Duo Arrested Following Traffic Stop

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.CHAUTAUQUA – Two people were arrested last week following a traffic stop in the Town of Chautauqua.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says Martha Wheeler, 43, of Clymer, was pulled over on Route 430 last Saturday night for an alleged traffic violation.Through investigation, deputies allege Wheeler was operating the vehicle in an intoxicated state.While deputies were performing standardized field sobriety tests on Wheeler, the vehicle’s passenger, Mark Griswold, 58, of Clymer, reportedly got out of the vehicle and confronted deputies. Wheeler was taken into custody and charged with driving while intoxicated per se, driving while intoxicated common law, and inadequate head lamps.Deputies say Griswold followed them to the Sheriff’s Office where he tried to enter the facility.He was additionally arrested and charged with second-degree obstructing governmental administration.Both were released with appearance tickets for the Town of Chautauqua Court.last_img read more

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Back-line depth provides stability for tough Syracuse defense

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 23, 2014 at 12:17 am Contact Josh: jmhyber@syr.edu With Syracuse holding onto a one-goal lead with 10 minutes left against Clemson last Saturday night, Chris Makowski came on for just his third appearance of the season.“Clemson, on the road, holding on to a 1-0 lead with three ACC points on the line,” head coach Ian McIntyre said, “that just demonstrates how much faith we have in these guys.”After securing what the coach called a “gutsy” 1-0 victory over the Tigers, Syracuse’s (6-1, 1-1 Atlantic Coast) defensive stamina and depth will again be put to the test Tuesday at 7 p.m. when the team returns to action against Binghamton (2-5) at the Bearcats Sports Complex. While Syracuse’s defensive starters receive praise for SU’s six shutouts in seven games, McIntyre has also been able to play reserves in key minutes.Shortly after the team returned to its South Carolina hotel on Saturday, Thomas and fellow defender Tyler Hilliard immediately went for a swim in the hotel pool. The two have played a combined 700 minutes this season and in the same sequence earlier in the day, each had a brief hamstring issue.“To have guys like that that can come off the bench when we start to cramp in hot weather or when we get a red card, it’s huge for us,” goalkeeper Alex Bono said.Bono receives credit for the team’s shutout along with the team’s new-look, three-man defense of Thomas, Hilliard and Jordan Murrell. Bono’s 3.17 saves per game ranks tied for 142nd nationally, while SU’s .14 goals allowed per game average is third in the country.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBono and McIntyre stress that shutouts come from a group effort and Makowski and Louis Cross, who started three of the six matches he’s played this season, are hardly benchwarmers.With Thomas suspended for SU’s season-opener against Niagara after getting a red card in last year’s finale, Cross stepped in and scored the team’s first goal of the season. With Thomas suspended for receiving another red card, Cross again started in a shutout victory against Cornell.“For me to be considered part of this defense is really pleasing because we’ve got such good depth,” said Cross, who started 13 of 17 games at Akron last year.Makowski, a team co-captain last year, led SU field players in minutes played in 2012 and 2013. As a sophomore in 2012, he was the team MVP.“I have no hesitation whatsoever to put him in,” McIntyre said.The back line doesn’t include sophomore outside midfielder Oyvind Alseth, who as a freshman started all 18 matches at right back for the Orange, and redshirt junior Brandon Albert, who started nine and played in 14 matches last year.Only Syracuse, Penn State and George Mason have allowed just one goal in seven games.With a stout performance against Binghamton, the Orange will maintain its momentum heading into a home match against No. 7 Virginia on Saturday night.“Binghamton is always a very difficult game, another one of these regional matchups,” McIntyre said. “They’re a hard-working team that we know it will be important for us to play at our best.“To go back on the road so quickly, it will be important for us to show that character and our energy.” Commentslast_img read more

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Susan O’Leary – Alderney – Esports challenge accepted

first_img Susan O’Leary, AlderneySusan O’Leary, CEO at Alderney Gambling, says Esports betting throws up major regulatory challenges, but the industry needs to take them on to safeguard its future.Esports has come a long way in a short space of time. From a small number of hardcore enthusiasts duking it out from their parent’s basements to professional teams going head-to-head in front of capacity crowds at the world’s largest entertainment arenas, Esports is now a global institution.Last year, the Esports sector generated revenues in excess of $890 million according to SuperData Research, with viewership figures smashing the 210 million mark. Those figures are expected to rise to $1.5 billion and 600 million respectively by the end of the decade, according to Newzoo.Esports’ rapid rise from niche interest to blockbuster franchise has, naturally, seen it intersect with the gambling industry. Like other sporting activities, fans want to bet on their favourite players, teams and the outcomes of contests, allowing them to engage on a higher level while adding additional value to their experience.The speed at which Esports has arrived on the scene has left the gambling industry gasping for breath, however. Operators have moved quickly to offer their customers markets on all the major contests, but the sector has also created a new type of wager known as skin bets, which account for most Esports gambling revenue.Skin bets see players stake virtual goods such as swords, shields, costumes, etc from the games. Eilers & Krejcik Gaming estimate the market to have been worth $5.1bn in 2016 while cash betting was a fraction of that at $750m. It’s a big business, and one that looks set to continue growing over the coming months and years.There is a dark side to Esports wagering – particularly skin betting and to a lesser extent cash bets. The sector has been, and remains, unregulated. This means the whole industry, especially those operating betting businesses, are exposed to major scandals that could have catastrophic long-term consequences.The most serious of which is underage gambling. It must be remembered that Esports is hugely popular among millennials – those aged between 18 and 32 – and it would be naïve to think those aged 17 and younger are not also playing games and wagering on the outcomes of contest through skin bets.The sector is crying out for regulation. Not only to protect punters, but also the integrity of professional players, contests, leagues, tournaments and the operators, suppliers and service providers plying their trade in the market.The sector needs to move fast if it is to safeguard itself from a potential crisis; all stakeholders – from streaming services to bookmakers, governments to internationally recognised regulators – need to come together and thrash out a battle plan that facilitates ongoing industry growth, but that is also secure and sustainable.Esports presents a number of unique challenges; skin betting is a new phenomenon those providing oversight need to learn more about, the industry is absolutely global and not bound by borders, new and exciting betting platforms are being introduced all the time and currencies are sometimes virtual, sometimes real, and often both.It requires collaboration; regulators and governments need to listen to tech providers to learn what products they offer, how they work, and where they are exposed to manipulation. Operators and suppliers must understand the need to protect players and be compliant with internationally-recognised gold standards.While the regulators such as the Alderney Gambling Control Commission will license bookmakers offering odds on Esports, they won’t regulate the industry itself. To do this, the sector needs to establish its own governing body to provide guidelines and oversight.For bookmakers, it will give them the confidence to offer greater odds and more adventurous markets. It will provide a fairness gauge against which to offset their risk, and ensure match-fixing issues are recognised and handled appropriately.It is time to bring the dark side of Esports into the light. Lessons should be learned from daily fantasy sports and the DraftKings data leak scandal that kick-started a regulatory revolution. If the Esports industry acts now it can circumvent scandal and lay the foundation for a long and prosperous future.It is a hugely innovative, massively exciting, technologically ground-breaking industry that should be cheered and celebrated. It also needs to take responsibility to ensure those betting on contests are properly protected, and that the foundations it has built over recent years stand strong in the future. StumbleUpon GG.Bet scores ESL Counter-Strike & Dota 2 global partnerships July 15, 2020 Related Articles Luckbox: How the return of live sport has affected esports betting July 10, 2020 Share Winning Post: UK racing must put its best foot forward … July 20, 2020 Share Submitlast_img read more

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