Lukaku ruled out for “weeks”

first_img Manager Roberto Martinez has confirmed the Belgium international did not sustain a serious injury in the 4-0 defeat in Tuesday night’s Merseyside derby at Anfield. Lukaku was carried off on a stretcher after colliding with team-mate Gareth Barry as they tried to prevent Steven Gerrard scoring the first goal in the 21st minute. “There is no ligament damage and the injury is not as bad as we first thought,” Martinez told evertonfc.com. “It will be a case of weeks rather than months.” Lukaku has scored nine goals in 20 appearances since joining on loan from Chelsea in the summer. He joins the likes of Bryan Oviedo (broken leg), Arouna Kone and Darron Gibson (both knee) and Seamus Coleman and Sylvain Distin (both hamstring) on the injury list. Everton will contact Liverpool after a number of concerns were highlighted by visiting fans about access problems to Anfield. “We are aware of a significant number of complaints regarding queue management from supporters waiting to enter Anfield at last night’s derby match,” said director of communications Alan Myers. “The club will make contact with Liverpool Football Club to raise these matters.” Press Associationcenter_img Everton striker Romelu Lukaku is likely to be out for “weeks rather than months” with an ankle injury.last_img read more

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Update on the latest sports

first_img— The Tampa Bay Lightning closed their facilities Thursday after five team employees tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a person with knowledge of the situation. The person tells The Associated Press the team and the NHL haven’t announced the closure. The NHL is also no longer announcing which teams individual players tested positive. The developments come some two weeks after players were allowed to return to their respective facilities to take part in voluntary on- and off-ice workouts.— Canada has approved a National Hockey League plan to play in Canada amid the coronavirus pandemic. The plan required an exemption as the U.S.-Canada border is currently closed to all non-essential travel until at least July 21 and those who enter Canada must self-isolate for 14 days. The league plans to have training camps open in July and to play games without spectators in a couple of cities in late July or August. Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland says Canada’s top public health officer as well as the top health officers of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Toronto worked closely with the NHL to approve the plan.— Japanese baseball has managed to do what American baseball has not: play ball. The world’s second-most famous league has opened a season that will be shortened from its regular 143 games to 120. That’s twice as many MLB figures to play. The regular season is to end on Nov. 7 and be followed by post-season play. The start of the season was delayed for three months by the coronavirus pandemic. All 12 teams were scheduled to begin play in stadiums without fans. Two games were in open-air stadiums in Tokyo and Yokohama. The other four were in domed facilities in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka and Saitama prefecture.— A person with knowledge of the decision tells The Associated Press that Albert Pujols (POO’-hohlz) will pay the salaries of the Los Angeles Angels’ furloughed employees in his native Dominican Republic for five months. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because Pujols didn’t publicly announce his commitment to pay roughly $180,000 to cover the salaries. The strict budget cuts made by Angels owner Arte Moreno during the coronavirus pandemic have included extensive furloughs for scouts, player development staff and minor league employees. The furloughs also included most of the staff of their Dominican academy in Boca Chica.AMERICA PROTESTS-SPORTS — The NCAA is expanding its policy banning states with prominent Confederate symbols from hosting its sponsored events. The current ban, in place since 2001, prevents states from hosting what the NCAA calls predetermined sites, such as men’s basketball tournament games. Mississippi is the only state currently affected by the policy. The expanded policy means that even when sites of games are determined by performance as they are in sports such as baseball and women’s basketball, Mississippi schools will not be permitted to host NCAA tournament games.NFL-NEWS49ers wide receiver Richie James Jr. breaks right wristUNDATED (AP) — San Francisco 49ers receiver Richie James Jr. has broken his right wrist during offseason workouts and won’t be ready to return to the field until after the start of training camp.The 49ers confirmed a report of the injury by NFL Network on Friday and said they will have a better idea of how long James will be sidelined after he reports to training camp next month. NFL Network said James is expected to miss at least two months. In other developments related to the national protests against racial injustice:— The agency that manages RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., removed a statue of George Preston Marshall, who moved the team from Boston to Washington. Marshall resisted integrating the team with black players until “forced to do so” in 1962, according to his biography on the Pro Football Hall of Fame website. Marshall was inducted into the Hall in 1963; he died in 1969. Events DC officials called the removal on Friday “a small and overdue step on the road to lasting equality and justice.” A Redskins spokesman did not immediately comment.— Former NFL quarterback and civil rights activist Colin Kaepernick is helping to fund the cost of legal representation for some protesters who were arrested during demonstrations in the days after George Floyd’s death. The Star Tribune reports that Kaepernick’s Know Your Rights Foundation has donated what’s described as a “substantial” sum to attorneys nationwide. Kaepernick is the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who took a knee in 2016 during the national anthem to protest police brutality. He started his Know Your Rights Camp Legal Defense Initiative amid widespread protests following Floyd’s death. The fund won’t say how much money has been raised.— Many teams from the major U.S. pro leagues stopped to commemorate Juneteenth — the celebration of what occurred June 19, 1865, the day that all enslaved black people in the U.S. learned they had been freed from bondage. The day carried particular importance this year, with teams recognizing the day as important enough to declare it a paid holiday for workers — acknowledging the problems the country is facing today after several weeks of protests demanding the elimination of police brutality and racial inequality.— A group of black Major League Soccer players has formed a coalition to address systematic racism in their communities and bring about change within the league. The coalition is the result of an Instagram group that began after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, which spawned a wave of nationwide protests against racism and policy brutality. Started by Toronto FC defender Justin Morrow, the group grew to some 70 MLS players, who decided to act and the Black Players Coalition of MLS was born.  Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditVIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTSPhillies close Florida camp after 5 players test positiveUNDATED (AP) — Five players for the Philadelphia Phillies have tested positive for COVID-19 at the team’s spring camp in Florida, prompting the club to indefinitely close the complex. The team also said Friday that three staff members at the camp have tested positive. The club didn’t identify any of those affected. Philadelphia has shut the camp in Clearwater, Florida, to players, coaches and staff while medical authorities assess the situation. Update on the latest sports The announcement came while Major League Baseball owners and players try to negotiate a deal to begin the season amid the coronavirus pandemic, including health protocols. Some players had been recently been working out at spring training sites while practicing social distancing.The sides had hoped to have players begin testing Tuesday and then begin a second round of spring training on June 26. Most teams would likely hold those workouts at their home ballparks, rather than at their spring camps in Florida and Arizona.In other developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic:— Five-time PGA Tour winner Nick Watney tested positive Friday for the coronavirus, the first player with a confirmed infection since golf resumed its schedule last week. Watney withdrew immediately withdrew from the RBC Heritage and must self-isolate for at least 10 days under the PGA Tour’s protocols. He did not return a telephone call seeking comment. Watney played the opening round with Vaughn Taylor and Luke List.— An unidentified San Francisco 49ers player has reportedly tested positive for COVID-19 after an informal workout with teammates in Tennessee. The NFL Network reported that one player who took part in the workouts this week in Nashville has tested positive. All the players who were there will now get tested to see if there is any spread. The team declined to comment, citing federal and state privacy laws about the personal health of employees.center_img Twins remove ex-owner Griffith statue over racist remarksUNDATED (AP) — The Minnesota Twins have removed a statue of former owner Calvin Griffith at Target Field, citing racist remarks he made in 1978.Griffith’s statue was one of several installed when the team opened its ballpark in 2010. Griffith moved the Washington Senators to Minnesota for the 1961 season, and the team was renamed the Twins. During a 1978 speech to a Waseca Lions club, Griffith said he decided to do make the move “when I found out you only had 15,000 blacks here.” The team says it “cannot remain silent and continue ignoring the racist comments he made in Waseca.”Spokesman Dustin Morse said the removal was an internal decision, but the team had “certainly heard from outside fans and the community over the years” about Griffith’s remarks.Griffith sold the Twins to banker Carl Pohlad in 1984. June 19, 2020 James is the second receiver lost to injury this week for the defending NFC champion 49ers. No. 1 wideout Deebo Samuel underwent surgery Thursday to repair a fracture in his left foot suffered during informal player workouts in Tennessee. Samuel said he expects to be back in 10 weeks, meaning his will miss the start of training camp but should be healthy for the season opener Sept. 13.In other NFL news:— The New York Jets have agreed to terms with Baylor wide receiver Denzel Mims, their second-round draft pick in April, according to a person with knowledge of the deal. Mims fits a major need for a Jets offense that lost its top wideout, Robby Anderson, to Carolina in free agency. Chosen 59th overall, Mims will get a four-year deal worth about $5.5 million. New York has signed only one of its 2020 draftees, fifth-round cornerback Bryce Hall of Virginia.— NFL Network and NFL RedZone went dark on DISH Network and Sling TV last night as both sides try to reach a new distribution agreement. The lack of an agreement impacts 11.32 million subscribers. DISH has 9.01 million and Sling TV accounts for another 2.31 million. The NFL is still deep into the offseason with preseason games not scheduled to begin for another two months. Associated Press last_img read more

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Storming of court losing significance

first_imgThere?s a saying in sports: act like you?ve been there. Purdue fans, take note.After watching the Badger basketball team get ?upset? by the Boilermakers 60-56 Saturday, I was just as surprised to see the students rush the court as I was by the final score.If history tells us anything, this home victory shouldn?t have come as much of a shock for Purdue. After all, Saturday marked the 31st time in 32 tries that UW walked out of Mackey Arena on the losing end, with their only win coming in 2005. Talk about domination.And it?s not as if this was a David-versus-Goliath matchup that would warrant the type of post-game celebration that we saw Saturday. The Badgers carried the No. 11 ranking into West Lafayette, but let?s be honest here: they just don?t have the look of a top 10 team. Without the big-game players like Alando Tucker and Kammron Taylor of last year?s squad, it?s tough to see them ever reaching the rankings they did in 2007.The Boilermakers, on the other hand, are now 15-5 and 6-1 in the Big Ten, exceeding many people?s preseason expectations. And they?re doing it without a real marquee name on their roster now that Carl Landry, brother of Wisconsin?s Marcus, is gone.Given their record, one could argue that Purdue?s victory over Wisconsin was a much needed ?r?sum? win,? much like the Badgers? upset of Texas was. But if you truly want to be among the conference elite, you have to act as if you belong there.When you storm the court, you clearly don?t.While I appreciate the love the ?Paint Crew? (aptly named after head coach Matt Painter) has for their Boilermakers, I completely disagree with their method of celebration Saturday.In my opinion, there are only a select number of instances where it is appropriate to jump from your seats and run out onto the middle of the court. Obviously, the aforementioned David slaying Goliath example holds true here. And by Goliath, I don?t mean the 11th-ranked team in the country and the third-best team in the conference.Last season, when the Badgers had the No. 2 ranking and a 17-game winning streak, they traveled to one of the most historic venues ? Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind. ? to take on the No. 25 Hoosiers. The winning streak came to a screeching halt when Indiana prevailed 71-66.Did this win merit a storming of the court? No. Granted, the Badgers were the second-best team in the country, but the Hoosiers were ranked too.When Kentucky ? a program that has struggled in recent years ? defeated No. 5 Tennessee last Tuesday, I was half-expecting the Wildcat faithful to rush the floor. Certainly, a win like this ? more of an upset than either of the Badger losses mentioned ? was worthy of such action.But they didn?t. As the players celebrated in jubilation at midcourt, the fans remained in their seats.The only other time it should be appropriate for students and fans to do what the Boilermakers did is if the win means something. For instance, when the Badgers clinched the Big Ten title at home in 2003, players were swarmed by adoring fans. Makes sense here, as they not only clinched the conference crown but it was also senior Kirk Penney?s last game at the Kohl Center.The same thing happened to Wisconsin on the road last season against Ohio State. The Buckeye fans rushed the floor after OSU’s victory earned them the Big Ten title.Moments like this are good cause for celebration, but they don’t come along often for any team.I guess you could consider it somewhat of an honor when the opposing team?s fans rush the court after they beat you. It means you?re a team everyone wants to be (and beat). If the fans are ho-hum after a victory over you, it probably means you?re just not that good.When Purdue comes to the Kohl Center Feb. 9 for a rematch, I can guarantee you none of the Grateful Red will rush the court if and when the Badgers avenge their loss.We?ve been there before.Tyler is a junior majoring in journalism. If you?ve ever stormed the court or field after a win, let him know your reasoning at tmason@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

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