Four first-time winners at Algona

first_imgBy Greg GrabianowskiALGONA, Iowa (Aug. 24) – Rob Hughes, John Wiemann, Doug Wickman and Jay DeVries all won features at Algona Raceway for the first time in 2013 to highlight the night of dirt track racing on Saturday, Aug. 24. The most dramatic race of the night came in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod feature. Mike Carlson started on the pole and grabbed the early lead before an early challenge from Phil Ricke as two went door-to-door for two laps. The only caution of the race waved on lap six. George Nordman, who started 11th, weaved his way into contention for the final five laps to put the heat on Carlson. Nordman patiently stayed behind Carlson until turn two on the final lap when he slid past on the bottom of the track and went on to the victory. Carlson was second with Nick Meyer placing third. Shane Swanson was fourth and Ricke rounded out the top five cars. Mick Monahan was the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature’s early leader before Philip Lusson wrestled the lead away on lap three. Lusson held the lead until lap seven when Wickman steered his no. 24W to front on lap eight and went on to the win.Lusson finished as the runner-up followed by Brandon Nielsen, Devin Smith and Chad Gentz.The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature was run without a stoppage of action as Wiemann lead at the end of the first lap and held the lead throughout the 12-lap race to earn his first feature win of the year at the track.David Smith was second with Calvin Lange finishing third. Tom Sierck was fourth and Dan Hanselman placed fifth. Pole sitter Rob Hughes won the IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified main ahead of Tad Reutzel, Ryan Watnem and Dustin Smith. DeVries won his first Mach-1 Sport Compact feature of the year.last_img read more

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Men’s tennis: Badgers kick off Big Ten Tournament versus Cornhuskers

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s tennis team (13–11, 5–6 Big Ten) will kick off the Big Ten Tournament versus Nebraska (11–14, 1–10 Big Ten) from Iowa City, Iowa.The Badgers enter the conference tournament ranked as the No. 6 seed where the Cornhuskers are No. 11. This will be the second time the two teams will face each other this year with Wisconsin taking the first matchup 4–3.Though the Badgers won their last decision, it was too close for comfort for Wisconsin as the two teams split their singles matches 3–3 with the winning point coming down to doubles where Chema Carranza and Josef Dodridge took care of business yet again in the No. 1 slot 6–1.Softball: Badgers finish off Boilermakers at home Sunday to win seriesThe University of Wisconsin Softball Team (22–17, 6–6 Big Ten) played host to Purdue (13–34, 4–10 Big Ten) in a Read…The Carranza Dodridge duo could very easily be a factor again in this one. Though they’ve faced some tough matches of late, the doubles team is still ranked No. 8 in the nation on the ITA Collegiate Tennis Rankings with a 27–3 overall record.Carranza also looks to be a factor in singles play, going 8–2 in his last 10 matches with the second most wins on the team at 20–13. Daniel Soyfer is the only player on the Badgers who had a better record this season at 23–11 overall.On Nebraska, Toby Boyer and Linus Erhart will be taking on Carranza and Dodridge in the No. 1 doubles slot with an impressive 11–7 overall record going 3–2 in Big Ten matches.Boyer is also their top player in singles, going 11–8 in the No. 1 slot on the year for Nebraska. But Erhart will also be an issue in the No. 2 slot as the senior is 18–7 on the year.Women’s Tennis: Badgers halt seven-game skid in time for end of seasonThis weekend the Wisconsin Women’s Tennis Team was matched up with the University of Iowa and finally stole a “w.” Read…If Wisconsin can get past their first-round matchup versus Nebraska, they’ll face No. 3 Michigan tomorrow. Though they are ranked No. 12 in the nation, the Badgers played Michigan tightly in their first contest two weeks ago and should make for an entertaining match if Wisconsin can advance.Opening serve will begin at 2 p.m. today from Iowa City.last_img read more

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Husband gets 22 years for drowning wife

first_imgHead in bucket murderThirty-five-year-old Vindra Siriram, who was last month found guilty of killing his wife, Shelly Ann Persaud, four years ago, will spend the next 22 years in prison for submerging her head in a five-gallon bucket of water.Shelly-Ann Persaud was killed at the hands of her partner in June 2014Justice James Bovell-Drakes, who handed down the sentence at the High Court on Monday, encouraged the convicted husband to re-evaluate his conduct to be a better member of society.The woman’s lifeless body was found at the couple’s Friendship, East Bank Demerara home on June 10, 2014. The couple shared three children who were present when Persaud and Siriram argued while he was in a drunken state.His lawyer, Damian Da Silva, in a plea of mitigation had earlier appealed for leniency and stressed that the killing was a one-off unfortunate incident. State Prosecutor Seeta Bishundial responded that there were too many similar incidents involving intimate partners. She added that alcoholism and domestic violence had no place in Guyana’s society.In the probation report which was presented in court, it was observed that Siriram dropped out of school as a teenager and he learnt a trade at 15. It was also reported that he suffered from meningitis when he was very young and was given herbal treatment by his grandmother.Under examination by Bishundial, it was found that the probation report did not include how the death affected the young children in addition to several other concerns the State’s Attorney raised. As such, she declared that the report was not balanced. It was principally based on the evidence of neighbours which seemed to favour Siriram. Bishundial had petitioned the court to consider the gruesome nature of the offence and that the offender had not shown remorse.Convicted killer Vindra SiriramPersaud’s sister, Sherry-Ann, who witnessed the accused slapping her sister in front of others, testified before the court. Other witnesses, including the couple’s young daughter, testified that Siriram and Persaud would often fight.The pathologist testified that there were marks of violence about the body and signs of compression as if someone forced the woman down. The post-mortem examination revealed that she died as a result of drowning and manual strangulation.However, the convicted man previously told the court that he loved his wife and also wanted to know who killed her, claiming that he was beaten by the Police. In addition, he stated that a garbage bag was placed over his head and he was forced to sign a caution statement.Siriram claimed that in fact, on the morning of June 10, 2014 he woke up and found his wife in that position and immediately called out to a neighbour. He maintained this story after he was sentenced.Siriram was initially indicted for murder, but a jury (10-2) found him guilty of manslaughter early last month. Persaud, who had known Siriram since she was a teenager, was said to have dropped out of school during the relationship.last_img read more

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Calling the Transformer

first_imgBecause in the past few decades of Los Angeles Unified School District history, slashing bureaucracy has never been the board’s preferred way to free up cash. Traditionally, when the school board needs to find money, it’s the kids who pay through slashed art and music programs, inadequate supplies and textbooks, or perpetually uncleaned bathrooms. But the bureaucracy has remained sacred. So it’s nice to see Brewer break with convention and promise to go after the fat instead. Now he needs to deliver. Prudence suggests that the LAUSD ought to have found the money before committing to a new contract, but prudence sometimes yields to political reality. And now the district is starting at a $200 million budget gap. In short order, Brewer is going to need to come up with the funds, and without robbing the traditional targets. He will need to show the public exactly where the savings are being achieved – how many bureaucrats are being relieved or returned to the classroom; where operations are being streamlined; and how the downtown apparatus is being made more efficient. A former Navy admiral, Brewer has said repeatedly that more accountability is needed in the district. And now he will be singularly accountable for wringing the promised savings from the LAUSD bureaucracy. Meanwhile, L.A. teachers are getting a handsome raise, with more likely to come in a year, when the contract must be renegotiated. The deal also includes some modest reduction in class sizes. Paying teachers better, we’ve long been told, begets better teachers and, in turn, better schools. Ditto for smaller classes. On these fronts, Brewer will also be held accountable for whether the investment lives up to the promise. Paying more for better teachers and smaller classes is well worth it – especially if the money is only coming out of the bureaucracy – provided that the result is better education overall. But the proof is in the results: higher test scores, lower dropout rates, more responsive schools and a smaller bureaucracy. These are the standards by which the superintendent will be judged. We’re looking forward to seeing the Transformer in action.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHEN Superintendent David Brewer III took the helm of the LAUSD in October, he boasted that he was not a reformer, but “a transformer.” Let’s hope he’s right, because if the district is going to pay for its whopping new teachers contract, he’s going to need to radically transform the way it does business, and fast. The 6 percent, one-year pay hike for teachers – coming, conveniently, just in time for United Teachers Los Angeles to make its hefty campaign contributions to incumbent school board members who face re-election in March – will cost the district $200 million more than it had budgeted. Not to worry, Brewer says. He and the board will find the money by taking a knife to the LAUSD’s bloated bureaucracy. And to do that, he’ll need to be a transformer, all right. last_img read more

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