Soprano primed to hit right notes

first_imgPaul Deegan believes star mare Midnight Soprano could take her game to another level this season ahead of her return to action in the Cork Racecourse Mallow Noblesse Stakes. The six-year-old won five races, including two Listed prizes, during a superb 2012 campaign and looks to have a fine opportunity to open her Pattern-race account in this mile-and-a-half Group Three. From what he has seen at home, Deegan thinks there are signs Midnight Soprano is in better shape than she has ever been. “It’s a good Group Three but she won’t mind the ground and gets the trip well. She’s fit and she’s well and I’m looking forward to getting her started. She has been an absolute star for us over the past few seasons, a beautiful natured mare and a pleasure to have in the yard,” said the trainer. “She has done better over the past winter than any before, and has really strengthened this time around. Hopefully it brings about another bit of improvement in her. “She won the Saval Beg on really soft ground last year but she seems to go on most types of ground. Her sister (Celtic Soprano) got a bit sharper as she got older and this mare might be the same. A mile and a half is probably her optimum trip. She takes very little work and gets naturally fit. Her last few pieces of work have been very pleasing.” The Kevin Prendergast-trained Majenta takes a significant step up in class, just a week after winning in handicap company at the Curragh. Prendergast said: “She’s run three times and won twice, and we’d like to get her some black type. Her owner Joerg Vasicek is a breeder and he got the record price of 215,000 euro at the Goffs Land Rover Sale for a three-year-old during the week. “She’s come out of the Curragh race very well. It looks a hot contest but she’s getting weight-for-age, and we’ll be hoping to get her into the placings.” A field of 10 has been declared, with Dermot Weld’s Ribblesdale heroine Princess Highway the highest rated filly in the field. There are two challengers from Britain in Ralph Beckett’s Cubanita and Testosterone from Ed Dunlop’s yard. Beckett said: “She’s in good form and I think the trip and ground should be in her favour, which is why we’re travelling over with her. She’s obviously got her work cut out to beat Dermot Weld’s filly, but she’s in great shape and we’ll give it a go.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Group home rules approved

first_img“I believe that this council and everybody here has done everything we can under the law to put an ordinance on the books that can help,” Councilman Greg Nordbak said. “We are better off with this ordinance than 12 months ago.” The new law, which still must be approved a second time by the council, bans boarding homes, residential-care facilities and shelters in single-family residential areas and requires a conditional-use permit for them in other areas of the city. Permits for shelters and residential-care facilities would require a management plan detailing how the residents would be supervised, staffing levels, security and overall house rules. Boarding houses could have no more than five people in them or two people per room. Gloria Avila, one of the residents who has been concerned about Perez’s intentions, said Wednesday she believes the law will help. “We’ve got an ordinance in the city of Whittier that recognizes these things are going to happen,” Avila said. “\ something to refer back to now. There are more regulations on these kind of homes.” However, there is a potential loophole in the law, city officials said. Federal and state laws don’t allow the city to regulate families, said Krista Jee, assistant city attorney. Jee said some sober-living homes in other cities have called themselves “families” as a way to get around local regulations. It’s difficult to make a distinction between a family or a boarding house, Jee said. “Cities are not allowed to make a distinction of a family based upon the relationship of the individuals,” Jee said. “It can’t be a requirement that they are biologically related.” The ordinance defines a family as two or more people living together that is a “relatively permanent bona-fide housekeeping unit.” It must have a “relationship based upon birth, marriage or other domestic bond of social, economic and psychological commitments to each other.” Perez, who sparked the controversy by proposing to put a sober-living home at his house, said he doesn’t believe the ordinance will affect his plans. In a sober-living establishment, no treatment is provided, but individuals in recovery are expected to maintain an alcohol- and drug-free lifestyle by establishing a living environment that supports sobriety and recovery. As long as there are no more than six people and treatment isn’t provided, the state doesn’t regulate it. “This is going to be a family home with people with many disabilities,” he said. “There will be no criminal element. “I’m only interested in helping people who were beginning to have a problem,” Perez said. “It’s going to be a nurturing family home. It’s not a threat to anybody.” mike.sprague@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – The City Council has approved an ordinance adding regulations to boarding houses, residential-care facilities and shelters as a way of responding to concerns about a proposed sober-living home in the Palm Park area. A sober-living home was proposed about a year ago for a house in the 10000 block area of Orange Drive. However, this proposal by Jerry Perez, owner of the home, led residents to picket and make an appeal to the city. The ordinance approved unanimously Tuesday is the city’s answer. last_img read more

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