Repercussions from death of a woman of power

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan ClarksonEven President George W. Bush, at vacation rest, again, was required to slough off evident fatigue and emerge from retreat to express official sorrow in front of media cameras. And this was over the assassination of a woman who is not now even in the Pakistani Cabinet, and indeed, has not been in power for more than a decade. So, why all the fuss about Bhutto? What, after all – to be callous about it – is one more body made dead by terrorism? To offer some perspective, please understand that most Americans know very little about nuclear-powered Pakistan. But we had better start learning. American tax money, to the tune of $25 billion since 9-11, has been helping keep in power that country’s “president,” Pervez Musharraf, a military man. What’s surprising is that so little of this is widely known here. Yet the suicide-bombing assassination of Bhutto has swept across America as story number one. Here is my best guess: Americans are increasingly interested in the topic of the prospect or reality of women in power. For many here, the Bhutto story is about a woman of power more than about the internal politics of Pakistan. PERHAPS it was the ever-present white scarf, wrapped around her head, as if shouting to us that a woman in her particular culture might not have it so easy, especially if she wanted to change things. Or perhaps it was the simple drama of history exerting a powerful pull that was tugging her back from exile to her native Pakistan, even as the severe dangers of such a return seemed daily more evident. Or perhaps the tense and ultimately tragic saga of Benazir Bhutto, facing political crisis in her homeland, attracted America’s attention precisely because of its own impending need to make a major political decision about a high-profile woman of ambition. Whatever the reason, the sound of the pistol bullets that have left Bhutto dead have resounded all over the world – and not the least here in the United States. The Bhutto assassination is a big American news story, bigger than almost any story out of Asia in recent memory. After all, there aren’t that many women of power around the world for us to study. In Argentina there is new President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner. Her comely picture appears just about every second or third day in American publications. Perhaps they are thinking of her as the new Evita. German Chancellor Angela Merkel gets some Western press, though not as much as Fernandez, perhaps because she is not as photogenic, though Germany is more important than Argentina. Elsewhere in Asia, there is President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, the 14th president of the Philippines and the country’s second woman leader (Cory Aquino, 1986 to 1992, was the first). Like Benazir Bhutto when she was last prime minister (1993-96), Arroya has been hit with corruption allegations, too. The Bush administration was aware of the negative talk about Bhutto, but was desperate to fix the leaking dam that has become Pakistan. Musharraf has been losing a lot of legitimacy with the sacking of Supreme Court judges and the widespread jailing of lawyers and journalists. The opposing Pakistan People’s Party, with Bhutto returning from exile, suddenly offered a way for Washington to hedge its Pakistan bet should Mursharraf’s government come apart. The quick-drying glue of an externally imposed coalition regime would be slathered on Pakistan to seal the government from further sliding – and perhaps even falling into the hands of you-know-what kind of people. Bhutto, whether in alliance with Musharraf or not, was supposed to be Plan B, but now Benazir is no more. Benazir was murdered by an extremist madman, while Musharraf watched many miles away. Could he have done more to prevent it? Under the circumstances, that does not seem an unfair question to ask. Benazir was the eldest child of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, who founded the Pakistan People’s Party and was president and later prime minister of Pakistan from 1971 to 1977. She always doffed that headscarf, to be sure, but she was no madam of the madrassas. She had been educated at Radcliffe and Harvard (majoring in comparative government, a rather useful subject-matter in Asia), had topped it off with a fancy degree from Oxford, and so was generally regarded as one smart cookie. In recent months, her PPP looked to be gaining sympathy in Pakistan since hardly anyone trusted the Musharraf government (and some of those who openly expressed their distrust wound up in jail.) And so in the world’s eyes, there was the U.S., with all its oft-proclaimed ideals about democracy, once again in bed with a military strongman because of the crisis of the moment. It would be no surprise if Bhutto had been making Musharraf very uncomfortable indeed. But now, no more. UCLA professor Tom Plate is a board member of the Burkle Center on International Relations, a member of the Pacific Council on International Policy, and the author of six books.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Continue reading

Prep Football: League play kicks into gear in both Big 5, Little 3 this weekend

first_imgFortuna head coach Mike Benbow has routinely talked about how difficult it is to play in Crescent City no matter what kind of Del Norte team his Huskies are facing every season.That annual trip north is now here.Fortuna — which hasn’t lost since its season opener in late-August — opens up the second half of its schedule with one of its most difficult road tests of the 2017 season, traveling two hours up U.S. Highway 101 to face Del Norte in a meeting of the Big 5’s two 1-0 teams.Fortuna (4-1 …last_img

Continue reading

Busy week for South Africa’s anti-poaching units

first_img15 April 2014Last week was one of the busiest on record for anti-poaching units in South Africa’s Kruger National Park, with three heavily armed groups of suspected rhino poachers being detected and eight arrests being made.The eight arrests included those of two South African National Parks (SANParks) employees. According to spokesperson Reynold Thakhuli, the two SANParks men appeared on Wednesday in the White River Magistrate’s Court, where their case was remanded to 16 April for a formal bail application.Thakhuli said most of last week’s incidents took place in the southern part of the park, in areas such as Crocodile Bridge, Kingfisherspruit, Tshokwane and Stolsnek.On Thursday, he said, rangers from Crocodile Bridge arrested two suspected poachers, believed to be Zimbabwean nationals, as they were leaving the park, recovering a G3 military type rifle along with a silencer and ammunition.On Friday, rangers from the Kingfisherspruit area apprehended another two suspected poachers, arresting one while recovering a .458 rifle, silencer, ammunition and poaching equipment. The second suspect managed to escape arrest.Tshokwane rangers apprehended a further two suspects on Saturday, making one arrest and recovering a .375 hunting rifle, ammunition and poaching equipment. The second suspect managed to escape back to Mozambique.And on Sunday, in Stolsnek, rangers apprehended a group of five suspected poachers, arresting two of them with the help of SANParks Airwing and canine units. Thakhuli said the hunt for the remaining three suspects, who managed to escape, was still on.“This is a clear indication that resilience and patience pays off, and we are grateful that no lives were lost during an encounter with these heavily armed suspected poachers.”He said the anti-poaching units are ready for the coming long weekend, with many deployments routes, particularly in poaching hot-spots, being plotted out.“We will be ready and waiting for them, and we would like to request the support and cooperation of all members of society in identifying and reporting suspicious behavior that could lead to the apprehension and conviction of these criminals.”The public can report incidents of poaching and give tip-offs to the anonymous tip-off lines 0800 205 005, 08600 10111 or Crime Line on 32211.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Continue reading

Ohio Beef Expo enjoyed success in 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) hosted more than 30,000 participants and attendees at the Ohio Expo Center in March for the 2018 Ohio Beef Expo.The Expo provides an annual opportunity for those in the cattle industry in Ohio, and across the nation, to learn and enhance their operations through a three-day trade show, cattle sales, youth events and educational seminars.Five breed shows and two breed parades were featured Friday, as well as numerous breed displays representing the Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Maine-Anjou, Miniature Hereford, Murray Grey, Red Angus, Simmental and Shorthorn breeds. The Genetic Pathway, located in the Showbloom breed’s barn, had the industry’s most popular sires and donor prospects on display throughout the weekend. Six breed sales brought in large crowds on Saturday, March 17, selling 374 lots with an average price of $2,864 and a gross of $1,197,125.Two recipients were honored with the Friend of the Expo Award for their contribution to the Expo’s annual success. Linde Sutherly, New Carlisle, and Nancy Snook, Caldwell, were both honored. Sutherly is the owner of Linde’s Livestock Photos and a huge supporter of OCA youth programs. She has been the official Expo photographer since 2014. Snook has been actively involved in the Expo since her family participated in the first Ohio Beef Expo in 1988. Since then, Snook has served on the junior show committee, facilitated the judging contest and most recently taught youth beef quality assurance.Friday was Youth Day, sponsored by Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. The day began with the judging contest where over 450 youth participated. First place winners included: Beau Johnson, Gallia County (Junior Division); Wally Minges, Butler County (Senior Division); Brooke Simon, Hannah Lang, Ethan Davies and Samantha VanVorhis, Wood County (Junior Team); and Katelyn Cowdrey, Adrianne Moran and Amber Storey, Brown County (Senior Team).In addition, nearly 500 youth participated in beef quality assurance training. Junior exhibitors could also take advantage of two fitting and clipping demonstrations and a welcome pizza party.Events continued Saturday with over 500 exhibitors in the showmanship competition, sponsored by Cattle Visions, LLC and ShowBloom. The top finishers in showmanship included first place in Novice Showmanship: Caroline Winter from Pickaway County, Beginner Showmanship: Carly Sanders from Highland County, Junior Showmanship: Beau Johnson from Gallia County, Intermediate Showmanship: Allison Davis from Carroll County, and Senior Showmanship: Kyle Piscione from Medina County.The junior portion wrapped up Sunday with the market animal show and heifer show with a combined total of nearly 900 head from across the state. During the junior show, Natalie Wagner, Brown County, was awarded the $1,000 Saltwell Expo scholarship, funded by the Saltwell Western Store and Ohio Beef Expo.During the event, OCA volunteers signed up and renewed nearly 200 memberships including NCBA members. Any current or new OCA member had the opportunity to win some great prizes. The OCA County Affiliate of Darke County won the County Affiliate Recruitment Contest drawing and received their choice of a grill or set of Tru-Test Scales sponsored by the Ohio Corn Marketing Program.The Expo featured a trade show featuring more than 130 vendors from 17 states. Cashman’s Equipment was selected as the premier large booth exhibitor, Weaver Leather Livestock was selected as the premier small booth exhibitor and Lance’s Trailer Sales was selected as the premier outdoor exhibitor. An educational seminar, Accessing Current and Future Cattle Markets, jointly sponsored by AllFlex USA, Inc. and United Producers, Inc. took place on Saturday, March 17.A complete list of the event’s sponsors can be found at www.ohiobeefexpo.com. The dates for the 2019 Ohio Beef Expo are March 15-17. Visit www.ohiobeefexpo.com for more information as well as complete coverage of the 2018 event.last_img read more

Continue reading

Modi urged to make reality match Make in India hype

first_imgThousands of people and lion mascots swarmed the weekend opening of a “Make in India” drive to attract foreign direct investment, pitched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi as “the biggest brand that India has ever created”.The week-long event, the boldest since Modi launched the initiative to emulate China’s export miracle back in 2014, got off to an inauspicious start when a huge fire engulfed the stage at a cultural event on Sunday. Nobody was hurt.Even as the Make in India hype scales new heights, some bosses questioned Modi’s delivery on promises to make it easier to do business, while marketing experts cautioned against creating unrealistic expectations.”When you over-communicate and you under-deliver, the biggest risk is that you begin to lose trust,” said Chandramouli Nilakantan, CEO of Blue Lotus Communications, a branding and public relations consultancy.On buzz alone, the effort got off to a great start, with the prime ministers of Sweden and Finland attending Saturday’s gala opening hosted by Modi.On Sunday, delegates thronged the 10 pavilions erected for the event in Mumbai, India’s financial capital. Around 2,500 foreign and 8,000 domestic companies were expected to attend, organisers said.Yet on the ground, the experience of businesses is more prosaic. Twenty months after Modi swept to power with a promise of growth and jobs for India’s 1.3 billion people, executives say more needs to be done, including improving infrastructure.More pressingly, key legislation such as a goods and services tax and land acquisition bill are stuck in parliament, just as global competitors such as Vietnam step up their own reform efforts.”Make in India is a great initiative and has created a lot of positive sentiments,” Vikas Agarwal, general manager of mobile phone maker OnePlus in India, told Reuters.”Now the government needs to follow up with policies. That includes providing custom duty and export incentives, tax rationalisation and removal of ambiguous land acquisition policies.”MAJOR WINSMake In India has scored major wins, including a pledge by Taiwan’s Foxconn to invest $5 billion in a new electronics manufacturing facility.That has helped foreign direct investment to nearly double to $59 billion last year, the seventh highest level in the world, according to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.Yet in critical aspects, India remains far behind its goals.The proportion of manufacturing to gross domestic product has been stuck at around 17 percent for five years, below the government’s goal to ramp it up to 25 percent, according to the Boston Consulting Group.India has only created 4 million manufacturing jobs since 2010, according to Boston Consulting. At the current rate, India may only create 8 million jobs by 2022, well below the government’s goal of 100 million.Professor Ravi Aron, a US-based expert in manufacturing, said India was ill-suited for a Chinese-style export boom, because it lacked the infrastructure and the skills for its exports to compete internationally.”It should not be called ‘Make in India’ but ‘Make In Spite of India’,” said Aron, of Johns Hopkins University, advising the Indian government to scale back its ambitions and focus on its growing domestic market.($1 = 68.2750 Indian rupees)last_img read more

Continue reading

4 children of a family among 5 killed in Coxs Bazar landslides

first_img4 children of a family among 5 killed in Cox’s Bazar landslides. Photo : Prothom AloAt least four children of a family among five were killed in separate landslides in Cox’s Bazar district early Wednesday.Witnesses said three daughters and a son of a Saudi expatriate, Md Jamal Hossain, were killed in a landslide in Bancha Mia Ghona area of Cox’s Bazar municipality.The deceased are Marzia Akter, 14, Kafia Aktar, 10, Khairunnesa, 6, and Abdul Hai, 10.Local people said Jamal Hossain’s wife Chinuara was injured in the incident.Abdullah Mamun and Gias Uddin, residents of the municipality, told Prothom Alo that a 70-80 feet hill collapsed on the house of Jamal Hossain around 6:00am.All of the family members were asleep then, the locals added. Locals, according to the witnesses, rescued the injured and sent them to Cox’s Bazar Sadar Hospital where doctors declared the children dead.In Ramu upazila’s Mithaichhari area, a landslide killed another child.The deceased is Morshed Alam, 6, son of a certain Zafar Alam.Cox’s Bazar Sadar Model police station officer-in-charge Farid Uddin Khandakar has confirmed the casualties in the incidents this morning.The bodies of the deceased are kept in the hospital morgue, the OC added.last_img read more

Continue reading

The Asian Roots Of Umami – The Fifth Taste Central To Thanksgiving

first_img Share Twitter User @umamistreetfoodThanksgiving is perhaps the quintessential American holiday. The fourth Thursday in November provides a moment to reflect on the good fortune of the past year and a chance to share a meal with friends and family. Iconic images of Thanksgiving place America’s native bird, the turkey, at the center of the feast, as are corn, pumpkins and other indigenous species. Unlike other holidays including Valentines Day, Halloween and even Christmas, though, the flavors of Thanksgiving are savory rather than sweet. And just as there is a history to the Thanksgiving menu, so too, there is a history to the holiday’s primary taste: umami. Most Americans are taught, although this is changing, that there are four basic tastes: sweet, sour, salty and bitter. However, more than a century ago, the Japanese chemist Kikunea Ikeda posited a fifth primary taste, which he called umami. In an effort to describe this new taste in 1912, he suggested: “An attentive taster will find … something common in the complicated taste of asparagus, tomato, cheese, and meat, which is quite peculiar and cannot be classified under any of the above mentioned qualities sweet, sour, bitter, or briny. It is usually so faint and overshadowed by other stronger tastes, that it is often difficult to recognize it unless the attention is specially directed towards it. “The existence of umami as a basic taste like sweet, sour, salty or bitter seems “new” to the American palate. But in my research on US food systems in the 20th century, I’ve found that the recognition of umami followed the spread of Asian cuisine in the US decades ago. A taste is bornIn order to better explain this subtle taste, Ikeda attempted to describe the difference between umami as it is found in food and its pure form. By way of analogy, he explained: “Had we nothing sweeter than carrots or milk, our idea of the quality of “sweet” would be just as indistinct as it is in the case of this peculiar quality. Just as honey and sugar gave us so clear a notion of what sweet is, the salts of (the amino acid) glutamic acid are destined to give us an equally definite idea of this peculiar taste quality. “Based on over two years of research, he was convinced that another – “new” – basic taste existed. He found umami in “fish, meat and so forth” or in foods with high-protein content. Ikeda’s “discovery” of umami was based as much on his mastery of physical chemistry as it was on his own taste experiences and the flavors endemic to Japanese foods. Japanese cuisine, more than European and Eurocentric cuisines, is centered on umami as a foundational element and is a key taste in the Japanese palate. The two foods Ikeda focused on to extract glutamic acid were konbu and bonito, the key elements in dashi – a savory broth ubiquitous throughout Japanese cooking. As it happens, both konbu (a dried brown kelp) and katsuobushi (bonito or skipjack tuna which is fermented, dried, smoked and flaked) contain large amounts of glutamic acid. In fact, miso soup, a twice-daily habit in most Japanese households even today, is a combination of two strong umami flavors, dashi and miso (a fermented soy paste). Ikeda also singled out soy sauce as a food that amplifies umami. In particular, soy sauce, with its high salt and glutamic acid content, was an excellent example of how salt intensified the taste of umami. As research in umami took hold in the second half of the 20th century, scientists found that umami was far more complex than any of the other basic tastes. One of the first major breakthroughs was the discovery that compounds other than glutamic acid produce umami. For example, both MSG – a combination of salt and glutamic acid – and other acids each produce distinct umami flavors. But when they are combined, the perception of umami is more than the sum of its parts. No other basic taste has this capability to ratchet up taste perception. Getting to know umami in the USIkeda’s and the Japanese palate was trained to experience umami, unlike palates in either Europe or the United States. By the end of the Vietnam War, though, shifting immigration patterns to the United States included more East Asians from Japan, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, China and South Korea. These immigrants brought a variety of new cultural influences to the US, particularly on the West Coast. By the mid-1980s, when Japan Inc dominated headlines and was thought to threaten American prosperity, Chinese restaurants were more common than Italian ones, and sushi, whether loved or reviled, defined Japanese food for most Americans. Immigration and assimilation of East Asian flavors into American cuisine as well as a plethora of industrial foods that incorporated glutamates made umami a far more common taste and altered the American taste landscape and the American palate in the late 20th century. Eating soy sauce, tofu, fish sauce and other foods high in glutamates not only integrated East Asian flavors into the American palate but also wove those communities into America’s social fabric through the sense of taste. It took until the early 2000s for the scientific community to recognize umami as the fifth taste. So as you are eating your Thanksgiving turkey with gravy and relishing all the side dishes, such as mushrooms, brussel sprouts or stuffing, that make the meal delicious, remember the savory taste of umami only became obvious once Americans assimilated the flavors of distant lands into their everyday lives. That’s something for which we can all be thankful. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article here: http://theconversation.com/the-asian-roots-of-umami-the-fifth-taste-central-to-thanksgiving-fare-50699.last_img read more

Continue reading