his curiosity and humility. It was an honour to meet Ai Weiwei in person last year in NYC. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but he came across as a very warm-hearted and curious person. He wanted to know all about what I do, even though he’s achieved much more than I have. Then during the discussion on stage, it became clear that he’s both very brave and always keen to challenge the status quo. He probes for the truth in whatever he says or does. One of his assistants posted this on Ai’s Tumblr account. Related Posts curt hopkins 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex…center_img 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Tags:#art#Breaking#international#news#politics#web 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe Applast_img read more

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United States mens soccer team silences Jamaica in Crew Stadium 10

Members of the United State’s men’s national soccer team like to think of Crew Stadium as home. The American’s most recent visit to Columbus is yet another example of why there’s no place like home. The U.S. improved its all-time record at Crew Stadium to 6-0-3 with a 1-0 win against Jamaica in a 2014 World Cup qualifying match Tuesday. American forward Herculez Gomez struck a set-piece goal in the 55th minute to give the Americans a lead it wouldn’t relinquish. U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard also helped keep a shutout intact for the Americans, who avenged their 2-1 loss to Jamaica on Friday in Kingston, Jamaica. With the win, the U.S. moves into a three-way tie for first-place in its World Cup qualifying group with Jamaica and Guatemala. The Guatemalans defeated Antigua and Barbuda Tuesday, 1-0, to keep pace in the group, from which only the top two teams can advance in World Cup qualifying. The Americans will resume World Cup qualifying Oct. 12 with a game against the group’s last-place team, Antigua and Barbuda, in St. John’s, Antigua. Crew Stadium was a powder keg and the U.S. came close to lighting the fuse numerous times in the first half. Chance after chance went just wide of Jamaican keeper Dwayne Miller’s goal. American midfielder Graham Zusi set the tone for the first half when he clanked an 18-yard shot off the upper right corner of Miller’s goal, which was besieged in the first half. All told, three U.S. shots caromed off the posts of Miller’s net by the time 30 minutes had passed. Other U.S. attempts whistled wide as the American fans standing on temporary bleachers waited to erupt. Howard, by comparison, wasn’t tested once in the opening half, and his teammates kept the pressure up on the other end of the field, outshooting Jamaica, 8-0, in the opening 45 minutes. Jamaica was barely hanging on, but the Americans weren’t able to break through and the teams went to half in a scoreless tie. Fans remained at a roar as the second half began and before long, the moment the entire stadium had been waiting for finally arrived in the 55th minute. After the U.S. earned a free kick from about 25 yards out, Gomez stepped to the ball and bent his kick around a wall of Jamaican defenders. Miller made a full-stretch lunge to save the shot, but could only manage to get part of his left hand on Gomez’s rip from distance. The white twine of the net rippled and Gomez had put the U.S. up, 1-0, to spark Crew Stadium to life. From there on out, it was all defense for the U.S. and few additional offensive chances.  Howard and his backline of defenders managed to deal with Jamaica’s three second-half shot. In the midfield, Jermaine Jones, a dual citizen of America and Germany, pushed and muscled his way around the field to stop the Jamaican attacks. Jamaica never had a shot on goal. In the 82nd minute, Howard skied to tip a seemingly threatening corner kick away from the mouth of his goal, and most of the 23,881 still in attendance roared with approval. Jamaica, nicknamed the “Reggae Boyz,” wouldn’t mount another serious attack.  After three minutes of extra time, Honduran referee Jose Pineda blew his whistle to end the game and send the packed stadium into one final frenzied cheer. read more

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Commentary Like old times The Masters is Tiger Woods v the field

One of the most exciting tournaments in golf is finally here. The top players in the world will stroll down Magnolia Lane to tee it up at the legendary Augusta National Golf Course for The Masters, the first of four annual major championships on the Professional Golfers Association Tour. The 93-player field will feature top players, past champions and even the youngest competitor in Masters’ history: 14-year-old Tianlang Guan from China, who won the Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship in November to punch his ticket to Augusta, Ga. (I couldn’t imagine doing anything of this magnitude at age 14). This year’s edition features a common theme from past Masters tournaments: Tiger Woods versus the rest of the field. With three wins in five starts on the 2013 PGA Tour, and regaining the No. 1 ranking in the world after a whirlwind three years, I think Woods is a shoe-in to win for the fifth time at Augusta National. Woods is definitely my favorite to win the Masters, but here are my top-10 players who can also win the green jacket: 1. Brandt Snedeker: If there is anyone in the world who is as hot as Woods, it’s the 32-year-old from Nashville. The winner of the season-long race for last year’s FedEx Cup, Snedeker carried that momentum into 2013, posting a win and four top-three finishes in just seven starts so far on the PGA Tour. 2. Matt Kuchar: After finishing T-3 in last year’s Masters, and picking up a win earlier this year at the World Golf Championship Accenture Match Play Championship, Kuchar’s consistency over the last three years with 21 top-10 finishes makes him a key player to look for this year. 3. Justin Rose: The Englishman hasn’t finished worse than T-17 in eight events on the PGA and European tours this season. Expect him to be in the mix late afternoon on Sunday. 4. Rory McIlroy: The 23-year-old Northern Irishman has had an eventful year so far, highlighted by the switch to Nike golf clubs and inconsistent play so far. But last week’s second-place finish at the Valero Texas Open gave him the confidence he needed to try to win his third major championship. 5. Dustin Johnson: The big-hitting American’s power of the tee will be crucial to his success this week. Look for him to score some low numbers on the par-5s, and this could be the year for him to break through for his first major championship. 6. Phil Mickelson: A three-time Masters champion playing in his favorite event? You know Lefty is going to bring his A-game to Augusta this week. 7. Lee Westwood: His success in majors in astonishing, except for one stat: wins. Westwood has yet to win that first major, despite having eight top-10 finishes in the last 16 majors. 8. Bubba Watson: The emotional roller-coaster, and last year’s Masters’ champion, Watson knows what it takes to win at Augusta, especially with his incredible shot-shaping abilities. 9. Ian Poulter: The 37-year-old Englishman knows how to thrive on golf’s biggest stages. A Ryder Cup hero for the Europeans, Poulter will look to improve from his seventh place finish last year. 10. Keegan Bradley: Another big-hitting American, poised to add a second major championship to his impressive resume. When he won the 2011 PGA Championship as a rookie, everyone knew he could handle the pressure of a big-time tournament. read more

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Ohio State field hockey falls short in opening Labor Day weekend

Then-sophomore forward Peanut Johnson (3) advances the ball during a game against Indiana Oct. 26 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU lost, 6-5.Lantern file photoOhio State field hockey opened its 2014 campaign with a pair of tough losses against No. 5 Syracuse and unranked Albany.The Buckeyes hung tough with the Orange at home Friday, losing 3-2 in overtime following a fierce comeback. They couldn’t rebound Monday, however, as they were shutout, 4-0, on the road in Albany, N.Y.After trailing for most of the game Friday, the Buckeyes scored two goals within nine minutes to force overtime against the Orange. Syracuse junior forward Emma Russell then sealed the game with a shot from close range off a rebound in overtime.OSU appeared outmatched early, but managed to fight back late behind its veteran leadership.“I think the first half was our eye-opener,” senior midfielder Kaitlyn Wagner said. “But we’re a young team and realized we were getting bullied around.”The Buckeyes struggled to move the ball into scoring position in the first half when they were outshot 17-2 in the first 35 minutes of play.The majority of the action was played on OSU’s side of the field, but freshman goalkeeper Liz Tamburro kept her team alive in her debut, recording five first half saves, which allowed her teammates to strike back late.“She made some incredible saves, and every time a goalie makes a save like that, it gives the team a lot of confidence,” OSU coach Anne Wilkinson said. “As a freshman, that’s a lot to ask.”With 1:57 to play in the opening half, Tamburro’s shield finally cracked. Syracuse’s senior back Jordan Page broke free on the left side of the pitch and scored unassisted to give the Orange a 1-0 lead at halftime.Things changed in the second half when OSU went on the attack. Junior back Emma Royce said the team was determined to get to any ball in question during the second period.“We just decided that the 50-50 balls weren’t going to be 50-50 balls anymore,” Royce, a London native and team co-captain, said. “They were going to be our balls.”The Buckeyes trailed 2-0 after an early second half goal from Syracuse junior midfielder Alyssa Manley, but OSU countered quickly.Wagner scored on a penalty stroke after a Syracuse foul, and with more than 16 minutes to play, junior forward Peanut Johnson broke free and scored from seven yards out off a pass from freshman forward Maddy Humphrey.Tamburro finished the game with 11 saves, tying with the seventh most in single game school history since 2001. The Orange outshot the Buckeyes 37-11 overall, and had a 13-3 advantage in penalty corners.“Going into Albany, we need to attack more and dictate the tempo,” Wilkinson said after the loss.But the Buckeyes had no such luck, allowing two first half goals from Albany sophomore midfielder Paula Heuser and senior midfielder Amy Nicklin.Heuser converted on her second goal of the game in the second half, and freshman midfielder Anna Bottino scored on a fast break to cap the 4-0 shutout.The Buckeyes will try to pick up their first win of the season Friday when they’re scheduled to take on Miami (Ohio) at Buckeye Varsity Field at 5 p.m. read more

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Chelsea close to stunning double scoop for coach player

first_imgChelsea look set to pinch Napoli midfielder Jorginho from rivals Manchester City this summer, claims Gianluca Di MarzioWhile it has been City who were expected to sign the Italy international following long talks with Napoli since the end of last season, they have struggled to agree on a final transfer fee with the Serie A club.City boss Pep Guardiola had hoped to have Jorginho signed in time for the start of pre-season with the rest of the club’s non-World Cup players for this week, but it appears that he will now miss out on his top transfer target altogether.The Catalan coach has only ever been interested in signing new players completely committed to joining his club, which is why he elected to allow Alexis Sanchez to join City’s locals rivals Manchester United in January.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.In light of this, Chelsea have now leapfrogged City in the race for Jorginho and view him as the perfect compromise with Napoli.The Blues are hoping that by paying more for Jorginho, they can convince the Italian club to part with former head coach Maurizio Sarri after refusing to pay a huge compensation bill for his release from his contract.While City had only been willing to splash out on £45m for Jorginho, Chelsea are ready to spend up to £57m.last_img read more

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Dixon Calls for Calm Ahead of First Freddie Gray Trial

first_imgSheila Dixon (Courtesy Photo)Sheila Dixon, candidate for mayor of Baltimore, on Nov. 24 called for calm ahead of the upcoming trial of William Porter.Porter is one of the six police officers facing numerous charges in the death of Freddie Gray earlier this year. His trial is set to begin ion Nov. 30 in front of Judge Barry Williams.“I know there is a lot of hurt and pain concerning the tragic death of Freddie Gray. I also know there is a lack of faith and distrust over the legal process, but it’s a process that must be allowed to play out in the court of law. I am asking all residents to be respectful of the trial that begins on November 30th, and if you feel the need to protest during the trial to do so respectfully and peacefully,” Dixon said in a statement. Dixon was previously the 48th mayor of Baltimore. (Freddie Gray Jury will be Anonymous, not Sequestered, page D2)last_img read more

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Amphibious fish found to use evaporative cooling to overcome hot water

first_img Citation: Amphibious fish found to use evaporative cooling to overcome hot water (2015, October 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-10-amphibious-fish-evaporative-cooling-hot.html Mangrove rivulus. Credit: Wikipedia There are many varieties of amphibious fish—those fish that jump or crawl out of the water to hang out on land for awhile, but until now, no one has seen an example of one that jumps out of the water to use evaporative cooling to chill its body after swimming in water that was too hot. Prior research had shown that mangrove rivulus jump (or more accurately flip themselves out of the water by bending then releasing quickly) but it was not clear why they did so—other amphibious fish have been known to get out of the water if CO2 build up, or if there were pollutants, or even to snag a meal, but that did not seem to apply to the mangrove rivulus.To find out more about the fish (which look sort of like tadpoles) the researchers raised some specimens for a year in tanks in their lab, at a temperature of 25 or 30°C and also collected wild adults and put them in tanks in their lab too, and acclimated them for a time at the same temperature as those they had raised. Then, they watched and filmed (with a thermal imaging camera) what happened as the temperature of the water was raised. The fish, as expected hurled themselves out of the tank onto “shore”—when the temperature reached approximately 36°C. The researchers also enclosed the fish tanks so that they could create different levels of humidity and found that the fish cooled better in lower humidity environments. They also found that despite high humidity, the fish could all cool themselves down to ambient temperature within minutes. In studying the fish, the researchers found that not only was it able to use evaporative cooling, but its behavior also demonstrated plasticity, because it was dependent on recent acclimation history rather than conditioning when they were young. This suggests the fish is remarkably well suited to handling warmer waters as the planet heats up. More information: Out of the frying pan into the air—emersion behaviour and evaporative heat loss in an amphibious mangrove fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus), Biology Letters, Published 21 October 2015.DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0689 AbstractAmphibious fishes often emerse (leave water) when faced with unfavourable water conditions. How amphibious fishes cope with the risks of rising water temperatures may depend, in part, on the plasticity of behavioural mechanisms such as emersion thresholds. We hypothesized that the emersion threshold is reversibly plastic and thus dependent on recent acclimation history rather than on conditions during early development. Kryptolebias marmoratus were reared for 1 year at 25 or 30°C and acclimated as adults (one week) to either 25 or 30°C before exposure to an acute increase in water temperature. The emersion threshold temperature and acute thermal tolerance were significantly increased in adult fish acclimated to 30°C, but rearing temperature had no significant effect. Using a thermal imaging camera, we also showed that emersed fish in a low humidity aerial environment (30°C) lost significantly more heat (3.3°C min−1) than those in a high humidity environment (1.6°C min−1). In the field, mean relative humidity was 84%. These results provide evidence of behavioural avoidance of high temperatures and the first quantification of evaporative cooling in an amphibious fish. Furthermore, the avoidance response was reversibly plastic, flexibility that may be important for tropical amphibious fishes under increasing pressures from climatic change.Press release This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Biology Letterscenter_img (Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with the University of Guelph and Brock University, both in Canada, has found the first example of an amphibious fish using evaporative cooling to chill its overheated body. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the researchers describe their study that included raising Kryptolebias marmoratus, aka mangrove rivulus, to adulthood and then testing them by heating the water in which they lived. © 2015 Phys.org Explore further Flipping fish adapt to land living (w/ Video)last_img read more

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