Brett McMurphy Calls Ohio State’s Latest Move “Bush League”

first_imgTwo Ohio State football helmetsNEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: Ezekiel Elliott #15 of the Ohio State Buckeye helmet is seen on the sidelines prior to the start of the game during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Ohio State confirmed today that Texas head coach Tom Herman, formerly an assistant with the Buckeyes under Urban Meyer, was the other assistant coach at a Florida strip club with Zach Smith.Some in the sports media have criticized Ohio State’s decision to confirm that the other coach was Herman, although earlier reports had already made this news public.“The fact that Ohio State released this shows the pettiness of this school trying to assassinate the character of Tom Herman, who has absolutely nothing to do with Urban Meyer,” ESPN’s Paul Finebaum said on First Take. “Frankly, I think Urban Meyer owes Tom Herman the national championship because if Herman was not on that staff and if he hadn’t dealt with Cardale Jones the way he did after the first two quarterbacks were injured, I’m not sure Urban Meyer would have that national championship at Ohio State.”Brett McMurphy appears to agree with Finebaum.The Stadium reporter said on a Texas podcast today that he thinks it was a “bush league” move.“I don’t think it’d be a major issue with the NCAA,” he said. “At worse, it would be a secondary violation.”Reporter @Brett_McMurphy tells “On Second Thought” podcast it was “bush league of Ohio State to confirm Tom Herman’s identity” as other coach w/ Zach Smith at strip club. “I don’t think it’d be a major issue with the NCAA,” he said. “At worse, it would be a secondary violation.”— Kirk Bohls (@kbohls) August 29, 2018Texas has reportedly declined to publicly comment on the Herman news. Herman was the offensive coordinator at Ohio State for multiple seasons before taking the Houston job.last_img read more

Continue reading

UN commission agrees on safety principles for genetically modified foods

The 165-member “Codex Alimentarius Commission” – a subsidiary body of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) – has agreed in principle that the safety of food derived from genetically modified organisms (GMO) should be tested and approved by governments prior to entering the market. In particular, GMO foods should be tested for their potential to cause allergic reactions, the two agencies said.”This is the first global step toward the safety assessment of genetically modified foods,” said WHO Director-General Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland. “International agreement on how to perform risk assessment of genetically modified foods will help all countries, especially developing countries,” she added.The Commission, which tomorrow wraps up a week-long session in Geneva, also approved a series of new maximum levels of environmental contaminants, particularly lead, cadmium, and aflatoxin, found in food such as fruit juices, cereals, and milk.”The work of the Codex Commission on toxic substances is particularly important given the long-term health risks for consumers, especially children,” said Alan Randell, the body’s Secretary. “Nevertheless there is more work to do and the Commission will continue to work on the issue.”The Codex meeting also agreed to new guidelines for organic livestock production. According to these guidelines, organic livestock farming should aim to use natural breeding methods, minimize stress in animals, prevent disease, and progressively eliminate the use of certain chemical veterinary drugs, including antibiotics. Animals should mainly be fed with high quality organic feed, not meat and bone meal, although fish and milk products are acceptable. The use of growth hormones is not permitted.While Codex standards, guidelines and recommendations are voluntary, they are recognized by the World Trade Organization as reference points in international trade disputes, FAO and WHO said. read more

Continue reading