#JaVotes2016: Candidates move to calm supporters in Mountain View

first_imgThe PNP and JLP candidates for Eastern St Andrew, Fayval Williams and Andre Hylton have moved to bring the confrontation between their supporters at the Mountain View Primary School under control. “We understand that about 25 persons clad in orange showed up to vote but questions were raised about where they lived, but we went down and sorted out the situation and calmed tempers so that they could be allowed to vote in peace,” Williams told The Gleaner. For his part, Andre Hylton said that he has heard of the incident and that his team is on the ground managing the situation. “We heard of an incident at the Mountain View Primary but my team has gone down there to address the situation and to maintain calm,” he said. ST ANDREW EASTERN CANDIDATES JLP: Fayval Williams PNP: Andre Hyltonlast_img read more

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Transport: South Africa looks to investors

first_img14 June 2011The government is looking to partner with the private sector to address the infrastructure backlog both in South Africa and on the continent, Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba told an investors’ conference in Cape Town on Monday.South African infrastructure investments as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) had fallen from 16% of GDP in the 1970s to four or five percent of GDP in recent years, Gigaba said.This would be turned around with state company Eskom and Transnet’s built infrastructure programmes, which kicked off in 2004, and the government infrastructure programme announced in 2005.Gigaba said it was important to leverage private-sector funding, pointing out that a number of suppliers to parastatals had large balance sheets and could perhaps help roll out more infrastructure.Companies in the mining, financial and industrial sectors, as well as the state’s development finance institutions, could play a key role in funding infrastructure projects, he said.At the same time, “we need to be clear … that such partnerships, of whatever nature, must have the aim that the state’s control of strategic assets should be retained.”Gigaba said key sectors of the economy were dependent on the availability of quality infrastructure, which could either constrain growth or increase productivity.South Africa can also begin to play an active role on the continent to partner with fellow African countries to develop their infrastructure, he said.New transport regulator to boost investmentTo help boost private investment in South Africa’s transport industry, the Department of Transport and the Treasury will be creating a single economic regulator within the next two years, Business Day reported on Tuesday.According to Business Day, the move is “recognition by the government that the segment is unattractive to the private sector”.Tranport Director-General George Mahlalela told the conference on Monday that South Africa’s “evolving tariff regime is reactive and does not allow for predictable tariff structures to influence the cost of doing business or guide investment regimes”.Mahlalela said the new regulator would provide certainty by overseeing the pricing of all transport infrastructure, including road, rail, maritime and aviation infrastructure.SAinfo reporter and BuaNewslast_img read more

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How to Frame a Low-Angle Shot Like a Master Cinematographer

first_imgGet the lowdown on low-angle shots from master filmmakers like Kubrick and Tarantino!Top Image: Inglourious Basterds via The Weinstein Company. Directors like Quentin Tarantino know exactly how and when to use a low-angle shot. A shot like this is used with a very specific purpose in mind, and it’s not just Tarantino using them… they’re used to great effect by plenty of others, like Stanley Kubrick, Alfred Hitchcock, Christopher Nolan, and Paul Thomas Anderson.Just like the medium shot we covered recently,  the low-angle shot is a standard camera angle used to frame characters on screen. This shot can be utilized in between a long shot and a close-up. For this cinematography breakdown, we’ll highlight the best uses of low-angle shots in film history.The Standard Low-Angle ShotLow-angle shots frame characters from below the waistline looking upward. This type of shot carries with it a very specific visual language to the audience. The best use of a low-angle shot is to utilize it in enhancing the audience’s perception of your character or characters. This enhancement can be for good or bad, as we’ll discuss.Image: From The Invisible Man via Universal Pictures.As seen above, the visual language of a low-angle shot is to convey to the audience that the character is either heroic, strong, or domineering. While most low-angle shots are framed in a medium shot, there are instances of filmmakers using wide or close-ups as well. For this shot from 1933’s The Invisible Man, director James Whale uses the low-angle shot to show Dr. Griffin at the height of his insanity, thus the visual language tells us that he’s a domineering or imposing force.When capturing a low-angle shot, it’s best to use a wider angle lens. Using a lens like this will help you capture the visual information surrounding the characters in the frame. It also helps to make the character seem bigger than they really are.Image: From Inglorious Basterds via The Weinstein Company.Great examples of using a wide-angle lens in a low-angle shot are hidden away in every Quentin Tarantino film. He actually uses the low-angle shot so much that it’s been nicknamed to reflect the way he usually uses it: the “trunk shot.” This name comes from the famous shot in Reservoir Dogs where Mr. White, Mr. Pink and Mr. Blonde open the trunk of the car. Tarantino has been using this shot ever sense. One of the best uses of this type of low-angle shot was in 2009’s Inglourious Basterds.In this scene, Brad Pitt and Eli Roth are kneeling over an unseen Nazi solider into whose forehead they’ve just carved a swastika.  While these two characters can be seen as heroes in the film, Tarantino frames them in a domineering way in this shot, reenforcing their strength to the audience.Image: From The Avengers via Marvel Studios.Perhaps no film genre uses the low-angle shot more than superhero films. You could essentially call the low-angle shot the “hero shot” and people would know exactly what you were talking about. While we usually get several individual hero shots during a filme like The Avengers, we also get a medium low-angle shot of the entire ensemble as seen above.The Low-Angle Wide ShotJust like the medium shot, low-angles can also be used with wide framing. Many directors have used this technique, but usually in conjunction with some sort of dolly or tracking shot. The meaning behind taking such a wide view is to present the audience with the world around the hero or villain in the shot.Image: From Psycho via Paramount Pictures. Alfred Hitchcock used the low-angle shot to highlight the demonstrative presence of the Bates home in the 1960 film Psycho.  This works so well in this film that the house is almost a character unto itself.Image: From The Dark Knight via Warner Bros.Low-angle shots don’t always have to be stationary. In the 2008 film The Dark Knight, director Christopher Nolan and cinematographer Wally Pfister use the low-angle quite often when showing the Joker. For the sequence when the Joker and Batman face off on the streets of Gotham, Nolan and Pfister chose to keep the camera angle low. Then they tracked toward and past the Joker as Batman drives by. They mirrored this with a low-angle parallax of the Joker turning. This type of shot is incredibly powerful and cinematically amazing to watch.The Low-Angle Close-UpAnother widely used low-angle framing method is the close-up. Close-ups are used just as they are in the standard medium shot, to give the audience a sense of dramatic tension or to add importance to the character in the frame.A unique way of using the low-angle close-up was in Stanley Kubrick‘s 1980 film The Shining. During the pantry scene, Jack is beginning to let the hotel and its forces turn him against his family. Sensing this, his wife Wendy locks him in the pantry. In a brilliant move, Kubrick took the camera and sat it on the floor and framed the low-angle shot in such a way that Jack nearly fills the frame while hovering over the audience. His dominate and dangerous nature is completely evident to the audience.Paul Thomas Anderson used a more conventional approach for this low-angle shot in the 2007’s There Will Be Blood. Trying to get in the good graces of the township, Daniel Plainview attends a church service and goes to the front to confess his sins to the congregation. Anderson uses this low-angle shot to show two dominate forces in the narrative. First we see Daniel, framed low and looking like the overbearing individual he’s been thus far. Additionally, after being convinced to repent of his sins, Daniel rests below the cross behind him as Eli humiliates him in front of the congregation.Lastly let’s look at another close-up, but this time one with movement. In this scene from the 1985 film The Color Purple, director Steven Spielberg uses the low-angle shot with a parallax to show a transition in the film. Throughout the film, Celie had been the subordinate to her abusive husband. However, when she grows in strength and decides to leave him, she stands tall above him. This was a great choice by Spielberg. It clearly showed the audience that she was the hero of the narrative.Are there any other directors who use the low-angle shot perfectly? What are your favorite low-angle shots? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

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Archbishop orders NB churches to return federal cash over abortion pledge

first_imgMONCTON, N.B. – A New Brunswick archbishop has ordered several Roman Catholic parishes to return federal funding they applied for without reading the fine print on abortion rights.Moncton Archbishop Valery Vienneau says the church cannot compromise its values just to please the government.“We’re in a democracy, so why should we have to compromise our values to get some summer jobs for students?” Vienneau asked.The Liberal government this year required that organizations seeking funding under the program check a box affirming their support for constitutional rights and the right to reproductive choice, including access to abortion.The government says it is not targeting beliefs or values, but churches and other faith-based organizations say they are being forced to choose between staying true to their values and seeking grants to help them run programs — from summer camps to soup kitchens — that have nothing to do with abortion.“We cannot compromise our human, Catholic, Christian values just to please the government,” Vienneau said.Vienneau said he sent a memo to all the parishes earlier this year, telling them not to apply for the summer job funding, but some had already sent in their applications.He said some of those churches were granted federal funding for student summer jobs, but the parishes didn’t read the fine print and he has told them to refuse the money.He said the diocese usually hires 25 to 30 students each summer for a variety of projects such as office work and the upkeep of cemeteries.“Of course we are distressed that we are losing all these summer jobs for the students. Some parishes will try to raise the money for some projects, but some will probably not be able to do that,” he said.The federal government takes issue with the church’s position.In an email to The Canadian Press, Emily Harris, senior communications advisor for Employment, Workforce Development and Labour Minister Patty Hajdu, said organizations do not have to support rights, they must respect them, and not actively undermine them.She said when the churches are saying that they are “losing” jobs for students, they are actively refusing the funds.“We are proud that over 3,000 paid summer jobs are approved in New Brunswick for this summer thanks to our government’s doubling of the Canada Summer Jobs program. All of these approved employers submitted complete applications and are eligible,” she wrote.“It is disappointing to learn that some organizations are being pressured by their leadership to drop out of the program, because we know that many of these organizations have provided excellent work experience opportunities for summer students in past years.”Of 42,708 applications to the program, 1,559 were deemed ineligible because of the attestation requirement, according to a government answer to a Commons order paper question tabled by Conservative MP Bob Zimmer.Vienneau said he’s had no contact with government officials but hopes the application is changed for next year.— By Kevin Bissett in Fredericton.last_img read more

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Look south study finds analogues for future climate of US Canadian cities

first_imgWondering what the climate in your city will be like in a few decades?An unusual study published today suggests you should look about 1,000 kilometres to the south.Matt Fitzpatrick of the University of Maryland says that’s the average distance between 540 cities in the U.S. and Canada and the closest place that resembles what their climate will become.Fitzpatrick says if nothing changes, Montreal can expect a climate similar to that of Chester, Pennsylvania.Vancouver will feel a lot like Seattle and Calgary’s weather will resemble what folks in Spearfish, South Dakota, now experience.Fitzpatrick acknowledges his calculations are approximate.They don’t take into account extreme weather, for example, and the climate in some cities won’t resemble anything that exists currently.But Fitzpatrick says the idea of climate analogues is intended to help people understand how radically the world is changing.  The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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