9 days ago​Liverpool hero Hamann: I wanted to join Arsenal

first_img​Liverpool hero Hamann: I wanted to join Arsenalby Ansser Sadiq9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool legend Dietmar Hamann has admitted that he wanted to join Arsenal instead of the Reds!The German defensive midfielder played over 200 games for the club in the early 2000s.But when he left Newcastle in 1999, Hamann has revealed that his first choice was to go to Arsenal under Arsene Wenger.It is understandable, given the Gunners were competing for Premier League titles in those years.However, Hamann told The Athletic that he never got any serious interest from Arsenal, which meant that Liverpool was his best option for a step up from Newcastle.He signed for the club in an £8 million deal under Gerard Houiller and became a mainstay in the team for the next seven years. About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Mississippi State Releases Awesome “Relentless” Hype Video

first_imgA Mississippi State player scores a touchdown over an LSU defender.Mississippi State Hype VideoMississippi State suffered a tough loss to Georgia Tech in last year’s Orange Bowl, but all in all, the Bulldogs had a great season. MSU opened the 2014 campaign with nine straight victories, including wins over LSU, Auburn and Arkansas, before falling in a close contest to Alabama. The Bulldogs, in early November, were the No. 1 ranked team in the country. And they posted double-digit victories for just the second time in their program’s history.The 2015 Bulldogs aren’t being picked by many to be quite as successful, but with star quarterback Dak Prescott returning, they may surprise a few people. Thursday, the school released an awesome hype video titled “Relentless” to tease the 2015 campaign. Enjoy, MSU fans:last_img

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Bill proposes reference to rights of Indigenous Peoples in citizenship oath

first_imgThe Canadian PressImmigration Minister Ahmed Hussen has introduced a bill that would change Canada’s oath of citizenship to include a reference to the rights of Indigenous Peoples.The Liberal government says the proposal demonstrates its commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and a renewed relationship based on the recognition of rights, respect and co-operation.Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett says the change demonstrates to all Canadians, including the country’s newest citizens, that Indigenous and Treaty Rights are an essential part of the country’s character.The bill contains new language for the oath that includes a pledge for new citizens to faithfully observe the laws of Canada including the Constitution, which “recognizes and affirms the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights of First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples.”The proposed change is also part of the Liberal government’s response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which spent six years probing Canada’s residential-school legacy before it issued 94 calls for action.Sen. Murray Sinclair, who chaired the commission, says he welcomes the government’s legislation to change the oath, saying it reflects a “more inclusive history of Canada.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Study reveals another surgical option for patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 18 2019The arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) surgical technique offers patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears restored shoulder function and the opportunity to return to sports and physically-demanding work, according to research presented today at the AOSSM/AANA Specialty Day in Las Vegas, Nevada. The study, which examined patient outcomes up to five years after surgery, built upon earlier research which examined short-term patient results.”We studied 30 patients who were treated with arthroscopic SCR, and consistently saw improvements in outcomes related to shoulder function and the daily lives of those treated,” noted lead researcher Teruhisa Mihata, MD, PhD, from Osaka Medical College in Osaka, Japan. “The technique allowed 11 of 12 patients who had previously worked to return full-time at five-year follow-up, and all eight who had participated in sports to return to play.”Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyPenn Medicine and Grand View Health partner to provide advanced orthopedic careTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’The study measured both American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores in patients, which improved significantly at both one and five years after surgery. The average ASES scores rose from 29.0 before surgery to 83.0 at one year and 92.3 at five years after surgery, with JOA scores rising from 51.5 before surgery to 85.9 and 91.4, respectively. Active elevation increased from 85 degrees prior to surgery to 151 degrees 5 years after the operation. Out of 30 patients followed for five years, only three (10%) experienced graft tears. Those who demonstrated graft healing also showed no sign of glenohumeral osteoarthritis during the five-year period.”Our latest research shows continued promise for the arthroscopic SCR technique, particularly to restore a patient’s shoulder function and allow them to return to work or sports if they so choose,” said Mihata. “We plan to continue studying longer-term outcomes for patients, focusing on continued function and the appearance of osteoarthritis.” Source:https://www.sportsmed.org/aossmimis/Members/About/Press_Releases/2019-Specialty-Day/Treating-Irreparable-Rotator-Cuffs-Injuries.aspxlast_img read more

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Topical cream found to be effective in reversing the effects of vitiligo

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 17 2019A nationwide phase II clinical trial, coordinated out of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, has found that a topical cream was extremely effective in reversing the effects of vitiligo, a relatively common autoimmune disease that causes loss of skin pigmentation.Topical application of the medicated cream, ruxolitinib, which is currently used as an oral treatment for certain blood disorders, resulted in substantial improvement of facial vitiligo symptoms in nearly half of the trial’s participants. Results of the clinical trial were presented by David Rosmarin, MD, Dermatologist at Tufts Medical Center and Primary Investigator for the study, on Saturday, June 15, at the World Congress of Dermatology in Milan, Italy.There is no known cause of vitiligo, a disease in which the immune system attacks pigment cells in the body. Vitiligo may range from mild to severe and can be found anywhere on the body, although it typically affects exposed areas, such as the face and hands. While vitiligo is not evident at birth, about half of vitiligo patients contract the disease before age 20. Approximately 50 million people – one percent of the worldwide population – are affected by vitiligo, including musical artist Michael Jackson, actor John Hamm, model Winnie Harlow and comedian Steve Martin. Vitiligo affects all ethnic groups equally, but is more evident in ethnic minorities with darker skin. No FDA-approved re-pigmenting treatments for vitiligo currently exist. Related StoriesNew e-tattoo beats conventional methods at monitoring heart healthScientists develop accurate, wearable voice recognition deviceNew ‘virtual biopsy’ device developed to detect skin tumorsThe two-year study, the largest randomized controlled vitiligo study ever conducted, enrolled 157 patients at 30 sites across the United States. Participants received daily or twice daily topical application of either ruxolitinib or placebo to the area of skin affected by vitiligo. About half of the highest dose of ruxolitinib patients saw a statistically significant improvement of near 50 percent in their facial vitiligo, compared to three percent who saw this level of improvement in the placebo group. Side effects of topical application of ruxolitinib were mild and included redness and irritation at the application site and mild acne.”Topical ruxolitinib has the potential to change the way vitiligo is treated. Not only is it effective at repigmenting the skin, but it has an excellent safety profile,” said Dr. Rosmarin. “We also are optimistic that many vitiligo patients may see an even better response with continuous ruxolitinib usage over an extended period of time, combined with phototherapy and sunlight exposure. Our hope is that this treatment ultimately will be a game-changer for the millions of people worldwide affected by vitiligo.” Source:Tufts Medical Center Unfortunately, there is often a social stigma associated with vitiligo, and it can take a significant psychosocial toll on patients. Current treatments such as phototherapy, topical corticosteroids, and calcineurin inhibitors have limited efficacy, and phototherapy treatment can be a burden for patients to have to use a light box two or three times per week.”David Rosmarin, MDlast_img read more

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Canada Apple back development of carbonfree aluminum smelting tech

Canada and Quebec province, as well as tech giant Apple, announced Thursday their backing of aluminum producers Alcoa and Rio Tinto’s new joint venture to develop a carbon-free smelting process. Citation: Canada, Apple back development of carbon-free aluminum smelting tech (2018, May 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-canada-apple-carbon-free-aluminum-smelting.html © 2018 AFP Aluminum is used in everything from cars and planes, softdrink cans, foil and window frames, as well as in Apple smartphones, tablets and computers Toyota invests Can$1.4 billion in Canada plants This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement with executives of the three companies on hand.Apple is investing Can$13 million (US$10 million) in the joint venture, and will provide technical support.Rio and Alcoa are investing Can$55 million (US$43 million), while the Canadian and Quebec governments will each invest Can$60 million (US$47 million) in a first round of financing.The technology promises to be “the most significant innovation in the aluminum industry in more than a century, and marks a decisive step forward in the fight against climate change,” said a statement.”Once fully developed and implemented, the ground-breaking technology will virtually eliminate the Canadian aluminum industry’s carbon footprint.”Aluminum is used in everything from cars and planes, softdrink cans, foil and window frames, as well as in Apple smartphones, tablets and computers.The sector employs 10,500 people in Canada.Alcoa is the largest aluminum producer in the United States and Rio is the world’s second-largest miner.Their joint venture is to be named Elysis and headed by Rio executive Vincent Christ. It will be based in Montreal, with a research facility in Quebec’s Saguenay region.The new technology is expected to be ready for licensing to retrofit smelters or build new facilities by 2024.According to Ottawa, it has the potential to reduce annual greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 6.5 million metric tonnes in Canada—the equivalent of taking 1.8 million cars off the road.”We are proud to be part of this ambitious new project, and look forward to one day being able to use aluminum produced without direct greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacturing of our products,” Apple chief executive Tim Cook said in the statement. Explore further read more

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Lowcost moon mission puts India among lunar pioneers

first_imgThe Chandrayaan-2 that is set to blast off from a tropical island off Andhra Pradesh state after a decade-long build-up. Metro News 09 Jul 2019 Space party to celebrate Apollo 11 moon mission Related News India 13 Jun 2019 India unveils spacecraft for second moon mission Related Newscenter_img World 11 Jul 2019 NASA shake up in new race to the moon SRIHARIKOTA, India (AFP): India will step up the international space race on Monday (July 15) when it launches a low-cost mission to become only the fourth country to land a probe on the moon.Just five days before the 50th anniversary of man’s first lunar landing, Chandrayaan-2 – or Moon Chariot 2 – will blast off from a tropical island off Andhra Pradesh state after a decade-long build-up.The mission will also highlight how far space travel has advanced since Neil Armstrong’s giant leap for mankind during the Apollo 11 mission.India has spent about US$140 million (S$190 million) to get Chandrayaan-2 ready for the 384,400 kilometres trip from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre to the scheduled landing on the lunar South Pole on Sept 6. AdChoices广告The United States spent about US$25 billion – the equivalent of more than US$100 billion in current prices – on 15 Apollo missions, including the six that put Armstrong and other astronauts on the moon.China landed its Chang’e 4 lunar craft in January, and spent US$8.4 billion on its entire space programme in 2017, according to international Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development figures.And Russia – the first country to land an unmanned moon rocket in 1966 – spent more than US$20 billion at today’s values on lunar missions in the 1960s and 70s.SPICED-UP SPACE RACEAlmost the entire Chandrayaan-2’s orbiter, lander and rover have been designed and made in India.India will use its most powerful rocket launcher, GSLV Mk III, to carry the 2.4 tonne orbiter, which has a mission life of about a year.The spacecraft will carry the 1.4 tonne lander Vikram – which in turn will take the 27-kilogramme rover Pragyan – to a high plain between two craters on the lunar South Pole.Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chief K. Sivan said Vikram’s 15-minute final descent “will be the most terrifying moments as we have never undertaken such a complex mission”.The solar-powered rover can travel up to 500 metres and is expected to work for one lunar day, the equivalent of 14 Earth days.Sivan said the probe will be looking for signs of water and “a fossil record of the early solar system”.Despite the relatively small budget, the mission does raise questions about how funds are allocated when the country is still battling hunger and poverty.But national pride is at stake: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has vowed to send a manned mission into orbit by 2022.Most experts say the geo-strategic stakes are small – but that India’s low-cost model could win commercial satellite and orbiting deals.”The fundamental question that we should ask ourselves in this context is not whether India should undertake such ambitious space ventures, but whether India can afford to ignore it,” said K. Kasturirangan, a former ISRO chief.India has to aim to be a leader in space, he added.Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, head of space policy at the Observer Research Foundation, a New Delhi think tank, said Chandrayaan-2 will enhance the nation’s reputation “at a time when the global and particularly, the Asian space programmes are becoming increasingly competitive”.Amitabha Ghosh, a scientist for NASA’s Rover mission to Mars, said the benefits of Chandrayaan-2 are huge, compared to its cost.”A spacecraft mission of the complexity of Chandrayaan-2 conveys a message that India is capable of delivering on difficult technology development endeavours,” said Ghosh.However, some experts say anyone looking for a cheap ticket to space should think of the comfort on low-cost plane rides closer to Earth.Scott Hubbard, a former top NASA researcher now with Stanford University, examined the cost-effectiveness of the Indian Mars orbiter against the American Maven mission.Although both launched in 2013, Maven is estimated to have cost 10 times more, but India’s Mangalyaan was only designed to last about a year.”The US mission was required to last two years. That’s a big difference in cost,” said Hubbard. And Mangalyaan’s payload was 15 kg, while Maven could carry 65 kg with more sophisticated instruments.”So you get what you pay for,” concluded Hubbard. – AFP {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more

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