Ben Polk contributes 2 assists in Syracuse debut

first_img Published on September 4, 2015 at 7:02 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+ Ben Polk pulled his warm-up shirt over his head and got up from the bench to be substituted into the game. Standing with a green pinny on the sideline, he nervously awaited his Syracuse debut.Polk jogged onto the field and less than two minutes into his Orange career, fed a pass to midfielder Liam Callahan for the first goal of the game.“That settled the nerves coming out,” Polk said. “ …I thought I was going to come out like a chicken with no head for the first five, 10 minutes.”The junior transfer from Herkimer Community College missed SU’s first two games of the season with a leg injury, but in his first game he tallied two assists in 46 minutes as SU (2-1) defeated UC Riverside (1-2), 4-1 at SU Soccer Stadium on Friday.“Ben’s been itching to get out there and it was nice to get him involved,” head coach Ian McIntyre said. “He had an instant impact.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textA little more than a month ago, Polk sustained an ankle injury while scoring a one-time goal in the Premier Development League championship game. The pass came from Callahan. Minutes into his first game action since then, Polk setup near the edge of the box and returned the favor, assisting on Callahan’s first career goal.Polk stayed in for the remaining 17:29 minutes of the first half.  At halftime, he stood near the bench with sweat running down his neck and two cups of water in hand. Team managers and assistant coaches came over and patted him on the back or rubbed his head, which he accepted with a smile.When the second half began, Polk was back on the field. He settled a chipped through ball from midfielder Oyvind Alseth off his chest in the box, but a Highlanders defender knocked it away as he tried to shoot.Polk was getting chances inside the box in scrums, but couldn’t register a shot. The forward was having more success moving to the outside and feeding teammates making runs on goal.“It was pretty hot, but I tried to work hard,” Polk said of the 85-degree day. “… I’m definitely not as fit as I want to be.”Just over sixteen minutes into the half, forward Kenny Lassiter gave Polk a break. McIntyre grabbed him by the shoulder and smiled.Then with 10 minutes to go, Polk came back into the game for one last shift. He popped a pass over a defender’s foot inside the box but lost the ball trying to make a move to the outside.Walking back to the center of the field he looked into the sky and shook his head.“We know he’s got goals in him and they’re going to start coming,” Alseth said.The next time down, Polk stopped with the ball in right side the penalty area and waited before sliding a pass into the middle for forward Noah Rhynart and earning his second assist.Alseth slapped Polk on the back of the head and Korab Syla ran over to make a joke about Polk getting assists and not scoring any goals.Though Polk didn’t score, he was able to be effective passing the ball in his first game since Aug. 2.“When I’m in the game I need to effect the game,” Polk said. “ I don’t want to let it pass me by and just be another man on the field.“I want to be a game changer.” Commentslast_img read more

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Transport: South Africa looks to investors

first_img14 June 2011The government is looking to partner with the private sector to address the infrastructure backlog both in South Africa and on the continent, Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba told an investors’ conference in Cape Town on Monday.South African infrastructure investments as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) had fallen from 16% of GDP in the 1970s to four or five percent of GDP in recent years, Gigaba said.This would be turned around with state company Eskom and Transnet’s built infrastructure programmes, which kicked off in 2004, and the government infrastructure programme announced in 2005.Gigaba said it was important to leverage private-sector funding, pointing out that a number of suppliers to parastatals had large balance sheets and could perhaps help roll out more infrastructure.Companies in the mining, financial and industrial sectors, as well as the state’s development finance institutions, could play a key role in funding infrastructure projects, he said.At the same time, “we need to be clear … that such partnerships, of whatever nature, must have the aim that the state’s control of strategic assets should be retained.”Gigaba said key sectors of the economy were dependent on the availability of quality infrastructure, which could either constrain growth or increase productivity.South Africa can also begin to play an active role on the continent to partner with fellow African countries to develop their infrastructure, he said.New transport regulator to boost investmentTo help boost private investment in South Africa’s transport industry, the Department of Transport and the Treasury will be creating a single economic regulator within the next two years, Business Day reported on Tuesday.According to Business Day, the move is “recognition by the government that the segment is unattractive to the private sector”.Tranport Director-General George Mahlalela told the conference on Monday that South Africa’s “evolving tariff regime is reactive and does not allow for predictable tariff structures to influence the cost of doing business or guide investment regimes”.Mahlalela said the new regulator would provide certainty by overseeing the pricing of all transport infrastructure, including road, rail, maritime and aviation infrastructure.SAinfo reporter and BuaNewslast_img read more

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Ohio Beef Expo enjoyed success in 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) hosted more than 30,000 participants and attendees at the Ohio Expo Center in March for the 2018 Ohio Beef Expo.The Expo provides an annual opportunity for those in the cattle industry in Ohio, and across the nation, to learn and enhance their operations through a three-day trade show, cattle sales, youth events and educational seminars.Five breed shows and two breed parades were featured Friday, as well as numerous breed displays representing the Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Maine-Anjou, Miniature Hereford, Murray Grey, Red Angus, Simmental and Shorthorn breeds. The Genetic Pathway, located in the Showbloom breed’s barn, had the industry’s most popular sires and donor prospects on display throughout the weekend. Six breed sales brought in large crowds on Saturday, March 17, selling 374 lots with an average price of $2,864 and a gross of $1,197,125.Two recipients were honored with the Friend of the Expo Award for their contribution to the Expo’s annual success. Linde Sutherly, New Carlisle, and Nancy Snook, Caldwell, were both honored. Sutherly is the owner of Linde’s Livestock Photos and a huge supporter of OCA youth programs. She has been the official Expo photographer since 2014. Snook has been actively involved in the Expo since her family participated in the first Ohio Beef Expo in 1988. Since then, Snook has served on the junior show committee, facilitated the judging contest and most recently taught youth beef quality assurance.Friday was Youth Day, sponsored by Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. The day began with the judging contest where over 450 youth participated. First place winners included: Beau Johnson, Gallia County (Junior Division); Wally Minges, Butler County (Senior Division); Brooke Simon, Hannah Lang, Ethan Davies and Samantha VanVorhis, Wood County (Junior Team); and Katelyn Cowdrey, Adrianne Moran and Amber Storey, Brown County (Senior Team).In addition, nearly 500 youth participated in beef quality assurance training. Junior exhibitors could also take advantage of two fitting and clipping demonstrations and a welcome pizza party.Events continued Saturday with over 500 exhibitors in the showmanship competition, sponsored by Cattle Visions, LLC and ShowBloom. The top finishers in showmanship included first place in Novice Showmanship: Caroline Winter from Pickaway County, Beginner Showmanship: Carly Sanders from Highland County, Junior Showmanship: Beau Johnson from Gallia County, Intermediate Showmanship: Allison Davis from Carroll County, and Senior Showmanship: Kyle Piscione from Medina County.The junior portion wrapped up Sunday with the market animal show and heifer show with a combined total of nearly 900 head from across the state. During the junior show, Natalie Wagner, Brown County, was awarded the $1,000 Saltwell Expo scholarship, funded by the Saltwell Western Store and Ohio Beef Expo.During the event, OCA volunteers signed up and renewed nearly 200 memberships including NCBA members. Any current or new OCA member had the opportunity to win some great prizes. The OCA County Affiliate of Darke County won the County Affiliate Recruitment Contest drawing and received their choice of a grill or set of Tru-Test Scales sponsored by the Ohio Corn Marketing Program.The Expo featured a trade show featuring more than 130 vendors from 17 states. Cashman’s Equipment was selected as the premier large booth exhibitor, Weaver Leather Livestock was selected as the premier small booth exhibitor and Lance’s Trailer Sales was selected as the premier outdoor exhibitor. An educational seminar, Accessing Current and Future Cattle Markets, jointly sponsored by AllFlex USA, Inc. and United Producers, Inc. took place on Saturday, March 17.A complete list of the event’s sponsors can be found at www.ohiobeefexpo.com. The dates for the 2019 Ohio Beef Expo are March 15-17. Visit www.ohiobeefexpo.com for more information as well as complete coverage of the 2018 event.last_img read more

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CWG fiasco is a metaphor of our daily experience

first_imgYears ago when Muhammad Ali proclaimed that he was the greatest, he was the greatest. As heavy weight boxing champion of the world he had defeated every possible challenger and his claim was merely a statement of that fact. Muhammad Ali has never been known for modesty, but sports figures like Federer and Woods, though arguably the greatest of all time in their chosen sport, rarely bring up the subject on their own. Their greatness is claimed by others around them. Indian public life by contrast is a daily barrage of hyperbole, arrogance, false claims and often outright lies. With virtually nothing to back them, the Indian Commonwealth Organising Committee makes public and international statements so outlandish and arrogant, to be laughable. The Commonwealth Games will be the best ever. The stadia are better than Beijing. The facilities are 5-star…As if to remind the claimant of his conceit, a ceiling buckled at a stadium. Just when the Chief Minister was calling a waterlogged city of broken roads, world class, as if on cue, a bridge collapsed.InflationWhen the daily sights and sounds are of failure, hyperbole and superlatives become essential even for the most mediocre of accomplishments. Hailed as the pride of India, Delhi’s international airport has been designed and built by a consortium of foreign companies. Yet the insistence by the Prime Minister that the structure was a symbol of Indian ingenuity was a desperate call to all those within hearing distance that India had arrived. Even if we were not better than others, we were at least almost like them. In every utterance there is an urgent need to repair the shaky confidence of a nation riddled with daily signs of ineptness and greed.advertisementSo desperate is the urge to falsify reality, that its replacement is not a modest parting of relevant information, but hopeless exaggeration. Public remarks are coated in either misinformation or vagueness. Or are just clever rebuttals. The Naxals are not anti-national, but are a problem to the nation-state. We can’t distribute the rotting wheat; it has to be done through the Public Distribution System. The judiciary is not above the law, the judiciary is the law.Part of the problem lies with a society that despite its claim to modernity, still refuses to think outside of the family. Nothing of national, regional or local interest can be of any value to people whose allegiance is firmly stuck in the private progress of the household. Indian business models seem quaint but outmoded to foreigners when the management of sizeable industrial resources are shared amongst relatives: brothers and sons as MDs, wives and daughters as sleeping partners. Ministers’ sons are natural contenders for succession, even if more qualified candidates are available. Every year the railways most successful expansion program is linked to setting up stations at the minister’s ancestral village, however remote. With easy availability of national resources, progress of the Indian family is always possible?Moreover, the incapacity to do, is intrinsically linked to the capacity to pass responsibility. Even a cursory glance will reveal that India has an extensive institutional and public framework for governance that consistently fails to deliver. In forestry alone there are several national institutes and departments doing research, experimentation, afforestation, surveys, management, species development, preservation, conservation, land control etc.. Yet India ranks amongst countries with one of the highest levels of depleting forest cover in the world. There may be a surplus of wheat in India, but without its distribution, India also has the highest deaths from malnutrition. Government departments continue to research and publish papers on new improved fire retardant thatch for village homes, but fund only the construction of pucca cement roofs. The disconnect between the resolve and the reality is so complete it is hard to know when to laugh, when to cry.KnowledgeA recent article described the inauguration of a speed breaker on a national highway. While the speed breaker was decorated with Rangoli, the road was closed for the day. In the evening, a Hindu priest recited shlokas, and the minister of Surface Transport got on all fours and broke a coconut against the speed breaker. Though the inauguration caused a 12 km truck traffic jam, the event was perceived by all to be essential, a successful integration of new infrastructure with traditional ritual. I reread the piece to figure out whether this was a serious report or satire. But even after several readings could not tell. In most situations, it is hard to tell the two apart.advertisementTry stopping someone on the road for directions. He points vaguely in the direction that your car faces, and asks you to continue to go straight, then gesturing towards the right with his arm he will ask you to turn left; and suggest you ask someone there. By ensuring that you are now doubly confused, he will have at least conveyed that he is in the know of things, a man about town; his vanity must be salvaged at all costs.Rarely will someone say “My knowledge of this neighbourhood lacks the urban coordinates, landmarks and magnetic pole positions that would allow me to do justice to your enquiry. Could I direct you to someone better informed, more trustworthy and infinitely more courteous than myself.”UnrealPart of the Indian failure to complete the preparations for the Commonwealth Games on time was the inability to realistically assess situations, and to say, No, Give it to Fiji. They’ll do a better job. At every press conference pointed questions about tardiness and sloppy work were addressed with phrases like, “We are doing our best. We are giving everything we have. The whole nation is praying for success. We must put our best foot forward. It’s in God’s hands.” Public briefings and press releases speak to a nation as if addressing a child’s birthday party.Everyday, every paper, every report becomes a mix of the serious and frivolous, part truth, part moral indignation, part hope. A cover for the darker stains of India. Thieving forest officials, military attacks on Naxals and Kashmiris, food godowns brimming with rotting wheat, rural malnutrition and farmer suicides, incomplete international games, falling bridges, waterlogged cities, the daily upheavals are tinged with comedy. In a place with an increasing quantum of daily human suffering, heightened public expectation, and the cartoon characters that pose as potential providers, comic relief becomes the only way to assuage collective guilt. Laugh and forget.Some years ago, in a supposedly successful television campaign to sell the country to foreigners under the title of Incredible India, a television ad showed a variety of images: a Kuchipudi dancer, a remote Rajasthani palace, a set of sand dunes, a snow covered mountain, an empty beach, a Buddhist monk in a hill side monastery. Every image distilled into a picture book pastoral stillness. So removed was it from the real experience of India, that the campaign was bound to succeed. An outright lie, it reinforced every picturesque stereotype of traditional India. Wherever possible, words, images and other forms of sensory stimulation are an essential buffer from the real India. The unreal, the imagined, the hoped for, the preferred, the recalled, eventually become a messy amalgam in the daily life of the country. It is hard to tell one from the other.When my son was just a kid I’d take him to Appu Ghar to ride in Bump’Em cars. He would maneuvre his car very carefully, giving signals and ensuring he didn’t hit any one, and I would need to goad him into active hostility: Drive like you are on a Delhi road. The real world was an outright lie. It has taken him a few years to learn, but he has.advertisementThe writer is an architectlast_img read more

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