Wednesday people roundup

first_imgState Street Global Advisors – Adam Grainger has been appointed COO of the European defined contribution business. Over the last six years, he has worked for JP Morgan Asset Management and BlackRock, among others. Based in London, he will be looking to expand State Street’s DC operations in Ireland and across Continental Europe.European Central Bank – The ECB is hiring a head of division for bond market and international operations. The new hire will be responsible for contributing to the management of the ECB’s pension funds, among other things. The position is in the Directorate General Market Operations, with applications open until 15 June. Auriel Capital – The UK-based institutional asset management firm has appointed Antti Savilaakso as a partner. Savilaakso joins from MSCI, where he was head of ESG research for EMEA. Before then, he worked in ESG analysis and portfolio management for more than 10 years at Nordea Asset Management.CFA Institute – Colin McLean has been elected vice-chair of the board of governors of the global association of investment management professionals. Effective 1 September, he will succeed Frederic Lebel, who will become the elected chair of the board. McLean is the first non-Charterholder to hold the role of vice-chair. He is chief executive at SVM Asset Management, a fund management group based in Edinburgh.Invesco Perpetual – Thomas Moore has been appointed to the investment manager’s Henley fixed interest investment team. He joins from Morgan Stanley & Co, where he was managing director and head of European credit analytics. Moore was at Morgan Stanley for 12 years, having been at Orion Consultants in New York before then.Savills Investment Management – James Bury has been named chief executive of the company’s European business, reporting to global chief executive Justin O’Connor. Bury was previously the manager’s COO, a role that also saw him sit on its management board.International Property Security Exchange – Robert Bould has been named non-executive director of the London-based exchange. Bould was previously chief executive of GVA Bilfinger and executive vice-president of Bilfinger Real Estate in Germany. KPA Pension, Nordea, Amundi, State Street Global Advisors, European Central Bank, Auriel Capital, MSCI, CFA Institute, Invesco Perpetual, Morgan Stanley & Co, Savills Investment Management, International Property Security Exchange, GVA BilfingerKPA Pension – Britta Burreau has been named chief executive of the Swedish pension provider, filling the vacancy left last year following Erik Thedéen’s decision to join the country’s regulator, Finansinspektionen. Burreau, who has been chief executive of Nordea Liv & Pension Sweden since 2004, will join in December. Johan Nystedt, currently CFO at Nordea Liv & Pension, will succeed Burreau as chief executive from June.Amundi – The France-based asset manager has created a global advisory board. Hubert Védrine, former foreign affairs minister of France, will chair the board, which will also include the following people:Helen Alexander, former president of the Confederation of British IndustrySimon Fraser, former permanent secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth OfficeEnrico Letta, former prime minister of ItalyMaurice Levy, chairman and chief executive at Publicis GroupePatrick Ponsolle, former vice-chairman at Morgan Stanley InternationalJurgen Stark, former member of the executive board and governing Council of the ECBIsabel Tocino Biscarolasaga, former minister of the environment in SpainTatsuo Yamasaki, former vice-minister of finance for Japanlast_img read more

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Group home rules approved

first_img“I believe that this council and everybody here has done everything we can under the law to put an ordinance on the books that can help,” Councilman Greg Nordbak said. “We are better off with this ordinance than 12 months ago.” The new law, which still must be approved a second time by the council, bans boarding homes, residential-care facilities and shelters in single-family residential areas and requires a conditional-use permit for them in other areas of the city. Permits for shelters and residential-care facilities would require a management plan detailing how the residents would be supervised, staffing levels, security and overall house rules. Boarding houses could have no more than five people in them or two people per room. Gloria Avila, one of the residents who has been concerned about Perez’s intentions, said Wednesday she believes the law will help. “We’ve got an ordinance in the city of Whittier that recognizes these things are going to happen,” Avila said. “\ something to refer back to now. There are more regulations on these kind of homes.” However, there is a potential loophole in the law, city officials said. Federal and state laws don’t allow the city to regulate families, said Krista Jee, assistant city attorney. Jee said some sober-living homes in other cities have called themselves “families” as a way to get around local regulations. It’s difficult to make a distinction between a family or a boarding house, Jee said. “Cities are not allowed to make a distinction of a family based upon the relationship of the individuals,” Jee said. “It can’t be a requirement that they are biologically related.” The ordinance defines a family as two or more people living together that is a “relatively permanent bona-fide housekeeping unit.” It must have a “relationship based upon birth, marriage or other domestic bond of social, economic and psychological commitments to each other.” Perez, who sparked the controversy by proposing to put a sober-living home at his house, said he doesn’t believe the ordinance will affect his plans. In a sober-living establishment, no treatment is provided, but individuals in recovery are expected to maintain an alcohol- and drug-free lifestyle by establishing a living environment that supports sobriety and recovery. As long as there are no more than six people and treatment isn’t provided, the state doesn’t regulate it. “This is going to be a family home with people with many disabilities,” he said. “There will be no criminal element. “I’m only interested in helping people who were beginning to have a problem,” Perez said. “It’s going to be a nurturing family home. It’s not a threat to anybody.” mike.sprague@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – The City Council has approved an ordinance adding regulations to boarding houses, residential-care facilities and shelters as a way of responding to concerns about a proposed sober-living home in the Palm Park area. A sober-living home was proposed about a year ago for a house in the 10000 block area of Orange Drive. However, this proposal by Jerry Perez, owner of the home, led residents to picket and make an appeal to the city. The ordinance approved unanimously Tuesday is the city’s answer. last_img read more

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