Lack of Logistics Hampers LNRCS Operations

first_imgThe president of the Liberia National Red Cross Society (LNRCS) says logistical support remains a serious challenge to the Red Cross intervention to help stop further spread of the deadly Ebola virus.According to Mr. Emmanuel Kparh, vehicles, fuel and funding are some of the essential logistics needed to enhance the institutional capacity in the fight against Ebola.The LNRCS is the major organization clothed with the authority to provide humanitarian assistance as well as disaster management in the country.Mr. Kparh spoke Tuesday when the management of National Petroleum (NP) Liberia Limited donated 200-gallons of fuel to the Liberia National Red Cross Society in support of its Ebola intervention.The NP management said that the donation was its little way of buttressing government efforts through the LNRCS to contain the Ebola virus in the country and the Sub-Region. NP is a Sierra Leonean petroleum company. Sierra Leone is one of three countries in the region that is suffering the wrath of the virus.The LRC president thanked  the NP for the fuel donation, describing it as timely to help maximize the Red Cross’ output in its Ebola response activities in the affected counties.The LNRC’s current Ebola response activities are being supported by its movement partners but Mr. Kparh wants other national and international institutions as well to support the Liberian Red Cross as it intensifies efforts to help contain the Ebola virus.The Red Cross is carrying out social mobilization and awareness, contact tracing, psychosocial counseling and providing survivor kits to victims in the seven counties.  It is also now assisting the Ministry of Health in the area of dead body management of Ebola victims for Montserrado only.The LNRC has already declared August as Ebola Month after scaling down activities of other programs and projects to concentrate more on fighting the deadly Ebola Virus in Liberia.LNRC secretary general Fayiah Tamba recently told the media that as an auxiliary to government, the LNRC was prepared and ready for the Month of August to utilize every resource at its disposal to fight the disease in support of the government efforts.The Ebola virus, since its outbreak in the region, has claimed over one thousand lives with Guinea, where it originated from, being the hardest hit follow by Sierra Leone and Liberia.President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf described the outbreak in the country as a national tragedy that needs to be brought to an end. She has imposed a 90- day state of emergency which she believes will help contain the virus.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Fort St. John health care crisis: ‘We also need to work smarter and better,’ say President for Doctors of B.C.

first_img“I learned that the north is a big place, and providing care in rural and remote areas is more complicated than I as an urban physician have given credit for,” Dr. Cavers said. “My own minor experiences in driving these huge distances with the weather; it really highlights the difficulties that the patients have accessing care and the doctors have in providing it.”Dr. Cavers adds, “We don’t have enough doctors in the rural areas; we don’t have enough nurses in the rural areas. There’s a real health human resources issue going on in B.C. right now.”Doctors of B.C. estimate the need to produce 450 new graduates per year, which at this point is only at 288 per year.- Advertisement -“We need to be able to attract more of our own graduates into rural areas and keep more of our graduates within British Columbia.”Dr. Carvers goes on to say while this issue is not unique to B.C, let alone just Fort St. John, it’s an issue that’s been “front and centre” during the organization’s meetings – a particular interest in creating a “made in B.C.” solution.“We also need to work smarter and better – we have to sort out ways where the physicians can provide care more easily and more efficiently so that they can expand their umbrella of care to cover more people,” Dr. Carver explained.Advertisement Dr. Carver concludes by saying the doctors within a community experiences a physician shortage are imperative in creating a solution.“A lot of physicians feel somewhat disconnected from the health authorities and the way the health authorities make decisions in terms of resource allocation, organization of health authority, work flows, etc.”Dr. Caver does however concede that these conversations have already, and continue to be held between heath authorities, the Ministry of Health, and Doctors of B.C.“We know the physicians have a unique perspective; they’re on the front lines of care, they know what can work and make a positive difference, and they have very good ideas and deserve to be heard.” Enter telemedicine; which Dr. Carver asserts to have the ability of working “for good or for evil.”“We can use telephone medicine for a whole bunch of follow-up care so that patients don’t have to worry about mobility or travelling problems, and physicians can ‘see them’ in a much more efficient manner,” Dr. Caver says he concluded after experiencing the drive from Dawson Creek to Fort St. John.Dr. Carver adds, “If telemedicine is brought in without any constraints, there’s a risk of creating a whole generation of ‘don’t even bother to walk-in’ clinics; in which people will phone in to talk to a physician for what I would call some relatively minor issues, and if the advise they’re given is unconnected to any longitudinal care – it can prove to be expensive and fragmented way of getting care.”Dr Carver says this can increase the risk to patients, reduce positive outcomes, and push up the per capita cost.Advertisementlast_img read more

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