Brock researcher Jennifer Rowsell renewed as Canada Research Chair

Jennifer RowsellAn article in a popular magazine reported recently that excessive video game-playing accounts for boys’ “underachievement” in reading and writing.But Jennifer Rowsell says her research on the use of new media in the classroom tells a different story.“Boys and girls are creative. They’re interested and voracious readers and, what is more, they do so many other sophisticated things that weren’t done a decade ago,” says Rowsell, director of Brock University’s Centre for Multiliteracies, The Reading Clinic and professor in the Faculty of Education.During her five years as Canada Research Chair in Multiliteracies, Rowsell has pursued a number of projects that explore how rapidly developing technologies and new communicational practices can teach children skills and impart information in new and exciting ways.For instance, with the Minecraft project, a collaborative research project with Rob Simon at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Rowsell came to discover that creating new worlds within this incredibly popular video game has enabled students to gain knowledge and skills.“I interviewed a young man who created a whole art deco world,” Rowsell says. “It required him to do research on the Internet about art deco, about aesthetics in the 1920s, about the historical time period during when art deco flourished.“It may seemingly be that students are playing this video game, but actually they’re going out and doing a lot of extensive reading on the kinds of things that inform design processes that they are engaged in.”She gives another example of a group of girls who used characters from the movie Frozen to write about themselves and conduct research on sibling relationships.“The arguments across all of the research projects is that, when you actually find out what students love and what they do outside of school, and then you use those technologies, then you start to make school more permeable, more of a contemporary space driven by interest,” Rowsell explains. “Students exhibit motivation and interest when they are motivated by what they love.”In turn, Rowsell says educators can capitalize on this interest by “harnessing their interest to schooling topics, such as making short films or bringing Minecraft into the classroom.“So, using the example of the young male student, teachers can say, ‘OK, we will talk about Minecraft, but then we will move over and talk about art deco, and then we’ll move into studying a novel that was written during the age of art deco.’”The federal government’s Canada Research Chairs program announced recently that Rowsell was among those across the country getting their chair positions renewed.“Holding a Canada Research Chair is an incredible gift,” she says. “I feel privileged and grateful at the same time. It’s absorbing – I love it.”In addition to the Minecraft Project, which studied the classroom use of ebooks, iBooks, apps and the Minecraft video game, Rowsell’s other projects include:• Crayons and iPads, documenting the impact of iPad technology on children’s creativity and output (principal investigator is Deb Harwood)• Community Arts Zone, which brings into schools drama, movement, photography, music and play-building, expanding the repertoire of children’s literacy; and• Remaking Families, which studies how families use photographs, Facebook and other technologies to tell their family stories (principal investigator is CRC Andrea Doucet and co-investigator is Diane Collier).During her next five-year term, Rowsell says she aims to take her projects a step further. “I would like to work more actively with the community, with more schools, to bring into the classroom these multi-modal approaches that will range from using iPads to creative expression of the arts.”Rowsell plans to arrange for media professionals to teach students the “nuts and bolts” of various aspects of media. She is also involved in a Western University-led research project to investigate the introduction of iCloud technology into schools.The Canada Research Chairs program invests approximately $265 million per year to attract and retain some of the world’s most accomplished and promising minds. Chair holders aim to achieve research excellence in engineering and the natural sciences, health sciences, humanities, and social sciences. read more

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Lindsay leads Denver to 3rd straight win 2410 over Bengals

CINCINNATI — Rookie Phillip Lindsay ran for a career-high 157 yards and a pair of touchdowns Sunday as the Denver Broncos adapted to a windy afternoon and got their third straight victory, 24-10 over the Cincinnati Bengals.The Broncos (6-6) have emerged from their bye week and knocked off the Chargers, Steelers and Bengals to stay in contention in December.Denver handled an unseasonably warm day: 66 degrees at kickoff with wind gusts up to 40 mph that redirected kicks and throws. Case Keenum completed 12 of 21 passes for 151 yards, including a 30-yard touchdown pass to Courtland Sutton.Lindsay ran for TDs of 6 yards and 65 yards — the longest of his career — as Denver got up 21-3 in the third quarter and closed it out against the unraveling Bengals (5-7), who lost for the sixth time in seven games. Lindsay’s two touchdowns matched his career high.Lindsay also became the first undrafted rookie in Broncos history to top 1,000 yards rushing and receiving in a season.The Bengals’ season continues to implode under 16th-year coach Marvin Lewis, who has also co-ordinated the defence in the last three losses. The crowd of 44,392 was the smallest at Paul Brown Stadium since 2011.The Bengals lost Andy Dalton to a torn ligament in his passing thumb last week. Jeff Driskel made his first NFL start Sunday and went 25 of 38 for 236 yards with a touchdown, an interception, a fumble and four sacks.Standout receiver A.J. Green returned after missing three games with an injured toe on his right foot, hoping to give the Bengals’ offence a lift, but he lasted only one quarter. Green reinjured the foot while running a route and came off the field for perhaps the last time this season, slamming his helmet on the ground before leaving on a cart.Cincinnati was penalized eight times in the first half, its most in an opening half since 2009.INJURIESBroncos: LB Brandon Marshall was inactive for the fourth straight game with a knee injury. He practiced last week and was listed as questionable. CB Chris Harris Jr. hurt his lower right leg in the first quarter. DE Derek Wolfe suffered a rib injury in the second quarter.Bengals: LB Vontaze Burfict suffered a concussion in the second half.UP NEXTBroncos: play at the 49ers next Sunday.Bengals: play at the Chargers next Sunday.___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/tag/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFLJoe Kay, The Associated Press read more

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Immersive Technologies releases next generation Advanced Equipment Simulators for both surface and

first_imgAs International Mining collects information on equipment simulators for the article in the October issue, leading mining equipment simulator provider, Immersive Technologies, announces the release of its next generation Advanced Equipment Simulators – the PRO3 for surface mining and the UG360 for underground mining. Incorporating a series of new technologies to increase training effectiveness, they significantly raise the standard for mining equipment training simulators. Designed to simulate surface mining equipment, and available in transportable and classroom versions, the PRO3 builds on the huge success of its predecessor the AES Series 2B which, Immersive says, “has become the global standard in mining over the past 10 years with many hundreds of units now located across 29 countries. The new UG360 has been designed for the specific needs of the underground mining industry. It is the first of its kind to deliver the level of realism accuracy required for training.”Immersive Technologies funded a significant investment in research and development over a three-year period resulting in the PRO3 and UG360 simulators setting new standards for the industry. Designed from the ground up, the key objectives for the PRO3 and UG360 were to maximise training effectiveness, simplify usability and extend reliability. Inspiration was drawn from many sources, including Immersive’s many years of experience with its large, global, customer base, feedback from its OEM exclusive alliance partners, staff feedback and ideas from other industries.Major technological advancements for the PRO3 surface mining simulator include a seamless 180o visual display system, together with a unique feature that dynamically adjusts the perspective of the operator, providing a true real-world view outside of the cabin whilst simultaneously increasing the operator’s level of depth perception.The UG360 simulator includes a new 360o visual system designed specifically for the unique needs of underground mining. Both simulators are installed with new, highly responsive motion platforms that accurately simulate the movement of mining equipment. The level of simulation realism delivered by the PRO3 and UG360 has not previously been experienced by the mining industry. Also added are a series of advancements for transportation, increased ambient temperature operating range, occupant comfort and simplified usability and serviceability.“Our next generation simulators are a quantum leap forward for our customers and for the mining industry. I am pleased to say that the Immersive team has excelled itself by delivering two exceptional training simulators. Immersive is focused squarely on increasing the operator safety and the profitability of our mining customers. The PRO3 and UG360 together with our integration and support services provide mines with unparalleled solutions that are capable of delivering outstanding results.” said Peter Salfinger, CEO, Immersive Technologies.Displayed for the first time last week at the AusIMM 7th Large Open Pit Mining Conference in Perth Western Australia, the PRO3 received substantial interest from new and existing Immersive Technologies’ customers. During this prestigious event, Paul Davis, Executive Global Business Development Manager for Immersive Technologies, presented delegates with a paper on Linking Operator Competency with Performance. This presentation highlighted the outstanding success in business improvement generated to date by the PRO3’s predecessor the AES 2B.“We are excited by the release of these remarkable new simulators and look forward to them achieving even greater success for our customers as they take their place in mines around the world. We encourage our customers to experience both new simulators first hand.” said Davis.Immersive Technologies has exclusive technical alliances with the leading OEMs. These provide Immersive with exclusive access to confidential, technical information that is required to properly simulate the OEM’s machines. The combination of these OEM supported Conversion Kits and the new PRO3 and UG360 simulators provide mines with genuine solutions to increase operator safety while increasing site profitability.An important benefit of the PRO3 is its compatibility with 500+ existing Immersive Conversion Kits (interchangeable machine controls), custom lessons, scenarios and custom mine sites previously developed. This allows AES 2 and AES Series 2B customers to move up to a new PRO3 simulator and not have to replace their existing Conversion Kits and supporting systems.last_img read more

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