Investigation launched into Paris-Roubaix rider’s death

first_imgJiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina FILE – In this Thursday, April 5, 2018 file photo a cyclist trains ahead of Sunday’s 116th edition of the Paris-Roubaix cycling classic, in Haveluy, northern France. Belgian rider Michael Goolaerts died of cardiac arrest after collapsing while competing in the Paris-Roubaix race on Sunday April 8. Goolaerts’ team said the 23-year-old died in a Lille hospital where he had been taken by helicopter from the one-day classic. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)PARIS — French judicial officials launched an investigation Monday into the death of Belgian rider Michael Goolaerts during the Paris-Roubaix cycling race.Goolaerts died Sunday after collapsing during the one-day classic on cobblestones in northern France.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next READ: Belgian cyclist dies in Paris-Roubaix raceCambrai prosecutor Remi Schwartz told The Associated Press that an autopsy will be performed on Goolaerts’ body in the coming days to determine the exact cause of death.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownThe 23-year-old Belgian died at a hospital in Lille, where he had been taken by helicopter from the race. Organizers said in a medical statement that he suffered a cardio-respiratory arrest.Goolaerts had been airlifted to the hospital after collapsing about 150 kilometers (93 miles) from the finish in the second of the 29 cobblestone sectors of the race known as “The Hell of the North.” No images of the incident were available but TV footage of the race showed Goolaerts lying unresponsive on the side of the road as the peloton passed him. He was then attended to by a medical team and appeared to receive CPR. Ferrari mechanic hit by Raikkonen says he’s OK after surgery Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident According to Schwartz, early investigation results indicate that Goolaerts might have fallen off his bike because of a cardiac episode, and that it was not the crash that led to his death.“But at this stage we don’t have any absolute certainty,” he said. “There is no obvious explanation, nor an obvious traumatism as the cause (of his death).”Goolaerts was in his fourth year with the Veranda’s Willems-Crelan team. He rode in support of cyclo-cross world champion Wout van Aert of Belgium at Paris-Roubaix. His most significant result this season was 20th at Kuurne-Brussels-Kuurne.Goolaerts’ death came two years after Belgian cyclist Daan Myngheer died following a heart attack during the Criterium International race in Corsica. Another Belgian cyclist, Antoine Demoitie, died the same year following a crash in the Gent-Wevelgem race.ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil MOST READ Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew LATEST STORIES Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feast View commentslast_img read more

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Minister expresses condolences to family after ambulance debacle

first_imgMinister Regina Doherty has expressed condolences in the Dáil to the family of a Letterkenny who died after it took an ambulance 71 minutes to reach her home just 2km away.An inquest at Letterkenny Coroner’s Court yesterday heard that mother-of-eight Margaret Callaghan died in the early hours of January 9, 2018 after waiting for an ambulance at Mountain Top.The coroner hearing the inquest called on the HSE to review their protocols for ambulance turnaround times at hospitals across the country following the tragedy. In the Dáil, Ms Doherty admitted that an increase in the number of patients attending emergency departments has in turn put extra strain on ambulance services.However, Fianna Fáil deputy leader, Dara Calleary, said that blaming increases in patient numbers shows a “complete disconnect between the Government and what’s happening in hospitals”.He said: “The difficulties in our emergency departments are nothing to do with people getting sick and presenting to emergency departments — they are to do with the fact that there were 300 or fewer staff nurses employed in our system in October compared to last December. There’s 350 consultant vacancies.”Mr Calleary said 20 extra beds were promised for Letterkenny University Hospital but only 10 have opened. “That is where the difficulties are — our emergency departments are under-resourced, are understaffed, nursing resources and consulting resources that are absolutely necessary are not in place.”Ms Doherty expressed her condolences to the family and told the Dáil that she hopes no other family has to go through a similar tragedy:“I can’t genuinely begin to probably understand or appreciate how difficult it will be for them to get over her death given that it potentially shouldn’t have happened.”She added: “It’s the case that when the emergency care hospital system is under pressure, there’s going to the potential for delays in the transfer patients from an ambulance into our emergency departments.”She said ambulance turnaround times are currently below target. ‘We cannot say exactly where it is going to end up’ – Chairman on children’s hospital costsBetween January and October this year, 85.5% of ambulances achieved a turnaround time 60 minutes or less, which is below the target of 95%.Ms Doherty told the Dáil that in the first 10 months of 2019, the numbers of patients attending hospital emergency departments increased by 2.7% across the country and the number of emergency department admissions increased by 1% compared to the same period last year.“But I do understand that the trolley numbers at 8am in Letterkenny University Hospital have been persistently high for this entire year,” said Ms Doherty. Minister expresses condolences to family after ambulance debacle was last modified: December 6th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:ambulancedaildonegalhospitalMargaret CallaghanMinisteroffload delayslast_img read more

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How to choose the right workout drink?

first_imgIt’s one of those high energy days. You decide to prolong your workout, jog five km instead of the three you normally do before calling it a day. You are bathed in sweat and need a cool yet nutritional drink to supplement your effort on the rubber. But the moment you start considering your choices, you are stuck.While good old banana shake beckons, you remember reading a scientific study about low fat chocolate milk being the ideal post workout drink. Then you recall your personal trainer’s lecture on the benefits of whey milk. But wait a minute.Click here to EnlargeShouldn’t you replenish the minerals lost with sweat through an electrolyte-based drink? We help you sift though these options and make the right choice.When you exercise, your muscles break down to take a bigger and stronger form and sweat makes you lose body fluid.Workout drinks help replenish the energy levels and keep you going. While proteinrich drinks focus on building better muscles, electrolyte-based drinks provide the essential minerals lost in sweat. Deciding what you need is essential.Check your hydration levelsTypically, you are required to drink two cups of water before, during, and after a workout to maintain level of body fluid.This may vary depending upon various factors including the length and intensity of your workout. A good way to check your hydration levels can be monitoring the urine output. Light coloured, diluted urine indicates good hydration levels while dark coloured, concentrated urine points towards dehydration. Also, keep a check on the weight lost before and post workout.advertisementStudies have found that athletes who lose as little as two per cent of their body weight through sweating experience a drop in blood volume which causes the heart to work harder to circulate blood, leading to muscle cramps, dizziness, fatigue and heat stroke. However, be cautious not to overdo hydration as this can lead to hypernatremia, a condition which occurs due to excessive water intake and low sodium levels in the blood. Drink around two cups of water for every 450 gm lost.Sweating causes a loss of electrolyte such as calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium and potassium which are essential for normal body functioning. Though intense training in the heat will cause a depletion of minerals, training in a cool room won’t cause much electrolyte loss.Chocolate milk is idealChocolate milk is an ideal post-exercise drink, say two recent studies done at the University of Texas. Researchers found that athletes who drank this put on more muscle and less fat, recorded better timing while working out and were in better physical shape than peers who consumed sports drinks that just contained carbohydrates and calorie-free health drinks. Cyclists exhibited more power and reduced their ride time by an average of six minutes when they consumed low-fat chocolate milk. They were also found to have twice the improvement in endurance, built more muscle and reduced fat compared to others.”You can’t depend upon just carbs or just proteins to replenish the body which is why having zero carbs protein supplement or having only high carb drink is not a good idea. Better go for ideal mix of the two,” says Snehswaran Reddy, HOD, physical education, Gems International. However, chocolate milk only provides calcium and sodium – just two of the four major electrolyte lost in sweat. But, as explained earlier, you are not going to miss them much because your body is not depleted of these minerals during regular workout routines. Only if you find yourself exercising in extreme conditions over long hours, sports drink with a good electrolyte balance can be an ideal option.Whey-based drinkMilk contains two primary proteins: casein and whey. Whey has about about 20 per cent of milk proteins and is a natural by-product of the cheesemaking process. Earlier, this liquid was discarded but today it’s a major ingredient of protein supplements used by iron-pumping body builders across the world. Besides whey protein powders, whey-based beverages are also being marketed as workout drinks. These offer a combination of electrolyte, making them a cross between protein drinks and waterbased sports drinks.However, whey is high on lactose so anyone with lactose intolerance can’t consume it. The carb to protein ratio in whey greatly skewed at 16: 1, so it can be termed more as an energy booster with electrolyte than a muscle-building drink.Chocolate milk: Regular vs low fatScientists believe there is something in naturally occurring combination of carbs and protein that makes chocolate milk a mighty potion. However, low fat chocolate milk does not contain the ideal carb to protein ratio of 4: 1 which is needed to replenish glycogen stores and to stimulate muscle growth.advertisementOn the other hand, regular chocolate milk fulfils this criterion – one cup contains 226 calories, 31.7 g carbs and 8.6 g protein. It also contains 154 mg sodium, 1.1 g dietary fibre and helps meet 25 per cent of your daily calcium need.Pick a sports drink with low carbsIf you are exercising at a high intensity for 60 minutes or more, grab a sports drink with electrolyte. However, make sure that the drink doesn’t contain more than 8 per cent of carbs as high amounts of carbs can cause slow absorption, nausea, cramps or diarrhoea. But a drink with 5 per cent or less sugar solution may not provide enough energy to help you go on for longer period of time. “Electral contains much wider range of minerals lost in sweat than any other sports drink available in the market,” says Sanjay Arora, a seasoned marathon runner.last_img read more

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