Now That’s Sick

first_imgIt’s hard to judge how soon after being sick one can take back to the bike. I guess it depends on what kind of sick it is, and what part of the body had it the worst.I, for instance, was paralyzed in my bed on Sunday with an impromptu colon cleanse. I would like to add that Sunday is my day to ride all day if I want. The one day that I am free from the chains of sticky popsicle hands, dead worms, and mopping yet another pool of pee off of the kitchen floor from…whomever.Imagine my surprise at 4 a.m. when I awoke nauseous and cramped into fetal position. The first thought is, “No! If I hold very still it will go away!” That lasted about two fragile breaths before lurching to the bathroom door in a very unquiet fashion. It’s important in my bedroom to be very quiet when navigating across the floor of Legos, sleeping puppies and laundry piles. SOME PEOPLE become very angry when such a trip becomes eventful.Well it was eventful. I even had the audacity to flush.I had just gotten back to about ten days of good running and riding with sporty new Hi-Tec trail shoes and a regular Tuesday night babysitter for rides when the shit literally hit the fan.I spent hours depleting my body of every drip of fluid before collapsing into a crumpled heap. My body ached with desire to sweat, but there was nothing left. The fan carried the smell of frying bacon into my bed, heaving me back to the bathroom…again and again.I fumbled for my phone to text for the delivery – from two rooms away – of a recovery drink that I had imagined I would be sipping at this very same hour, yet next to a cool stream with mud-splattered legs.I texted again when I couldn’t stand long enough in the window light to read the Tylenol PM bottle instructions, only to learn that I was home alone as everyone was out hiking the Mountains to Sea trail. Children born to unmarried parents are called what? I guessed the dose, which resulted in my first two hours of blissful sleep, followed by a brave foray to the deck. All of this excitement resulted in a complete 12 hours of sleep.I awoke feeling absolutely fine – just in time for a full day’s work. I couldn’t decide whether I was relieved by the timing due to the recent work schedule, or barmy. 1 2last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Crossfit’s Dirty Secret, VA Trout Stocking Review, GA/SC Water Wars

first_imgYour daily outdoor news bulletin for September 25, the day the Little Rock Nine were escorted by armed guard into Little Rock High School in 1959:CrossFit’s Dirty Little Secret: RhabdomyolysisCrossFit is one of those things I will never understand. I get fitness , I get exertion, I get positive reinforcement and pushing yourself and all that. I get the point of CrossFit. What I don’t get is the big hubbub over what is essentially a workout routine. If you bring up CrossFit with, well pretty much anybody, the reactions are blunt and often accompanied by the red face usually reserved for the gym. WTF? Why do people care so much about how other people exercise? Haters call it a cult, CrossFitters call anyone who criticizes it a hater, and the cycle repeats itself. Unfortunately, this is the American Way, and you could take the above statement and apply it to any number of things – gay marriage, PEDs, racism, Miley Cyrus, and that’s just a quick scan of the Twitter feed. The latest argument against CrossFit comes from Eric Robertson on Medium.com in an essay titled, “CrossFit’s Dirty Little Secret.” Robertson is a professor of physical therapy at Regis University, among other things, and states the “dirty secret” of CrossFit is a condition called Rhabdomyolysis, which is essentially working your muscles so hard they explode. Well, rather, the cells that make up your muscles explode, causing permanent damage, amputation, and even death. He claims the competitive nature and culture of CrossFit causes people to blow past what their bodies can handle and put them on the path to “Rhabdo.” He makes a compelling argument, even throwing in some stuff about peeing yourself, but I’m not sure this is the biggest problem in the world. Plus, he doesn’t really have any numbers proving high rates of Rhabdo in CrossFit gyms, just that a lot of CrossFit people are aware that it exists. Weak argument. Then, if you read most of the comments on the article, the classic CrossFit, “you don’t know what we’re about so shut up” attitude is all over the place. Why do people act like this?I have never done CrossFit, but I can tell you one thing for certain: I will never, ever, ever, ever, exercise hard enough that my muscle tissue explodes. That’s for amateurs.Here is a counterpoint from HuffingtonPost contributor Ericka Andersen. Spoiler alert! Here is the last line of the piece (emphasis her’s): “Anyway, haters, stop blaming CrossFit for your problems and take some responsibility for your bad decisions.” So, there you go.Virginia Trout Stocking Shakeup in the WorksThe Virginia trout stocking program is under review, and the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries wants your input. There are a myriad of problems with the current system, but most people come down on one side or the other – I’ll classify them as fly fishermen vs. bait fishermen to make it easier. Fly fishermen want less stocking in native streams, less info on when and what streams are being stocked, they want more catch and release, they want an opening day. Bait fishermen want more fish, bigger fish, more fish, more info on when and where they are stocked, and more fish. These are the guys that follow the stocking trucks around and pull out the biggest fish with panther martins before the last fish hits the water. The DGIF is quick to point out that they do not think the system is broken, but that it can be improved. One of the biggest issues is the bottom line: the DGIF sold 100,000 trout licenses 20 years ago, but only 60,000 last year. This is a disturbing trend. The formal process of evaluating and implementing improvements will take three years – remember this is an arm of the government – and the DGIF will be assisted in their research by Virginia Tech advanced degree fisheries students Vic DiCenzo and Amanda Hyman under their professor Steve McMullin.There will be eight public meetings/hearings on the trout stocking program throughout October and all Virginia anglers are urged to attend and voice their opinion. The first is in Wytheville on September 30th. For a full list of dates, times, and locations of the meetings, click here to see the press release.Water War Between Georgia and South CarolinaDividing states with rivers probably seemed like a good idea in the 18th and 19th centuries, but today it is causing all sorts of problems for state governments, especially in the Southeast. Georgia and South Carolina are currently at odds over the Savannah River that divides their state, and the impact of any decisions will have long lasting affects on industry, drinking water, and utilities for decades. Water demands have skyrocketed in both states over the past several years from a range of sources – nuclear plants, expanding industry, and sea water encroaching on coastal communities’ aquifers being the most prevalent. And then there are the environmental and ecosystem issue raised by basically running the river dry. The good news is that the governors of both states – Nathan Deal of Georgia and Nikki Haley of South Carolina – are sitting down to talk about solutions to the water crisis in attempts to avoid getting caught up in the court system, which could then take years to resolve.This article on GreenvilleOnline.com does a great job of laying out the issues from both sides.last_img read more

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Debate: Should More Wind Farms Be Built in Appalachia?

first_imgYESAppalachia remains heavily dependent on fossil fuels and nuclear energy, and these have a devastating impact on the land, air and water, including literally removing mountains for coal extraction. To address these concerns, we need a mix of energy efficiency and renewable energy. The smart development of wind energy in select areas of Appalachia will allow us to better tackle the challenges of meeting the ever-growing energy demand while simultaneously reducing emissions and local environmental impacts.But why should wind farms get built in Appalachia instead of off coastal shores or on windy plains? The truth is that we need wind farms built in all these areas. A study published by the National Renewable Energy Lab in 2012 highlighted that geographic diversity of renewable energy resources helps ensure a steady supply of power. If the wind isn’t blowing or the sun isn’t shining in one part of the country, it likely is elsewhere.Once built, wind farms emit no pollution, consume no water, and burn no fuel. A study published in the journal Energy Policy found that, on a per-unit of energy basis, fossil fuel power plants are 19-times worse for birds than wind turbines. This past year, more wind energy capacity was installed than any other generation resource, beating out coal, natural gas, and nuclear power.Even so, wind turbines should not receive a free pass to be installed anywhere. Wind farm developers typically take several years for a site assessment to determine potential impacts to habitats, birds and bats, and other environmental concerns. Developers sometimes undergo a viewshed study to evaluate how a wind farm will look from various viewpoints. Some evidence exists that wind farms may even help spur tourism. Certainly, people are fascinated by wind turbines. I’ve experienced their appeal myself;  when planning a fly-fishing trip to West Virginia, my wife chose a bed and breakfast that had a wind-farm view. Had we been on the other side of a ridge, we wouldn’t have known a wind farm was nearby.Done in the right way, wind farms will tap the wind-rich resources of Appalachia while reducing the negative impacts incurred through traditional energy generation. While the suitability of a wind farm varies from site to site, one thing is for sure: more of them should be built in Appalachia.Simon Mahan is the renewable energy manager for the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. NOI recognize the need for alternative energy. I am aware of the harm caused by reliance on coal, and I am concerned about global warming. Appalachian wind development, however, is more of a distraction than a solution to these problems. And it threatens some of the best of the region’s wild landscape.Ridgeline wind projects typically require extensive forest clearing and excavation for roads, turbines, powerlines, and substations. With about a mile needed for every seven turbines, even low-capacity projects result in substantial habitat loss and harm to wildlife. The environmental footprint is simply too large in relation to the benefits.Suppose, for example, we want wind-powered electricity in the summer months when minimum wind availability coincides with maximum electricity demand. Let’s say we want to supply enough electricity to replace just one relatively small 500-megawatt power plant. This very modest objective would require about 300 miles of ridgeline turbine construction, and we would still need another readily available source of power for when there is no wind.Let’s not give the wind industry a pass on environmental review. We should not back away from protection of golden eagles and other wildlife that use the mountain ridges, and projects should not go forward where high bat mortality is expected.Let’s look at other options. Offshore wind development, for example, makes more sense than wind development in the Appalachian mountains—in terms of both electricity generation and environmental cost.And let’s redirect the incentives that finance the wind industry. We could achieve much more with support for residential and urban solar development—something that will actually allow people and communities to assume responsibility for meeting their own electricity needs without harming the environment.And finally, if we are really serious about solving our energy-related problems, we should expect our elected leaders to adopt energy policies that are based on informed analysis instead of wishful thinking.Rick Webb is a senior scientist at the University of Virginia.last_img read more

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New Snack Bars Hit The Market: an interview with Uncomplicated Foods

first_imgAn Uncomplicated ChoiceWith the deluge of snack and energy bars now available, it can be hard to choose which one is right for you. Look beyond the claims on the front of the packaging that scream, “high fiber, sugar free, protein packed, etc.,” and check out what’s on the back. Ever heard of the first five ingredients? Are they whole foods? Can you pronounce them? Why does a snack bar have to be so complicated? Maybe it doesn’t.We sat down with Talia Klein, owner of Uncomplicated Foods, and creator of Tali-O Bites, to learn more about these bars, her company and her mission to bring the world less complicated, more satisfying foods.BRO: What inspired you to start Uncomplicated Foods?TALIA: I started making bars several years ago for my own person eating enjoyment, and I had no intention of ever starting a business. I started making my own bars because, honestly, I was so tired of all the bars that I was buying. I wanted a healthy snack to eat that was satisfying and tasty, so I played around with different flavors and ingredients until I was happy. My friends would always ask me what I was eating, since I would pack my bars everywhere I went, and after they tried them they started asking me if I would make some for them…so I did, happily. After a few months of regularly making bars for my family and friends, I was encouraged to start a business. I felt very encouraged, so I went for it!BRO: What was missing in the marketplace that you saw a need for?TALIA: Bites, but I didn’t know that when I started. In fact I had no intention of making bites. When I first started I was only making 2-oz. bars, which is larger than most bars on the market. I found that when I was really hungry, I could eat one of my bars easily. However, when I was mildly hungry or just wanting a little bit to hold me over, eating a whole bar was too much. So I decided to create TALI-O Bites. I have two sizes of the bites, a 2-oz. and a 6-oz. bag of bites, both in resealable bags.BRO: What makes your bars different?TALIA: Our Bars and Bites have really unique flavor profiles, like our Taste the Tahini Bar, which has the subtle hint of tahini and ginger. All of our bars have very similar ingredient, but when you taste them all, you will be amazed at how different from one another they actually are. Sadly, there are many bars out in the marketplace that are promoting health and nutrition, but in actuality they are glorified candy bars. Tali-O Bars and Bites have no added sugars, period. Our number one ingredient for all our bars and bites are dates, and I have created a recipe that allows the natural sugars to be just enough. Our bars are also very well balanced in terms of their carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. There is a lot of fiber in all of our products which helps make your body feel full and slows down the absorption of sugars into the bloodstream. So when you eat a Tali-O you get a sustained energy from the sugar in the dates without a huge spike in your insulin levels.BRO: What sports/activities are your bars ideal for?Tali-O-OnShelvesTALIA: I personally eat some bites before I head into a yoga class for a little bit of energy to get me through. I have had fans of TALI-O tell me that they love throwing a bag of bits in their gym bags, eating them after a long bike ride, after a Crossfit class, while on a paddleboard, and while hiking. Our motto is “Get Out and Go”, so really any activity. We love it when our fans send us pictures of them enjoying their favorite activities fueled by Tali-O’s.BRO: How long will your bars/bites last?TALIA: Our bars and bites have a great shelf life. I like to refrigerate my Tali-O’s, however that is not necessary; but in the refrigerator they can last up to a year. If you want to keep your Tali-O’s at room temperature they will last for 3-4 months. I would suggest that you keep them out of direct sunlight to keep the all-natural ingredients from oxidizing.BRO: Where can consumers purchase your product?TALIA: From our website: www.uncomplicatedfoods.com. We are hoping to get in stores all across the country, but as a small company we are only in a handful of places in Seattle right now. All of our bars are handmade and ship within one to two days of an order being placed. All orders over $30 dollars come with free shipping, so stock up!BRO: What beer pairs best with your bars?I think Guinness would go great with our bars, especially our Powerfully Peanut bar. Hmmm… I might have to try that right now!–TALI-O is offering BRO readers a 15% discount! Enter the promo code luckyme2 at checkout. Deal ends July 30 with no limit to how many times it can be used.Tali-O-Bites-1last_img read more

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Whiskey and Band Aids, Or The Art of Eating Shit

first_imgYou ride your bike long enough, you’re gonna eat it sooner or later. Especially if you ride in a place like Pisgah National Forest, where the trails can be steep and stacked with off camber root gardens, mandatory boulder drops and little gnomes that jump out of the woods and push you off your bike. Sometimes, it doesn’t even take burly singletrack or mythical woodland creatures to knock you off your bike. Sometimes, you’re going 25 mph down a gravel road after surviving 20 miles of non-stop technical singletrack and combative gnomes and you do something stupid, like take a hand off the handlebars to adjust your helmet, and right then your front tire hits a babyhead in the middle of the road and your handlebars twist. And it happens fast, because you’re going 25 mph, so before you know it, you’re on the ground, elbow and shoulder first, then your face and knees. The bike lands on top of you, like a painful blanket.Ah, mountain biking.Shit happens. The only thing you can do is get back up, make sure nothing’s broken and keep pedaling. But what do you drink to ease the pain when it’s all over? When you’re back home and your picking gravel out of an open wound in your knee? That’s the real question.“Drink some whiskey and rub some dirt on it?”That’s what my buddy suggested after I picked myself up off the gravel.There’s a certain traditional logic to the suggestion. Think of all those great movies where the hero downs a shot of brown stuff and bites down on a strap of leather while his partner digs a bullet out of his shoulder.At this point, drinking a tall glass of bourbon while licking my wounds after eating shit on my bike has become a bit of a tradition for me. The way I do it doesn’t look exactly like those cliché hero/action movie scenes. I tend to whimper more than those dudes in the movies. Typically, nobody is pulling a bullet out of my body. Instead, it’s my wife hovering over me, silently recounting all of the other guys she could’ve married. Bankers and doctors who don’t come home broken and bloody. My ritual usually ends with my wife applying a Hello Kitty Band-Aid to my wound. So really, it looks nothing like those action movies. Except the whisky. That part’s the same.last_img read more

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Returning to Katahdin

first_imgAfter a 44-year wait, Bruce Matson began the 2,189-mile journey that has long been awaiting him. On February 25, Matson set out from Springer Mountain in Georgia to begin a northbound thru-hike of the entire Appalachian Trail (AT). Back in 1974, before a long climb to the top of corporate success, Matson was inspired to look beyond the hustle of city life. At a camp in Connecticut, Bruce first became introduced to the almighty challenge of the Appalachian Trail by the legendary Warren Doyle. Doyle, now a major advocate and teacher so to speak of the A.T., had just recorded the fastest known thru-hike from Georgia to Maine. “I actually said to myself – ‘I’m going to do that some day,” said Matson.As a youth, Matson hiked Mount Katahdin, the northern terminus of the A.T., But then Matson went on to college and law school. Marriage and children also kept his A.T. dreams on hold.But over the years, the Richmond attorney frequently offered “trail magic” to A.T. thru-hikers passing through Virginia, helping them with resupply and bringing them dinner. Now, at age 60, he is finally fulfilling his childhood promise to thru-hike the A.T.Matson is no stranger to long-distance hiking. To prepare for the A.T., Matson hiked the 500-mile Camino de Santiago, as well as the 40-mile Overland Track in Tasmania, and the 35-mile Milford Track in New Zealand. Perhaps the biggest challenge Matson faces won’t be the A.T.’s grueling climbs, but his record-setting fundraising goal. Matson is pledging to raise $250,000 for the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. If successful, Matson will provide the highest individual monetary contribution ever made to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.  The effort is commonly referred to as RTK’s AT Challenge, a reference to his trail name and web site: Returning to Katahdin.“Bruce Matson’s dedication to the Trail has been an inspiration to us all at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy,” said Tiffany Lawrence, vice president of membership and development for the ATC. “His efforts have helped spearhead our new crowdfunding platform, creating a way for all Appalachian Trail lovers to easily raise money to help protect the Trail for generations to come.”  “At this time of my life, it seems that the proper response is to be grateful and to try to give back,” says Matson. “That’s what I’m trying to do here, help make sure in my own small way that this footpath will be available to others with similar dreams.” You can follow in Matson’s footsteps at www.returningtokatahdin.com or on a weekly podcast entitled “Returning To Katahdin:  An Appalachian Trail Dream” (available on iTunes and elsewhere). Author, podcaster, and 2014 AT thru-hiker Steve Adams will be interviewing Matson each week about his progress along the Trail.last_img read more

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Quick Hits: Extreme Cold could kill off a Species, Shutdown Damage, and a Marathoner who ran with 30lbs of Garbage

first_imgMan completes marathon carrying 30 pounds of garbage on his backAndrew Otazo stumbled across the finish line of the Miami Marathon last weekend roughly 10 hours after he began. There was a reason for his last place finish: Otazo was carrying 30 pounds of garbage on his back. “I wanted to produce a very blunt metaphor where I wanted to take the trash out of the swamp, build it into a bag, put it on my back, and then walk it the length of the marathon so people could see it,” Otazo told Runners World. The idea began after Otazo spent time exploring a nature preserve near his home in Key Biscayne, Florida. The high tide flow of the water there tends to leave garbage tangled in the roots of the mangrove trees. Otazo and his partner began cleaning up parts of the preserve, removing an estimated 6,500 pounds of garbage. The marathon was part of a fundraiser for Miami Waterkeeper. Otazo raised over $4,600, which will help clean beaches and mangrove forests and aid in advocating for the reduction of single-use plastic items. Extreme cold could kill off the emerald ash borerOne positive to the extremely cold temperatures currently gripping much of the country is that the frigid temperatures could kill off many—though not eliminate– the emerald ash borer in some Midwestern states. The ash borer is native to northeastern Asia and feeds on ash trees. Accidentally introduced to the United States in the 1990’s, the beetle has decimated ash trees around the country, killing an estimated 100 million ash trees since it was first discovered in Michigan. By some estimates, the conditions gripping the northern plains this weekend could kill up to 80 percent of the emerald ash borer population before temperatures warm. Scientists warn, however, that the borers that do survive may produce hardier young more resistant to extreme cold.National parks report that damage from the shutdown may linger for yearsNow that the partial government shutdown is over (at least until February 15), the National Park Service (NPS) is faced with the task of assessing the damage from the longest shutdown on record. NPS’s acting director, P. Daniel Smith, warned that some parks might not reopen immediately. The National Mall and Memorial Parks and Yellowstone resumed normal operations over the weekend but in Mount Rainer National Park, officials say it could take days to clear the snow off the roads. The former superintendent of Joshua Tree National Park said that it could take hundreds of years for the park to recover from the damage it sustained during the shutdown. When the park reopened on Monday, employees returned to find graffiti, damaged trees and ruined trails. The former NPS director under President Obama says it could take more than a year to recover from the shutdown, and that one of the largest effects may be a slowdown in hiring thousands of temporary summer employees.last_img read more

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The Nine Candidates To Host The 2018 And 2022 World Cups Present Their Bids

first_imgBy Dialogo May 17, 2010 The nine candidates to organize the soccer World Cup in 2018 and 2022 officially submitted their bids Friday at the headquarters of the International Soccer Federation (FIFA) in Zurich. Australia, Belgium-the Netherlands, England, Russia, Spain-Portugal, the United States, Japan, South Korea, and Qatar are the nine countries aspiring to organize the event. At this point, FIFA does not distinguish the countries seeking to organize one or both events. David Beckham, who headed the English delegation, personally delivered the three volumes of bid documents to FIFA president Joseph Blatter. The dossiers will be studied by the Federation, which will then carry out visits to the candidate countries. The countries that will organize the 2018 and 2022 World Cups will be announced on 2 December 2010 in Zurich, at FIFA headquarters. The 2010 World Cup will be held in South Africa, and the 2014 World Cup will be held in Brazil.last_img read more

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Los Zetas, a Cartel of Former Military Personnel, Suspected of Killing Migrants

first_imgBy Dialogo April 14, 2011 Just like the rose bush produces roses, the army produces these degenerate paramilitary groups and how weird is that the USA continues selling them arms and pretending like nothing is happening. In this game those with power win and the powerless people always lose! Los Zetas, whose tentacles extend from the southern United States to Central America, are a group created by Mexican military personnel who deserted to join the Gulf cartel, with which they are now in confrontation, and in order to finance this dispute, they resort to kidnapping migrants and to other crimes. Their territorial base is in northeastern Mexico, where they are believed to have kidnapped several buses and murdered at least 116 people whose bodies were found this month in San Fernando, a town in the state of Tamaulipas, according to statements by the attorney-general, Marisela Morales, on Tuesday. Heriberto Lazcano (alias ‘El Lazca’) is considered the organization’s highest-ranking leader by the Mexican government, which has put a price on his head of more than two million dollars. Los Zetas usually wear black and use military ranks (“commanders,” “veterans,” “falcons,” and “cobras”), and they use “high-powered weapons and cutting-edge technology that they deploy in order to organize ransom operations and large-scale attacks,” a Mexican government document indicates. The Gulf cartel continues to handle the majority of cocaine trafficking, while Los Zetas, according to Guadalupe Cabrera, a professor of government at the University of Texas at Brownsville, have begun to expand into other crimes as well, such as kidnapping, extortion from retailers, and stealing fuel. According to Raúl Benítez, a researcher on security issues at the Autonomous University of Mexico, “they kidnap migrants in order to ask their relatives in the United States for ransom, or in the case of the poorest ones, in order to use them as ‘mules’ (porters) to bring cocaine” into the United States. In August, Los Zetas were alleged to be responsible for the massacre at a rural property in San Fernando of seventy-two migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Ecuador, and Brazil, who had been on their way to the United States. In February 2010, a Texas court found several firms guilty of buying gasoline stolen by Los Zetas in Mexico. In June, Nicaragua seized a weapons stockpile from alleged members of the gang near Managua, and in the same month, Venezuela announced the detention of Luis Tello, a Colombian, whom it identified as a liaison for Los Zetas. In December, the Guatemalan government declared a state of emergency along the Mexican border for several weeks, in order to combat Los Zetas camps, and detained eighteen people. The gang was initially made up of around forty members of the Mexican Army’s special forces, recruited by then-first lieutenant Arturo Guzmán (alias Z-1, for his military code) to provide security for Gulf cartel boss Osiel Cárdenas. Cárdenas was arrested in 2003, extradited to the United States in 2007, and sentenced last year to twenty-five years in prison. Since then, Los Zetas have entered into a fratricidal dispute over control of the Gulf cartel that according to Mexico’s National Security Council had left 1,600 dead as of December.last_img read more

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USS Ingraham succeeds in supporting Operación MARTILLO

first_imgThe crew of the suspect boat threw the cocaine overboard and tried to flee after seeing the Ingraham’s helicopters approaching. But the vessel halted when warning shots were fired by a U.S. Coast Guard marksman from the helicopter, enabling a U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment team (LEDET) to board the boat and arrest the three suspected narco-traffickers. In 2013, the forces of Operación MARTILLO seized 131 metric tons of cocaine, more than 32,000 pounds of marijuana, and 4,000 grams of heroin, in addition to capturing 295 suspects. Since it arrived in the region in March to assist the 4th Fleet, the guided-missile frigate has recorded 14 successful interdictions, preventing about 11,937 kilograms of cocaine from reaching the street. The vessel’s crew has made a number of large seizures. For example, on August 25 the crew seized 550 kilograms from a go-fast boat off the coast of Guatemala. Under Operación MARTILLO the U.S. military, Coast Guard, regional partner nation military forces and law enforcement agencies work together to constantly patrol the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern Pacific to locate and bust drug traffickers. At-sea interdictions are highly coordinated. After a suspicious boat is identified by a participating nation, a U.S. Coast Guard LEDET or partner nation law enforcement agency carries out the boarding and searching of the vessel, in addition to making arrests. Since it arrived in the region in March to assist the 4th Fleet, the guided-missile frigate has recorded 14 successful interdictions, preventing about 11,937 kilograms of cocaine from reaching the street. The vessel’s crew has made a number of large seizures. For example, on August 25 the crew seized 550 kilograms from a go-fast boat off the coast of Guatemala. The Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf, the USS McClusky, the USS Vandegrift, the Ingraham, the Coast Guard Tactical Law Enforcement Team South from Miami, Fla., and Coast Guard Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron from Jacksonville, Fla., also made seizures and detained 36 additional alleged smugglers in the Eastern Pacific. The crew of the suspect boat threw the cocaine overboard and tried to flee after seeing the Ingraham’s helicopters approaching. But the vessel halted when warning shots were fired by a U.S. Coast Guard marksman from the helicopter, enabling a U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment team (LEDET) to board the boat and arrest the three suspected narco-traffickers. The Ingraham and the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell were on patrol when their commanders were notified by a maritime aircraft of a suspicious vessel. The operation combines the forces of 10 countries in the Americas – Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panamá, Canada, and the United States – along with France, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom. These countries work together to share information and use their air, land, and maritime forces to counter illicit trafficking by limiting the use of Central America as a transit area. The operation combines the forces of 10 countries in the Americas – Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panamá, Canada, and the United States – along with France, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom. These countries work together to share information and use their air, land, and maritime forces to counter illicit trafficking by limiting the use of Central America as a transit area. “It has also been a unique opportunity to get to work with so many diverse assets here in Fourth Fleet: three different LEDETs, two USCG Cutters, two other U.S. Navy Frigates and three helicopter detachments. The integration is exceptional.” By Dialogo October 23, 2014 In 2013, the forces of Operación MARTILLO seized 131 metric tons of cocaine, more than 32,000 pounds of marijuana, and 4,000 grams of heroin, in addition to capturing 295 suspects. The USS Ingraham has made quite an impact supporting Operación MARTILLO, a multinational mission to crack down on illicit drug trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. “I could not be more proud of my crew,” said Cmdr. Dan Straub, the USS Ingraham’s commanding officer. “The operational tempo has been high for our entire deployment and Ingraham sailors have done a fantastic job.” Between July and October, Operación MARTILLO seized about 14 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $423 million (USD). The seized cocaine was offloaded at Naval Base San Diego, in the state of California, on October 6. During those four months, the Boutwell made six interdictions, seizing more than 2,267 kilograms of cocaine worth more than $75 million (USD). Its crew captured 19 alleged drug smugglers. “I could not be more proud of my crew,” said Cmdr. Dan Straub, the USS Ingraham’s commanding officer. “The operational tempo has been high for our entire deployment and Ingraham sailors have done a fantastic job.” “It has also been a unique opportunity to get to work with so many diverse assets here in Fourth Fleet: three different LEDETs, two USCG Cutters, two other U.S. Navy Frigates and three helicopter detachments. The integration is exceptional.” The Ingraham and the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell were on patrol when their commanders were notified by a maritime aircraft of a suspicious vessel. The Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf, the USS McClusky, the USS Vandegrift, the Ingraham, the Coast Guard Tactical Law Enforcement Team South from Miami, Fla., and Coast Guard Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron from Jacksonville, Fla., also made seizures and detained 36 additional alleged smugglers in the Eastern Pacific. The USS Ingraham has made quite an impact supporting Operación MARTILLO, a multinational mission to crack down on illicit drug trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. Between July and October, Operación MARTILLO seized about 14 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $423 million (USD). The seized cocaine was offloaded at Naval Base San Diego, in the state of California, on October 6. During those four months, the Boutwell made six interdictions, seizing more than 2,267 kilograms of cocaine worth more than $75 million (USD). Its crew captured 19 alleged drug smugglers. Under Operación MARTILLO the U.S. military, Coast Guard, regional partner nation military forces and law enforcement agencies work together to constantly patrol the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern Pacific to locate and bust drug traffickers. At-sea interdictions are highly coordinated. After a suspicious boat is identified by a participating nation, a U.S. Coast Guard LEDET or partner nation law enforcement agency carries out the boarding and searching of the vessel, in addition to making arrests.last_img read more

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