PREVIEW FINALS DAY 2007 SENIORS NTL

first_imgThe 2007 National Touch League Senior tournament culminates with Finals day tomorrow at the BCU International Stadium in Coffs Harbour with semi-finals and grand finals to be played across seven hotly contested divisions.Can Suns exceptional form hold in the Men’s 30s division?Will the Sharkies Men’s 35s “World XIV” sweep all before them and go back to back in 2007?Can Scorpions grab a hat trick of Titles in the Men’s 40s?Will home town hopes the Northern Eagles send local fans into raptures with a title in the Men’s 45s division?Can Cobras keep their pristine tournament record intact in the Men’s 50s to claim the crown?In the Women’s 30s division, Can the Tropical North Queensland Cyclones annex the title for the first time in NTL history?Will the Scorpions Women’s 40s team clap the bookies in irons by claiming their fourth NTL championship in a row?Stay tuned, sports fans, all will be revealed tomorrow on 2007 Senior NTL Finals day.For the results and tables for all divisons go to the TFA SPORTINGPULSE WEBSITE8.00amMen’s 50s SF1:     Cobras v HornetsMen’s 50s SF2:     Eagles v ScorpionsWomen’s 40s SF1:  Scorpions v Sharks Women’s 40s SF2: Cyclones v Suns9.00amMen’s 45s SF1:     Eagles v RustlersMen’s 45s SF2:     Suns v SharksMen’s 40s SF1:     Scorpions v MetsMen’s 40s SF2:     Suns v Sharks10.00amMen’s 35s:               Sharks v CobrasMen’s 35s:               Scorpions v Mets11.00amWomen’s 40s Final:      TBCMen’s 50s Final:            TBC12.00pmMen’s 45s Final:           TBCWomen’s 30s SF 1: Cyclones v HornetsWomen’s 30s SF 2: Rustlers v Suns1.00pmMen’s 40s Final:           TBCMen’s 30s SF 1:     Suns v BarbariansMen’s 30s SF2:      Warriors v Rustlers2.00pm                   Presentations2.30pmMen’s 35s Final:      Sharks v Cobras3.30pmWomen’s 30s Final:       TBC4.30pmMen’s 30s Final:           TBC5.30pm                        Presentationslast_img read more

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Photo: Nebraska Students Will Wear #AveryStrong T-Shirts During Saturday’s Game vs. Michigan State

first_imgNebraska's #AveryStrong shirts.Saturday is #AveryStrong day for the Nebraska men’s basketball program. Avery Harriman, the 7-year-old son of Huskers’ assistant coach Chris Harriman, has battled leukemia since he was 2. He’s been an inspiration to Tim Miles’ team this season and the Huskers’ players are constantly interacting with their No. 1 fan. Saturday’s event will be part of the National Association of Basketball Coaches Suits and Sneakers Awareness Week. Chris Harriman says #Huskers players are constantly asking about Avery. “Its fun to see them be happy when hes doing well” #AveryStrong— Jake Bockoven (@jakebockoven) January 23, 2015Nebraska (11-7, 3-3 Big Ten) is set to host Michigan State (13-6, 4-2 Big Ten) in Lincoln Saturday. During the game, the Huskers’ students will be wearing #AveryStrong T-shirts. First 1,500 students. #GBR “@HuskerSports: Getting the shirts in place for #AveryStrong tomorrow. #Huskers” pic.twitter.com/SpUsRoHGml— Nebraska Huskers (@Huskers) January 23, 2015Nebraska and Michigan State are set to tip off at 4 p.m. E.T. The game will be televised on ESPN.last_img read more

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Mississippi State Releases Awesome “Relentless” Hype Video

first_imgA Mississippi State player scores a touchdown over an LSU defender.Mississippi State Hype VideoMississippi State suffered a tough loss to Georgia Tech in last year’s Orange Bowl, but all in all, the Bulldogs had a great season. MSU opened the 2014 campaign with nine straight victories, including wins over LSU, Auburn and Arkansas, before falling in a close contest to Alabama. The Bulldogs, in early November, were the No. 1 ranked team in the country. And they posted double-digit victories for just the second time in their program’s history.The 2015 Bulldogs aren’t being picked by many to be quite as successful, but with star quarterback Dak Prescott returning, they may surprise a few people. Thursday, the school released an awesome hype video titled “Relentless” to tease the 2015 campaign. Enjoy, MSU fans:last_img

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Deport Them Arpaio Departs From Trump On DACA Recipients

first_img Share Ralph Freso/Getty ImagesMaricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio speaks during a Donald Trump campaign rally on Aug. 31, 2016 in Phoenix, Ariz.Joe Arpaio, the controversial former sheriff from Arizona, announced this week that he will run for the U.S. Senate to help advance President Trump’s agenda.But he’s breaking from the president on people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.“Deport them,” Arpaio told NPR’s Morning Edition in an interview airing Thursday morning.“When we come across these kids, or some are older than just kids,” Arpaio said, “then deport them. You deport them back to the country they came from.”Arpaio, 85, is someone who has devoted his career to cracking down on immigrants in the U.S. illegally and used highly controversial tactics toward that goal — sometimes in defiance of federal court orders. He instructed his deputies, for example, to detain Latino residents and ask them about their legal status. He then ignored a federal judge’s order to stop.He was convicted of criminal contempt for that last year. But President Trump pardoned him.The immigration firebrand’s entrance into the Arizona race could have far-reaching consequences for the party, as Arpaio’s views will likely receive an outsize megaphone. It will likely mean that immigration — and conservative hard-line views on the subject — will dominate a Republican primary in a state that is now almost a third Latino and in a country where Hispanics are gaining increasing clout politically nationally.DACA recipients as ambassadors, like the Peace Corps?Under President Obama, after the House did not pass the comprehensive immigration bill that garnered 68 votes in the Senate, immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children were allowed to stay in the country under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, executive order.Trump rescinded DACA last year and is letting it expire by March. Trump’s decision is now hung up in the courts, but he said this week that he wants a “bill of love” that allows the some 800,000 DACA recipients to stay. That, however, comes with conditions that Democrats don’t appear ready to accept, including funding for a wall along the Southern U.S. border.Arpaio told NPR that DACA recipients should be sent back in this controversial way:“They can do a lot of good in those countries. They have education here and help out and be good ambassadors from the United States to their country. That’s just my idea.”He likened it to the Peace Corps and indicated he’d be open to them returning later to the United States legally.“Should we deport all the people in Chicago?” But asked about the risks many could face going back to dangerous countries, places some of these DACA recipients have never been or where they don’t speak the language, Arpaio pushed back.“We have danger here, so should we deport all the people in Chicago with all the shooting and murder?” Arpaio asked. “If they want to get out and go to another country, should the other countries welcome them? I don’t think they would.”He continued: “It’s unfortunate there’s problems in other countries, but that’s … you live in those other countries, you have to do something there whether it’s through the political system in those countries to try to alleviate the problem.“We pumped a lot of money into these foreign countries — tons of money to help their security, law enforcement, and that’s OK, but you have to do it right.”“Make sure you get the right people to come into our country”Asked if he would close all of U.S. borders to migrants, Arpaio adamantly said no.“Just make sure you get the right people to come into our country,” he contended, noting that his parents came from Italy. “I have a personal interest in that situation.”Of course, when Arpaio’s parents came from Italy, there were far fewer restrictions, and immigration was most certainly not “merit-based.” Italians at the turn of the century and into the mid-20th Century, like people in other countries today, were escaping poverty, war and famine.It wasn’t the doctor from Milan heading to America.A history of controversyIn the 1990s, Arpaio controversially also set up an outdoor Tent City jail in the blistering Arizona sun. It was criticized as inhumane by activists, and his successor said there was no evidence it made people less likely to commit crimes.It began to be torn down last year and was closed in October.Arpaio was also closely linked to the “Birther Movement,” which peddled the falsehood that President Obama was not born in the United States.That’s how Arpaio and Trump got to know each other.How Arpaio’s run could affect politics in Arizona and nationallyBecause of his reputation, Arpaio would be a highly controversial figure running in the Republican primary. But his candidacy might cut a couple of different ways.On the one hand, he will draw unwanted attention for the GOP nationally.On the other, Arpaio could unwittingly help establishment Republicans’ preferred candidate get the nomination. It’s possible he splits the vote with another hard-line conservative, Kelli Ward, and opens an avenue for Rep. Martha McSally, who is expected to announce her candidacy Friday.In fact, a poll, paid for by a local TV station in Arizona, out Wednesday showed exactly that — McSally with 31 percent, Arpaio at 29 and Ward with 25.National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Cory Gardner, the senator from Colorado, declined Wednesday to explicitly rule out throwing the NRSC’s support behind Arpaio if he wins the primary.“It’s too early to speculate who’s going to win, who’s not going to win,” Gardner said on MSNBC, adding, “I think that is a conversation much further down the road.”Gardner was publicly critical and refused to support controversial Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, who was accused of sexual assault by multiple women, many of whom were teenagers at the time of the allegations. When it came to Arpaio, Gardner declined to take the same stance.“It’s difficult to compare what happened in Alabama to any other state,” Gardner said. He seemed willing to let the primary play out instead: “Is he going to be the nominee? I can’t tell that; you can’t tell that, only the people of Arizona can tell that. That’s why we have campaigns; that’s why we have primaries and races. That’s not my choice. That’s not my decision to make at the senatorial committee.”Arpaio’s candidacy will almost guarantee immigration will again be elevated in an election year, something that has not benefited Republicans in the past.“Right now, that’s what we need– is some leadership,” Arpaio told NPR, “and get this problem solved.”It’s the one issue that has galvanized and fired up the most ardent in the conservative base — and made Latinos reliable Democratic voters in the past few elections.Immigration’s potential dominance in this race could have broad potential consequences for the party in the age of Trump and as Arizona and the country continues to become browner.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Is BofAs New Mortgage Program a Substitute for FHA Lending

first_img in Daily Dose, Government, Headlines, News, Origination Affordable Loan Solution Bank of America Federal Housing Administration FHA 2016-03-21 Staff Writer Is BofA’s New Mortgage Program a Substitute for FHA Lending? March 21, 2016 700 Views center_img Bank of America recently announced a new program that cuts the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) out of the mortgage lending equation with its latest mortgage product, dubbed the “Affordable Loan Solution.”The new program will allow low- and moderate-income (LMI) borrowers to put a mere 3 percent down on conforming loans, and it will require no private mortgage insurance—regardless of the total amount of the loan.Karan Kaul, Research Associate I at Urban Institute, recently made the argument that Bank of America’s mortgage solution, while promising, is not a substitute for healthy FHA lending.Kaul noted that the bank’s program has been viewed by some as an “attempt to create a channel for lending to LMI borrowers that bypasses FHA and its heavy enforcement hammer.” However, he says that “such efforts are an alternative to FHA lending, they are not a substitute, as the underlying economics of this deal make it difficult to scale up lending in a manner that would replace FHA.”Terry Francisco, VP of Corporate Communications at Bank of America, told MReport in an interview that the new program provides just such an alternative. In fact, Bank of America expects that three out of the four mortgages generated under the Affordable Loan Solution would have otherwise been backed by the FHA.“This product that we’ve developed in partnership with Freddie Mac and with Self-Help Fund provides an effective alternative for FHA that’s somewhat less expensive, but also structured in a way that we believe will make people successful homeowners and will provide another option for people who are looking to become homeowners or people who could be moving up from one home to another,” Francisco said. “We think it adds more options for low- to moderate-income individuals to either attain homeownership for the first time or move up in the marketplace.”Though it’s meant as a competitor to FHA, requirements for BofA’s program will be slightly different from the FHA’s. In in order to qualify for the program, borrowers will need a FICO credit score of at least 660, as well as a household income that’s less than the median income of the region. When significant credit history is lacking, Francisco said Bank of America will also consider “non-traditional forms of credit.”“What we mean by that is if someone has a thin file, where they don’t have a lot of credit cards or other experience paying debts, if they paid rent on time or if they paid health memberships, cell phone bills—things like that—if they can that they’ve had a strong history of paying those bills on time, that’s acceptable as non-traditional credit,” Francisco saidKaul said that in a market in which LMI borrowers have trouble getting a mortgage, Bank of America’s Affordable Loan Solution “is a welcome effort to find a creative new channel through which many can finally obtain a mortgage.”However, it is important to note that this kind of channel is likely to be limited in scope, for several reasons, according to Kaul:The most significant barrier to larger-scale adoption of programs like this is the shortage of available capital. The ALS model relies solely on capital provided by Self-Help. Nonprofit capital is often sourced via loans or grants from foundations, community development organizations, or the government. Limited funding from these sources means the potential mortgage origination volume through such initiatives is also limited.The second likely barrier is that it will prove difficult for lenders using this type of execution to compete with FHA on price. The most borrower-friendly feature of the ALS mortgage is that PMI, which can cost several hundred dollars per month, is not required. It’s not clear, however, if ALS borrowers will be charged a higher mortgage rate in lieu of PMI. If they are, the potential for savings will be lower.Increasing the loan volume for ALS-like programs will also require lenders to offer much deeper savings to make these loans cheaper than FHA because GSE mortgages require riskier borrowers to pay higher fees, whereas FHA doesn’t.”None of this is to criticize the program, which is a creative effort to improve access for a group of borrowers for whom credit is overly constrained,” Kaul explained. “It is just a reminder to keep the effort in perspective. While programs like this are needed, they are unlikely to offer a substitute for a healthy market in FHA lending, in which lenders are willing to lend further down the credit spectrum to those who fit within FHA’s mission.” Sharelast_img read more

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Interviewed by Louis James Editor International

first_img(Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator)[Skype rings: It’s Doug Casey, calling from Cafayate, Argentina. He sounds tired, but pleased with himself.]Doug: Lobo, get out your mower; it’s time to cut down some green shoots again, and debunk a bit of the so-called recovery.L: Ah. I have to say, Doug, the so-called recovery is looking more than “so-called” to a lot of smart folks. Even our own Terry Coxon says the recovery is real, albeit weak.Doug: Terry’s probably looking at it by the numbers, some of which are reported to be improving. But let’s come back to the numbers later and start with fundamentals. The first order of business, as usual, is a definition: a depression is a period of time in which the average standard of living declines significantly. I believe that’s what we’re seeing now, whatever the numbers produced by the politicians may seem to tell us.L: I was just shopping for food and noticed that the bargain bread was on sale at two for $5. My gas costs almost as much per gallon. That’s got to hurt a lot of people, especially on the lower income rungs. I don’t need to ask; a member of my family just got a job that pays $12 per hour – about three times what I made working for the university food service back when I was in college – and it’s not enough to cover his rent and basic bills. If his wife gets similar work, they’ll make ends meet, but woe unto them if anyone in their family crashes a car or requires serious medical treatment.Doug: That’s just what I mean. Actually, the trend towards both partners in a marriage having to work really started in the early ’70s – after Nixon cut all links between the dollar and gold in August of 1971. Before then, in the “Leave it to Beaver” era, the average family got by quite well with only the husband working. If he got sick or lost his job, the wife was a financial backup system. Now, if something happens to either one, the family is screwed. I think, from a very long-term perspective, historians will one day see the ’60s as the peak of American prosperity – certainly relative to the rest of the world… but perhaps even in absolute terms, even taking continued advances in technology into account. Maybe the ’59 Cadillac was the bell ringing at the top of that civilizational market.My friend Frank Trotter, president of EverBank, was just telling me that the net worth of the median US citizen is only $6,000. That’s the median, meaning that half of the people have less than that. Most people don’t even have enough stashed away to buy the cheapest new car without going into debt. It used to be that people bought cars out of savings, with cash. Now they have to finance them over at least five years… or lease them – which means they never ever have even that trivial asset, but a liability in the form of a lease.The bulk of the 49 percent below this guy don’t even have that – with the concentration of wealth among the top one percent, most of those below average have seriously negative net worth, at least compared to their earning capacity. In other words, the US, Europe, and other so-called First World countries are in a wealth-liquidation cycle that will be as profound as it will be protracted.By that I mean that people are on average consuming more than they produce. That can only be done by living out of capital – consuming savings – or accumulating debt. For a time, this may drive corporate earnings up, and give this dead-man-walking economy the appearance of returning health, but it’s essentially, necessarily, and absolutely unsustainable. This is an illusion of recovery we’re seeing – the result of our Wrong-Way Corrigan politicians continuing to encourage people to do the exact opposite of what they should do.L: Which is?Doug: Save. People shouldn’t be getting new cars, new TVs, and new clothes. They should be cutting expenses to the bone.The Obama administration, just like the Baby Bush administration before it – there really is no great difference between the Evil Party and the Stupid Party – and its minions in the US and its cronies around the world, stubbornly stick to the bankrupt idea that economic growth is driven by consumption. This is confusing cause and effect. Healthy consumption follows profitable production in excess of consumption, resulting in savings – accumulated capital – that can either be spent without harm, or invested in future growth.Consumption doesn’t cause an economy to grow at all. To paraphrase: “It’s productivity that creates wealth, stupid!”L: Policies aimed at encouraging consumption, instead of increasing production, are what turned the savings rate negative in the US and resulted in the huge sovereign debt issues we’re seeing in supposedly rich countries…Doug: Well, the governments themselves have spent way more than they had or ever will have, and that’s par for the course when you believe spending is a virtue. However, it’s the false signals government interference sends to the market that caused the huge malinvestments that only began to go into liquidation in 2008. That has to do with another definition of a depression: It’s a period of time when distortions and malinvestments in the economy are liquidated. Unfortunately, that process has barely even started. In fact, since the bailouts started in 2008, these things have gotten much worse. If the government had gone cold turkey back then, cut its spending by at least 50% for openers, and encouraged the public to do the same, the depression would already be over, and we’d be on our way to real prosperity. But they did just the opposite. So we haven’t yet entered the real meat grinder…L: Those false signals the government sends to the market being artificially low interest rates?Doug: Yes, and Helicopter Ben’s foolish leadership in the wholesale printing of trillions of currency units all around the world – I don’t really want to call dollars, euros, yen, and so forth money anymore. When individuals and corporations get those currency units, they think they’re wealthier than they really are and consume accordingly. Worse, those currency units flow first to the state – which feeds it power – and favored corporations, which get to spend it at old values. It’s very corrupting. There is also an ongoing regulatory onslaught – the government has to show it’s “doing something” – which makes it much harder for entrepreneurs to produce.In addition, keeping interest rates low encourages borrowing, and discourages saving – just the opposite of what’s needed. I don’t believe in any state intervention in the economy whatsoever, but in the crisis of the early 1980s, then-Fed Chairman Paul Volker headed off a depression and set the stage for a strong recovery by keeping rates very high – on the order of 15-18%. They can’t do that now, of course, because with the acknowledged government debt at $16 trillion, those kind of rates would mean $2.5 trillion in annual interest alone – more than the government takes in taxes. At this point, there’s no way out. And there’s much more tinkering with the system ahead, at the hands of fools who remain convinced they know what they’re doing, regardless of how abject their past failures have been.L: And yet, the interventions seem to be working. The “orderly default” in Greece seems to have saved the Eurozone for now, and critically important employment figures in the US show definite signs of improvement.Doug: Perhaps, but let’s take a closer look. I advocate the Greek government defaulting, overtly and immediately, on 100% of its debt, for several reasons. First, it would punish those who lent it money to do all the stupid and destructive things it’s done. Second, it would ensure that the Greek government wouldn’t be able to borrow again for a very long time. Third, it would liberate young and yet unborn Greeks, who are being turned into serfs by all that debt. It would also mean that most European banks would fail. Tough luck for those who relied on them. When new banks are established it will serve as a lesson to people to be more careful about where they put their capital. Anyway, it would be much less of a catastrophe than the way we’re currently heading.Here in the US, the twelve-month fiscal deficit is still over $1.2 trillion, an extreme situation that is gutting the value of the dollar, because it’s mostly financed by the Fed buying US debt. It’s temporarily expanded the eye of the storm we’re in, but it’s done nothing to dissipate the storm itself. Their easy-money policies may have bought them a little more time, but they will only make it worse when we do exit the eye of the storm.There’s a third definition of a depression that I use: a depression is the end phenomenon of an inflation-caused business cycle. Inflation is the sole cause of business cycles, and inflation is caused by governments and their central banks printing money. The government – the state – is 100% responsible for society’s economic problems. But it arrogantly represents itself as the cure. And people believe it. There’s no hope until the psychology of the average person changes.L: As Bob Lefevre used to say: “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure.” Want to update us on when you think the economy will return to panic mode?Doug: Earlier this year, I was expecting it sooner than I do now. Unless some black-swan event upsets the apple cart suddenly, I would not expect us to exit the eye of the storm at least until after the US presidential elections this fall. Maybe not until early 2013, as the reality of what’s in store sinks in. I pity the poor fool who’s elected president. In a way, I hope it’s Obama who wins, mainly because the worthless – contemptible, actually – Republican candidates yap on about believing in the free market, which means if one of them is somehow elected, the free market will be blamed for the catastrophe. Too bad Ron Paul will be too old to run in 2016, assuming that we actually have an election then…L: So, what about those numbers, then? Employment is up, and the oxymoronic notion of a “jobless recovery” was one of our criticisms before…Doug: Yes, but look at the jobs that have been spawned; they are mostly service sector. Such jobs can create wealth for certain individuals – it looks like we’ve put more lawyers to work again, as well as waiters and paper-pushers – but they don’t amount to increased production for the whole economy. They just reshuffle the bits around within the economy.L: Unlike my favorite – mining – which reported 7,000 new jobs in the latest report, if I recall correctly.Doug: Yes, unlike mining, which was more of an exception than the rule in those numbers. But that’s making the mistake of taking the government at its word on employment figures. As we’ve discussed before, if you look at John Williams’ Shadow Stats, which show various economic figures as the US government itself used to calculate them, unemployment has actually reached Great Depression levels.The US government is dishonestly fudging the figures as badly as the Argentine government – which is, justifiably, viewed as an economic laughingstock in most parts of the world. One reason things are going to get much worse in the US is that many of those with economic decision-making power think Cristina Fernandez Kirchner is a genius. A little while ago there was an editorial in the New York Times – the mouthpiece for the establishment – written by someone named Ian Mount. Get a load of this. I’ve got it in front of me.If you can believe it, the author actually says: “Argentina has regained prosperity thanks to smart economic measures.” The Argentine government “intervened to keep the value of its currency low, which boosts local industry by making Argentina’s exports cheaper abroad while keeping foreign imports expensive. Argentina offers valuable lessons … government spending to promote local industry, pro-job infrastructure programs and unemployment benefits does not turn a country into a kind of Soviet parody.”Well, no, I guess it turns it into something the US can ape. He goes on: “Argentina is hardly a perfect parallel for the United States. But the stark difference between its austere policies and low growth of the late 1990s and the pro-government, high-growth 2000s offers a test case for how to get an economy moving again. Washington would do well to pay attention.”The guy has obviously never been here, though he admits that “Argentina is far from perfect.” His modest concession is that the taxes to imports and exports have “scared away some foreign investment, while high spending has pushed inflation well over 20 percent. And it would be laughable to suggest that the United States follow its lead and default on its debt.”When I first read the article, I thought I was reading a parody in The Onion. I love Argentina and spend a lot of time down here. It’s a fantastic place to live – but not because of the government’s economic policies. Its only competition in state stupidity is Brazil, which regularly destroys its currency. Fortunately, though, the Argentine government is quite incompetent at people control, unlike the US. It leaves you alone. And there’s a reasonable chance the next president down here won’t be actively stupid, which isn’t asking much. But it’s amazing that the NYT can advocate Argentine government policy as something the US should follow. A collapse of the US economy would be vastly worse than that of the Argentine economy – the US dollar is the world’s currency. Here in Argentina they’re used to it and prepared for it to a good degree. Very unlike in the US.L: In the US, the welfare state has bloated beyond imagination. The damage already done is less visible because where there used to be private charity soup kitchens, there are now “food stamps” that look like ordinary credit cards, making the destitute among us look like everyone else at the supermarket. There are 50 million recipients, and that number is growing, not declining.By the way, John Williams is a speaker at the Casey Research Recovery Reality Summit we have coming up, April 27-29 in Weston, Florida. Perhaps this would be a good time to invite our readers down to hear John’s take on what the numbers really are – and to meet us. We’ll both be there.Doug: That’s true. Several readers made it to the event we just had at La Estancia de Cafayate, which went very well. We have some of the most interesting people in the world reading these conversations – it’s fun to get to meet more of them.L: Ah, that must be why you sound both upbeat and tired. A pity I didn’t get to sit in on Coffee with Casey with you in the new spa you built down there…Doug: Yes, it’s been a long couple of weeks, but I am pleased. You should see the place now; not only has the spa been completed since you were last here, they’re making good progress on the hotel, and there are houses going up all over the place. I’m tickled pink with our world-class 3,500 square-foot gym, where I was pumping iron for an hour today, and resistance swimming pool, among lots of other stuff. But the real attraction isn’t the toys, it’s the people.L: I’ll see it next time. It may be time to sit down with an architect. Meanwhile, back at the ranch here, what are the investment implications if the Crash of 2012 gets put off until the end of the year, or even becomes the crash of 2013?Doug: There are potentially many, but generally, the appearance of economic activity picking up is bullish for commodities, especially energy and raw materials like industrial metals and lumber. That’s not true for gold and silver, so we might see more weakness in the precious metals in the months ahead. I wouldn’t count on that, however, because government policy is obviously inflationary to anyone with any grasp of sound economics. That will keep many investors on the buy side. Plus, the central banks of the developing world – China, India, Russia, and many others – are constantly trading their dollars for gold. There are perhaps seven trillion dollars outside the US, and about $600 billion more are sent out each year via the US trade deficit.L: I know I bought some gold and silver in the recent dip and would love to have a chance to do so at even lower prices ahead.Doug: That’s the logical thing to do, given the fundamental realities we started this conversation with, but a lot of people will be scared into selling if gold does retreat. A good number will sell low, after buying high – happens every time, and is a big part of why commodities have such a tricky reputation. Most investors just don’t have the strength of conviction to be good speculators. Instead of looking at the world to understand what’s going on and placing intelligent bets on the logical consequences of the trends, regardless of what anyone else says or does, they go with the herd, buying when everyone else is buying and selling when everyone else is selling. This inverts the “buy low and sell high” formula. They let their thoughts be influenced by newspapers and the words of government officials.L: In other words, everything you see calls for gold continuing upward for some time – years – making any big retreats along the way great buying opportunities for those with the guts to act on them. Same for silver, and doubly so for the precious-metals mining stocks, and triply so for the junior stocks.Doug: Just so. I look forward to the day when I can sell my gold for quality growth stocks – but we’re nowhere near that point. But silver might correct less than gold if gold corrects due to the appearance of economic recovery – silver is, after all, an industrial metal as well as a monetary one.L: Agreed. And I can see the positive implications for energy as well, but Marin was just saying that natural gas has dropped below $2. That’s apparently starting to force oil and gas companies to remove reserves from their books – because reserves need to be economic, not just exist – which the market isn’t going to like. He sees some great bargains on solid companies ahead, and not just “gas” companies as many oil companies, including the major ones, produce both. Marin said one major company gets half its top line from gas sales. This is a huge shift.[Ed. Note: Louis is referring to Marin Katusa, chief energy investment strategist for Casey Research and editor of Casey Energy Opportunities and Casey Energy Report.]Doug: The devil is always in the details – it’s dangerous to oversimplify things, painting with a broad brush, as in, “A recovering economy will be bad for gold” or “A recovering economy will be good for energy.” You have to understand these markets well enough to really see how different forces and factors will affect them. Marin is unquestionably one of the sharpest analysts I’ve met in my life. He’s actually something of a genius, both academically smart and very street smart, in addition to being a workaholic. He runs a lot of my money. He’s done spectacularly well, and I expect him to do even better, because he constantly learns. Not much gets by him.L: Good reminder. So, if we’re looking at signs of economic recovery for a time, would you buy into copper, nickel, or other base-metal plays?Doug: Well, just because we might see signs of a temporary economic recovery, that doesn’t mean we will – and even if we do, they could easily be swept aside by any number of events, such as Europe taking another turn for the worse, or Japan or China starting to come apart at the seams. But, as a hedge, some near-term bets on industrial metals might not be a bad thing.L: How about agriculture?Doug: That’s one thing for which demand can never go down. Economic upturns or downturns may affect the mix of what people eat, but they won’t stop people from eating – or, if they do, we’ll have more pressing concerns than which way to play the markets. I remain especially bullish on cattle.L: Anything else?Doug: [Laughs] Many things. The right technology companies should do well; finding ways to do things faster-better-cheaper always adds value. Select mainstream equities in currently profitable sectors might do well as well – but I’d be very careful there. I can’t stress enough how close to the edge of collapse the global economic house of cards is – it could take another year or more to topple, or it could be starting today.L: Which leads to the other reason for owning precious metals – not as a speculation on skyrocketing prices, nor as an investment for good yield, but for prudence.Doug: Yes. Gold remains the only financial asset that is not simultaneously someone else’s liability. Anyone who thinks they have any measure of financial security without owning any gold – especially in the post-2008 world – is either ignorant, naïve, foolish, or all three.Look, we saw it coming, but everyone in the world could see Humpty Dumpty fall off the wall in 2008. Now we’re just waiting for the crash at the bottom, and no amount of wishful thinking otherwise is going to change that. It’s a truly dangerous world out there, and blue chips are no longer the safe investments they once seemed to be. You don’t have to be a gold bug to see the wisdom of allocating some capital – and not just a token amount – to cover the possibility that I’m right about what’s coming. There’s some opportunity cost associated with taking out this kind of insurance, but it’s not catastrophic if I’m wrong, and the cost of failing to do so if I’m right is catastrophic. That really is the bottom line.L: Financially. If you’re right about the coming Greater Depression, people also need to take steps to batten down the hatches on their physical life arrangements.Doug: Right. As we’ve said many times now, your government is the greatest threat to your well-being these days. If at all possible, you should be taking steps to diversify your political risk. Foreign bank accounts are not illegal for most people in most countries, though they need to be reported. Getting one is a good start. Buying real estate I like in various countries is one of my favorite ways to diversify risk in my life. That’s partly because I like speculating in real estate, but much more so because whichever government thinks you’re its tax slave can’t force you to repatriate real estate you own abroad. Most of all, it’s because it’s good to have places to go if things get ugly wherever you happen to be.L: Very well. Any particular triggers you think we should watch out for – warning signs that we really are about to exit the eye of the storm?Doug: In the US, the Fed being forced to raise interest rates would be one, or inflation getting visibly out of control – which would force a change in interest rates – would be another. Who knows – Obama getting reelected could tip the scales. War in the Middle East could do it, or, as we already mentioned, China or Japan going off the deep end. The ways are countless. Black swans the size of pteranodons are circling in squadron strength. A lot of them are coming in for a landing.People will just have to stay sharp – sorry, there’s no easy way to survive a depression. As my friend Richard Russell says, “In a depression everybody loses. The winner is the guy who loses the least.” It will take work and diligent attention to what’s going on in the world and around us. We’ll do our best to help with The Casey Report, but each of us is and must be responsible for ourselves.L: Okay then, thanks for the guru update. No offense, but in spite of the investments I’ve made betting that you’re right, I hope you’re wrong, because the Greater Depression is going to destroy many lives, and the famines and wars it spawns even more – millions, I’m sure. Maybe more. The mind balks.Doug: Oh, I agree. I only wish I could believe otherwise, because I’m sure it’s going to be even worse than I think it will be… although I hope to be watching it in comfort and safety on my widescreen TV, not out my front window.L: I think we need to find something more upbeat to talk about next time.Doug: [Chuckles] Maybe. If there’s something important in the news we should cover it. It’s sure to be fodder for comedy – at least black comedy.L: As you say. ‘Til next week then.last_img read more

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Its been clear to anyone paying attention that th

first_imgIt’s been clear to anyone paying attention that the October “rollout” of Obamacare has been a turbulent, confusing disaster. Sloppy IT systems and technological failures combined to cripple Obamacare’s sign-up systems. Security flaws put Americans at risk for identity theft. In an almost comical understatement, President Obama summarized these massive failures as “a few glitches.” I think that Luke Chung, IT expert and president of database solutions firm FMS, explained the situation much more accurately: “What should clearly be an enterprise quality, highly scalable software application felt like it wouldn’t pass a basic code review. It appears the people who built the site don’t know what they’re doing, never used it and didn’t test it.” Chung went on to call it a “technological disaster.” Think about what this ineptitude means in the bigger debate about Obamacare. The administration spent 3½ years and $698 million of taxpayers’ money to develop this software. They’ve known since earlier this year that the system wasn’t ready to support the rollout of the exchanges. Yet they proceeded anyway, apparently unconcerned about their faulty software costing Americans millions of hours of frustration and lost productivity. These same bureaucrats continue to assume more and more control of our medical care. What does their incompetence say about how they will handle making life-or-death medical care decisions? Like a parasite taking over its host, Obamacare will commandeer almost 20% of our economy, crowding out private options. With 2014 fast approaching, what should we expect in its next phase? Here’s my list Top Ten list for 2014: 1. The expansion of Medicaid, with increased cost burden for taxpayers. Medicaid is a combined state-federal program initially designed to help the neediest among us. But it has burgeoned to cover medical costs for about one in every five people. Today, Medicaid pays for two of every five babies born in the United States, and three of every five people in long-term care facilities in the US. Obamacare will add another 20 million new Medicaid dependents. According to the Kasier Family Foundation, that Medicaid expansion will add an average of 13% to state budgets in costs for 2014 alone. Even though Medicaid was designed to help the poor, studies have consistently shown that Medicaid recipients receive worse medical care than people without any health insurance at all! Medicaid patients have longer waits to see a doctor, fewer specialists to choose from, and poorer medical outcomes overall. A particularly morbid piece of evidence is that on average, Medicaid patients die sooner after surgery than people who have no medical insurance. Essentially, Obamacare is forcing 20 million more Americans into second-class medical care with Medicaid. 2. “Sticker shock” as the reality of higher health insurance premiums hits home. The majority of Americans, especially those who are young and healthy and therefore have paid low premiums in the past, are seeing their health insurance premiums rise between 50% and 150%. Further, employers are cutting full-time workers back to part-time by reducing employees’ hours per week from 40 to 29 or less, to avoid having to provide those employees with expensive, Obamacare-compliant coverage. The “Affordable Care Act” has become anything but affordable for most people. 3. Large and small employers are cutting health insurance benefits. Obamacare expands the requirements for what all health insurance policies must cover. So it’s no mystery why premiums have risen: Americans now must pay for a host of features, whether they want to or not. For example, in my office, the women employees are all menopausal. Yet Obamacare requires our small-business health insurance policy to cover pregnancy and maternity care! That means our policy costs more. These higher premiums force employers to pass on the costs to employees (in the form of higher co-pays and deductibles) and/or customers (in the form of higher product costs). 2014 will bring even higher premiums for most individuals and businesses. To deal with this onslaught of rising costs, businesses have a series of bad options: fire or lay off workers, cut health insurance benefits for everyone in the company, or reduce full-time employees to part-time so they don’t qualify for health insurance benefits, as I mentioned above. Unfortunately, some businesses will be forced into the worst option of all: going out of business. 4. The employer-based health insurance policies that remain will have higher out-of-pocket costs for employees. Because businesses must pay more to purchase Obamacare-compliant plans, they will require employees to pay higher co-pays and deductibles before coverage begins. 5. Fewer types of health insurance policies can be offered under Obamacare. Many small-business plans and existing physician networks are being terminated due to the expanded coverage requirements under Obamacare. We just received notice that our own small-business plan is being terminated. Candidate and then President Obama promised, “You can keep your insurance plan.” Nope. 6. Many people cannot keep their doctors. Candidate Obama promised, “If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.” But many patients who like their doctors are being forced to find new ones due to changes in physician networks, as well as doctors leaving insurance plans to start fee-for-service or “concierge” practices. Sadly, when a patient is pushed out of a long-standing relationship with a physician who understands their medical history, medical outcomes often deteriorate. This is especially true for special-needs patients, who often fall between the cracks when doctors are pressured to see 40 or 50 patients a day in five-minute visits. 7. Further destruction of Medicare. In 2014, Medicare patients will discover several unwanted changes: higher premiums for their supplemental policies fewer types of Medicare supplement policies available more cutbacks in Medicare-covered services longer delays to see doctors, because many doctors are closing their doors to Medicare patients due to the cuts in reimbursements fewer cancer care specialists taking Medicare patients higher costs for hospital-based cancer treatments, as private offices with lower costs are closed due to reimbursement cutbacks fewer hospital-based surgeries being approved because as of October 2012, Obamacare rules incentivize hospitals (i.e., paid more by Medicare) to do fewer surgeries and procedures. Medicare patients who sign the Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN) agreeing to pay for services Medicare does not cover will find that they now have higher out-of-pocket costs to pay for these non-covered services. Patients over 80 are already finding reduced approvals for certain procedures and medicines. Expect to see more of this age-based rationing as the Medicare cuts increase over the next decade. 8. Loss of ownership of your medical records. Your doctors, hospitals, and other health professionals are being pressured to adopt electronic medical record systems and send patient information to the federal government’s medical database by 2015. If they don’t comply, they’ll be penalized with reduced payments for services. This means the government will own your personal, private information, and you have no say in the matter. I consider this a complete loss of your privacy, as well as a violation of the Constitution’s 5th Amendment “Takings” clause. 9. More waivers and exemptions for the political elites and Democrat cronies. The Obama Administration and its political appointee, HHS Secretary Sibelius, have granted over 1,000 waivers and special exemptions to various Democrat donors, political allies, unions, and others. Obama’s politically connected friends are the only Americans who won’t suffer under Obamacare’s onerous regulations, ballooning costs, and 20 new taxes. 10. On January 1, 2014, the Individual Mandate to purchase Obamacare-compliant health insurance goes into effect. “Mandate” may sound benign, but it carries the force of law. Those who do not comply face another Obamacare tax (as the Supreme Court defined it), though called a “penalty” by Democrats when they forced the healthcare law through Congress on a partisan vote. At the end of the day, Obamacare shifts a bigger burden onto taxpayers and increases the number of people on the dole. In other words, it pushes the US in the exact opposite direction it needs to go to solve its massive debt problems. The most serious problems of Obamacare, however, will be felt at the individual level. You’re going to wait longer to see a doctor, you’re going to pay more for fewer treatment options, and healthcare quality will deteriorate as doctors and hospitals go out of business. Obamacare seeks to replace the adaptability and efficiency of our free markets with heavy-handed government control and micromanaging by bureaucrats who don’t have a clue about what really helps patients. We need the opposite: patient-centered, free-market reforms. Such programs have been successfully implemented in states like Indiana and businesses like Whole Foods and Safeway. They used health savings accounts and other incentives to empower consumers to make their own medical spending decisions. It’s possible to reform and improve the broken payment system while keeping our excellent medical care and innovative atmosphere that relieves suffering and improves quality of life. Unfortunately, Obamacare is pushing our country in the wrong direction. Dr. Vliet writes as an independent practicing physician with medical practices in Tucson and Dallas focused on issues of endocrine aging in men and women from puberty to late life. Dr. Vliet is a registered political Independent, and is also medically independent of all health insurance contracts since 1986. Her allegiance is to and for patients. Dr. Vliet is the 2007 Voice of Women Honoree by the Arizona Foundation for Women for her pioneering work on the overlooked hormone connections in women’s health, and she is the author of six consumer books on health topics. She has appeared on nationally syndicated radio and TV shows discussing the healthcare law as well as a variety of health topics for women and men. Dr. Vliet was one of the speakers at the just-concluded 2013 Casey Research Summit. (Click here to pre-order the complete Summit Audio Collection and save $100 off the normal price. This discount offer ends tomorrow.) Dr. Vliet’s medical websites are www.herplace.com and www.InternationalHealthStrategiesLtd.com. Follow Dr. Vliet on twitter @healthandcentslast_img read more

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Dark Data Research Reveals Widespread Complacency in Driving Business Results and Career

first_img AIDark DataDark Data ReportfundingMarketing TechnologyNewsSplunkTRUE Global Intelligence Previous ArticleThe Trade Desk Partners with Samba TV to Unify Digital and TV Media Strategies for the World’s Largest AdvertisersNext ArticlePimcore Launches Data Hub To Strengthen Content-As-A-Service Capabilities For Enhanced Data Delivery and Consumption Survey Finds New Skill Sets and AI to Be the Future; Organizations Not Turning Massive Data Opportunity into Meaningful Business OutcomesSplunk Inc., delivering actions and outcomes from the world of data, released research that shows organizations are ignoring potentially valuable data and don’t have the resources they need to take advantage of it. The research reveals that although business executives recognize the value of using all of their data, more than half (55 percent) of an organization’s total data is “dark data,” meaning they either don’t know it exists or don’t know how to find, prepare, analyze or use it.“the organization that has the most data is going to win.”The State of Dark Data Report, built using research conducted by TRUE Global Intelligence and directed by Splunk, surveyed more than 1,300 global business managers and IT leaders about how their organizations collect, manage and use data. In an era where data is connecting devices, systems and people at unprecedented growth rates, the results show that while data is top of mind, action is often far behind.76 percent of respondents surveyed across the US, UK, France, Germany, China, Japan, and Australia agree “the organization that has the most data is going to win.”60 percent of respondents said that more than half of their organizations’ data is dark, and one-third of respondents say more than 75 percent of their organization’s data is dark.Business leaders say their top three obstacles to recovering dark data is the volume of data, followed by the lack of necessary skill sets and resources.More than half (56 percent) admit that “data-driven” is just a slogan in their organization.82 percent say humans are and will always be at the heart of AI.Marketing Technology News: Snap Inc. Names Kenny Mitchell Chief Marketing Officer“Data is hard to work with because it’s growing at an alarming rate and is hard to structure and organize. So, it’s easy for organizations to feel helpless in this chaotic landscape,” says Tim Tully, chief technology officer, Splunk. “I was pleased to see the opportunity people around the world attach to dark data, even though fewer than a third of those surveyed say they have the skills to turn data into action. This presents a tremendous opportunity for motivated leaders, professionals and employers to learn new skills and reach a new level of results. Splunk can help those organizations feel empowered to take control of identifying and using dark data.”Respondents are Slow to Seize Career and Leadership OpportunitiesWhile respondents understand the value of dark data, they admit they don’t have the tools, expertise or staff to take advantage of it. Plus, the majority of senior leaders say they are close enough to retirement that they aren’t motivated to become data-literate. Data is the future of work, but only a small percentage of professionals seem to be taking it seriously. Respondents agree there is no single answer, though the top solutions having potential included training more employees in data science and analytics, increasing funding for data wrangling, and deploying software to enable less technical employees to analyze the data for themselves.92 percent say they are “willing” to learn new data skills but only 57 percent are “extremely” or “very” enthusiastic to work more with data.69 percent said they were content to keep doing what they’re doing, regardless of the impact on the business or their career.More than half of respondents (53 percent) said they are too old to learn new data skills when asked what they were doing to educate themselves and their teams.66 percent cite lack of support from senior leaders as a challenge in gathering data and roughly one-in-five respondents (21 percent) cite lack of interest from organization leaders as a challenge.Marketing Technology News: Factual Launches Measurement Intelligence to Track Real-World Conversions and Optimize Campaigns Across New and Emerging Digital ChannelsAI is Believed to Be The Next Frontier for Data-Savvy OrganizationsGlobally, respondents believe AI will generally augment opportunities, rather than replace people. While the survey revealed that few organizations are using AI right now, a majority see its vast potential. For example, in a series of use cases including operational efficiency, strategic decision making, HR and customer experience, only 10 to 15 percent say their organizations are deploying AI for these use cases while roughly two-thirds see the potential value.A majority of respondents (71 percent) saw potential in employing AI to analyze data.73 percent think AI can make up for the skills gaps in IT.82 percent say humans are and will always be at the heart of AI and 72 percent say that AI is just a tool to solve business problems.Only 12 percent are using AI to guide business strategy and 61 percent expect their organization to increase its use of AI this way over the next five years.Regional Differences Fuel Range of Opinions: China Furthest Ahead in Understanding the Potential of Dark DataThe research also discovered some distinct differences in attitude and opinion between the seven countries polled. For example, French, German and Japanese respondents seem less concerned about the value of data skills to their careers, with affirmative answers roughly 25 percent lower on average, than their counterparts in other countries. Respondents in China overwhelmingly voice the most enthusiasm and confidence in AI but their current adoption is only slightly higher than the global average. (20 to 16 percent)Marketing Technology News: Mobile Is Key to Boosting Guest Experiences Say HoteliersAustralian respondents implied the lowest AI adoption rates among all countries surveyed with 43 percent saying AI is already – or will in the near future be – an important part of their organizations’ operations compared to the global average of 52 percent.Although China leads response rates on the value and impact of AI across the research, 93 percent of Chinese respondents also believe machines can never replace human qualities like curiosity, creativity and initiative – the highest of any country.Only 64 percent of French respondents think data is a central component of an organization’s success compared to 81 percent globally.Only 58 percent of German leaders think data will grow more valuable over the next decade compared to 71 percent globally.Nearly four out of ten people in Japan (38 percent) say they are excited about working with data, lagging behind the global response of 57 percent.39 percent of people in the United Kingdom strongly believe AI can make up for the skills gap versus only 27 percent globally. Dark Data Research Reveals Widespread Complacency in Driving Business Results and Career Growth PRNewswireMay 2, 2019, 6:31 pmMay 2, 2019 last_img read more

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Importio Hires Industry Leaders to Meet Web Data Integration Market Expansion with

first_imgWeb Data Integration leader brings on tenured team leads to drive Import.io’s market share in burgeoning industryImport.io, the leading Web Data Integration solution provider, announced the hiring of three key team members to meet the demands of the rapidly expanding Web Data Integration market. The company brought on a new VP of engineering, VP of worldwide sales and a VP of delivery and managed services to drive annual recurring revenue (ARR) in this multi-billion-dollar market.Import.io hired Masa Karahashi as its new VP of engineering. Previously, Karahashi has led engineering efforts for a variety of start-ups, such as Human API, 3VR and Promptu. He has also spent more than a decade in various executive positions running worldwide enterprise engineering organizations at Oracle and Siebel where he was instrumental in ensuring the successful production launches of some of the world’s largest CRM deployments.Marketing Technology News: Flipboard Appoints Advertising Industry Veteran David Bell As New Board MemberDixon Fiske has joined the Import.io team as VP of worldwide sales. Fiske has been in technology sales for more than 30 years, most recently with SOASTA (acquired by Akamai), Boundary (acquired by BMC), and Nimsoft (acquired by CA Technologies). Now at his ninth startup, Fiske looks to continue his track record of building successful sales organizations and driving company growth.Kevin Zachary has joined Import.io as its new VP of delivery and managed services. Zachary previously led professional services and customer success at Cloudera.  Prior to joining Cloudera, Zachary spent 14 years at IBM where he led various strategic delivery initiatives focused on data management and emerging technologies for open source big data, machine learning, and AI.Marketing Technology News: Introducing Acoustic: A New Marketing Cloud Bringing Humanity to AI-Powered Marketing“The Web Data Integration market is growing exponentially and will require top industry talent to meet the heightened demand from customers,” said Gary Read, CEO of Import.io. “These roles are especially critical to fill with the expansion of our managed service business. We now have best-in-class sales leaders, a delivery team that can manage massive data projects and an engineering team that can streamline the development and delivery of vital WDI solutions that meet the needs of a demanding market.”“I’m looking forward to building a world-class sales organization here at Import.io to serve its billion-dollar market,” said Fiske. “We are transforming the way we do business to respond to prospect needs in an agile manner, expanding and closing deals quickly and efficiently. I’m eager to drive a companywide sales-focused culture to continue delivering solutions at scale.”Marketing Technology News: New TimeTrade Schedule-A-Demo Solution Helps B2B Software Companies Increase Inbound Lead-to-Meeting Conversion by 4X AIClouderacrmData Integration MarketGary ReadImport.ioNewsSales and Delivery Previous ArticleWalmart and Etsy Integrations Receive Major Upgrades in SureDone’s Multichannel E-Commerce PlatformNext ArticleRelationship Marketing Hub Optimove Hires New VP of R&D Import.io Hires Industry Leaders to Meet Web Data Integration Market Expansion with Enhanced Engineering, Sales and Delivery Globe Newswire5 days agoJuly 18, 2019 last_img read more

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Tellius and Snowflake Partner to Deliver CloudNative Augmented Analytics at Scale

first_imgTellius and Snowflake Customers Benefit from Modern AI-Powered Analytics Leveraging the Data Warehouse Built for the CloudTellius, a leading provider of AI-powered augmented analytics software, today announced a partnership with Snowflake, Inc, the data warehouse built for the cloud. Through the partnership, the Tellius Search and AI-Powered Analytics platform is certified to natively connect to the Snowflake data warehouse, allowing customers to discover insights at scale without worrying about analytics performance.Organizations leverage Tellius as a fast, simplified, and collaborative approach for business users, data analysts, citizen data scientists, and data engineers to visualize enterprise data using natural language and voice, discover insights assisted by AI, and automate machine learning across all their business data.“With our partners at Snowflake, we are delivering cloud-native data analytics to accelerate business impact from AI and machine learning,” said Ajay Khanna, Founder and CEO of Tellius. “Business users and data professionals can now focus on deriving insights across their multiple data sources and enterprise applications and on taking action based on automated recommendations without compromising on analytics performance.”The Snowflake Data Warehouse is a modern cloud data-warehouse-as-a-service offering. Snowflake’s ability to analyze data from diverse sources along with automatic tuning and scaling removes the headache of monitoring and fine-tuning data warehouse manually. By integrating Tellius natively with Snowflake, users can now get exceptional performance on data insights of any scale without worrying about maintaining the data warehouse infrastructure.“Our customers need cutting-edge analytics to get meaningful insights to their critical data questions,” said Hardik Chheda, Head of Product at Tellius. “With our integration with Snowflake, they can now build modern business intelligence and predictive analytics applications at scale.”Tellius + Snowflake advantages:In-database Augmented Analytics – Analyze petabytes of live data securely without moving it out of Snowflake’s data warehouse.Insights Across Data Sources – Discover insights from a multitude of sources on Snowflake data warehouse by analyzing disparate structured and unstructured data.Blazing Fast Data Collaboration – Democratize data access across your analytics team without any worrying about performance or IT maintenance.Tellius for Snowflake is now available. To learn more, schedule a demonstration of the Tellius Search and AI-Powered Analytics Platform. Tellius and Snowflake Partner to Deliver Cloud-Native Augmented Analytics at Scale PRNewswire4 days agoJuly 22, 2019 Augmented AnalyticscloudNewsSnowflakeTellius Previous ArticleThe Wild Releases Oculus Quest Support, Opening The Door To Team-Wide VR Collaboration For Architecture and DesignNext ArticleDods Group Plc Acquires Meritgroup Limited, a B2B Data and Technology Specialistlast_img read more

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Fivehundred fifty million barrels of oil discovered off Ghana coast

first_img Explore further A ‘new outlook’ for the economy Ghana flooding kills 34 during heavy rains Norway’s Aker Energy on Thursday said it had discovered oil in commercial quantities off Ghana, which the government welcomed as a potential boost to the economy. The oil and gas operator said exploratory drilling indicated an “estimated 450-550 million barrels of oil equivalent (mmboe)” in the Pecan field, 166 kilometres (100 miles) off Takaradi.Further exploration could increase total volumes to 600-1,000 mmboe, the company said in a statement.Ghana’s government said the announcement was “good news” that could bring “a new outlook to the economy” and alternative funding for social projects in the future.Aker Energy began operating the Pecan field last year. It holds a 50 percent stake. Others include Russian energy firm Lukoil and the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation.Ghana first discovered oil in 2007 and became a producer in 2010, helping to speed up the rate of economic growth. It is believed to have five to seven billion barrels in reserves.The resolution of a long-standing maritime boundary dispute between Ghana and neighbouring Ivory Coast sparked predictions the country would see an oil boom.President Nana Akufo-Addo said the favourable ruling opened up “possibilities of development, progress and prosperity”, which would help boost funding for schools, hospitals and roads.center_img Citation: Five-hundred fifty million barrels of oil discovered off Ghana coast (2019, January 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-five-hundred-fifty-million-barrels-oil.html © 2019 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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