Silva denies Malcom interest

first_imgEverton boss Marco Silva says there is no truth to the rumours he wants to sign Barcelona winger Malcom this month.The Premier League side brought in Andre Gomes on loan and Lucas Digne in a £19.5million deal from the Catalans in the previous transfer window, with both players proving sound additions to Silva’s side.Reports have suggested Malcom is the latest Barca fringe player to be targeted by the Toffees, the Brazilian having started only one game in LaLiga since a €42million move from Bordeaux last July. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? However, Silva insists there is no substance to the talk around the 21-year-old, telling a news conference: “No, no. Nothing.”Silva made it clear he will not put pressure on Everton to invest in the playing squad this month simply because of a poor run of form, which has seen them win just one of their last eight Premier League games and lose four of their previous five.”We cannot change every week our idea and philosophy as a club if you win two games or you don’t win two games,” he said. “The last result was not good enough for us, but it was a moment and we are capable of changing things for us again and showing our quality. “Not because of that will we change everything in our ideas. Not because of that will I come here and say, ‘we need this, and this, and this, and this’. We know what we can do or not. Let’s see what is possible.”Silva could be prepared to allow James McCarthy and Oumar Niasse to leave, with the players linked with West Brom and Crystal Palace respectively, but there is yet to be any major development in either deal.”I understand the moment. Now is the moment these rumours come to the table. But [there is] nothing new,” he said.”We don’t put more to be loaned or whatever. I want them focused on our squad and to be ready to play.”Until now, the decisions I already take, you know what they are. Even, like you know, the last moments were really busy for us. The time we had between [games] was to prepare for the next.”last_img read more

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GALLERY Students take lifechanging journey through southern Africa

Eighteen hours in ‘The Beast’ was just the start.A colossal bus ride through the uneven roads of southern Africa is not what most students would think of when they ponder experiential learning at Brock University. However, on the Brock Abroad: Namibia program, 18 hours in the all-terrain ‘beast’ bus was just the beginning of what would prove to be a life-changing experience.Launched in 2007, the annual Africa journey is one of several experiential learning programs offered by Brock International Services, in which participants learn about local academics, business and culture, while participating in a variety of activities and workshops. ‘The Beast,’ a vehicle from Wadadee Guest House, took the team everywhere, including an 18-hour drive from Cape Town, South Africa, to Windhoek, Namibia.This spring, 21 Brock students and their co-leaders flew out on April 26 for a month-long odyssey that began in Cape Town, South Africa.  While there, the group visited Robben Island — where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned before the fall of apartheid — and learned more about the townships that surround the city. The group also spent time learning about the fight to end apartheid, and the unique struggle Namibia faced in gaining its independence.From Cape Town, the students boarded ‘The Beast’ for the 1,400-kilometre bus ride to the Namibian capital, Windhoek, where they participated in a wide array of hands-on experiential opportunities.One of the program’s goals is to have participants identify and understand the challenges and opportunities faced in the host community, and how they relate to communities in Canada. “It’s through the vehicle of volunteering, visiting important cultural sites and museums, and speaking with local community partners that participants learn,” said Christina Bosilo, co-leader of the trip and manager of international learning programs in Brock International Services.The students met this important goal by working alongside several local organizations, including the Bernard Nordkamp Centre (BNC) in Katutura, which provides after-school programming for local children. At the BNC the team provided leadership training for older children as well as wellness-based activities for younger participants.But Child and Youth Studies student Madeline Pontone was quick to point out that the important lessons being learned were not exclusive to the youngsters in the classroom.“Getting to live and volunteer in the community of Katutura provided a level of immersion that fostered deep reflection and learning, something that is difficult to achieve at home,” she said. For Janet Westbury, experiential education co-ordinator for graduate programs in Brock’s Faculty of Applied Health Sciences and the trip’s other co-leader, these pivotal interactions created the a unique legacy for those on the journey.“It’s important that it’s not just about what we taught, but also what they taught us,” she said. “We learned from the leaders in the communities.”The team also spent time painting local schools and took part in excursions which showed them the natural beauty of the country.“The landscape, it’s stunning and ever-changing,” said Westbury. “You don’t want to miss anything outside the window. Namibia has a huge diversity in a relatively small package.”From sandboarding in the dunes to taking the children from the BNC to a local giraffe sanctuary, the group experienced a huge cross-section of Namibia’s culture and landscape in a relatively short amount of time.For Child and Youth Studies student Carley Kent, the well-rounded nature of the trip has been life changing.“It may sound cliché,” she said, “but my experience in southwest Africa has forever changed me as a person.”For Westbury, the month-long trip seemed to fly by, and all too quickly the team was on its way back to Canada — but not before they had grown in ways that seemed unimaginable before they set off.“A co-curricular trip like this focuses on growing our students personally,” she said.“Our whole team chose to be present in each moment of the trip, and for this reason they will come home with a new awareness of the day-to-day realities of those living on the other side of the world. But even more importantly, they will bring to Canada a full slate of invaluable lessons to share about the beautiful Namibian culture and hospitality that we were greeted with every day.”To hear more about the Brock Abroad: Namibia Program there will be a lunch and learn panel event in the Thistle 253 e-classroom on Wednesday, June 14 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.If you have more questions about the program, or wish to attend the lunch and learn, e-mail studyabroad@brocku.ca read more

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