Triple appointment for historian

first_imgAward-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed, J.D. ’84, will become a professor at Harvard Law School (HLS) and a professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences in July. She also will become the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.Gordon-Reed — recipient of the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize in history, and a National Humanities Medal — comes to Harvard from the New York Law School, where she was the Wallace Stevens Professor of Law, and from Rutgers University, Newark, where she was the Board of Governors Professor of History. She served as the Charles Warren Visiting Professor of American Legal History during the fall of 2009 at Harvard Law School. During this spring term, she served as a visiting professor of law at New York University School of Law.Gordon-Reed said, “I am enormously pleased to become a part of the Harvard community once again. I look forward to working with the students and faculty members at the Law School and in the History Department, and to experiencing the rich interdisciplinary environment at the Radcliffe Institute.”“I celebrate the fact that Annette Gordon-Reed has accepted our invitation to join the Harvard Law School faculty,” said Dean Martha Minow. “Her extraordinary scholarship combines intensive archival research, brilliant lawyerly analysis, and tremendous historical imagination, as well as a gift for writing riveting prose. Long proud of our own graduate, we here at the Law School are delighted she will join our faculty and also participate in the life of the University through affiliations with Radcliffe and the History Department. Colleagues, students, and aspiring scholars rejoice over the chance to work with her as she deepens historical understanding of law, slavery, and the human experience.”Barbara J. Grosz, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, said, “I’m thrilled that Annette Gordon-Reed will join us as the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute.” Reflecting on Gordon-Reed’s interest in the institute’s cross-disciplinary community of scholars, scientists, and artists, Grosz said, “I very much look forward to her participation in the institute’s Fellowship Program and the activities of our Academic Engagement Programs.”“I’m very pleased that a scholar of Annette Gordon-Reed’s ability and depth will be joining the History Department,” said Michael D. Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “And I am excited that Harvard College students will have the opportunity to learn directly from an award-winning historian and renowned legal scholar.”Gordon-Reed is the author of  “Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy” (1997), which examines the scholarly writing on the relationships between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings. The book was a finalist for the annual Library of Virginia Awards. Gordon-Reed’s most recent book, “The Hemingses of Monticello” (2008), which traces the lives of four generations of a slave family, won numerous awards, including, in addition to the National Book Award and the Pulitzer, the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Book Award, the George Washington Book Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the New Jersey Council of the Humanities Book Award, the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, the Library of Virginia Literary Award, and the Southern Historical Association Owsley Award. The book was also a finalist for the 2009 National Book Critics Circle Award. Two more books, “Jefferson: A Reader on Race” and “Andrew Johnson,” are forthcoming.Gordon-Reed is also the co-author of “Vernon Can Read!: A Memoir” (2001), which was written with Vernon Jordan Jr. and received the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. She is editor of “Race on Trial: Law and Justice in American History” (2002).Gordon-Reed is a member of the Council of Foreign Relations. Prior to becoming an academic, she was counsel to the New York City Board of Correction from 1987 to 1992. In this capacity, she helped to formulate policies, grievance procedures, and legislation affecting inmates. After graduating from HLS, Gordon-Reed was an associate at Cahill Gordon & Reindel in New York.While a student at Harvard Law School, Gordon-Reed served as an editor for the Harvard Law Review. In addition to her J.D., she holds an A.B. from Dartmouth College in history and an honorary doctor of letters from Ramapo College. She will receive an honorary degree from the College of William & Mary in mid-May.last_img read more

Continue reading

Daniel Bell, social scientist, 91

first_imgDaniel Bell, the Henry Ford II Professor of Social Sciences Emeritus at Harvard University and one of America’s most dynamic thinkers, died on Jan. 25. He was 91.Born in 1919 in New York City, Bell graduated from the City College of New York with a bachelor’s degree in science and social science in 1938, and studied at Columbia University from 1938 to 1939. His career began with journalism — Bell served as managing editor of The New Leader, then as labor editor of Fortune, and finally co-editor of The Public Interest.He taught at the University of Chicago and Columbia before joining the Harvard faculty. He retired in 1990.His most famous books include “The End of Ideology,” “The Coming of Post-Industrial Society,” and “The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism” — the first and latter books were listed by the Times Literary Supplement as among the 100 most important books in the second half of the 20th century.Bell leaves behind his wife, Pearl; a daughter, Jody; a son, David; and four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The funeral will be private.A memorial service for Daniel Bell will take place on April 15 at 1:00 p.m. in Harvard’s Memorial Church.last_img read more

Continue reading

Reunited with a ‘transcendent’ figure

first_img Art historian Melissa McCormick brings Japanese masterpiece to life The University’s links with the island nation span more than a century Walter Sedgwick ’69 grew up visiting the sculpture every summer at his grandparents’ home, Long Hill, in Beverly, Mass. He felt a special connection to “Prince Shōtoku,” even from a young age.“He was a figure of great reverence — very mysterious in a way, transcendent,” said Sedgwick, “but also tangible in other ways because of his baby-like form.” Sedgwick’s grandfather, Atlantic Monthly owner-editor Ellery Sedgwick, acquired “Prince Shōtoku” during a trip to Japan in 1936.Recently, Walter Sedgwick has made the extraordinary gesture of gifting the sculpture to the Harvard Art Museums, in memory of Ellery Sedgwick Sr. and Ellery Sedgwick Jr., ensuring that it will be available for study and appreciation for generations to come. The sculpture is the subject of the new exhibition Prince Shōtoku: The Secrets Within (on view  through Aug. 11).Made of Japanese cypress with inlaid rock crystal eyes, the sculpture depicts Shōtoku Taishi, who is believed to be the founder of Buddhism in Japan. At the age of 2 (1 by the Western count), Prince Shōtoku is said to have faced east, praised the Buddha, and manifested a relic between his hands; the sculpture depicts that moment. Dating to approximately 1292, the “Sedgwick Shōtoku” is widely recognized as the world’s oldest and finest surviving representation of Prince Shōtoku at age 2.“Prince Shōtoku” is life-size and lifelike in the way it portrays the young child, complete with a large head, smooth skin, and the chubbiness typical of a baby. “When you are close to him, he has a living presence,” said Rachel Saunders, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Associate Curator of Asian Art, who curated the Prince Shōtoku exhibition. “This is something you sense even if you don’t know anything about Japanese Buddhist sculpture or Prince Shōtoku.”Ellery Sedgwick displayed “Prince Shōtoku” in a Japanese shrine at Long Hill. And even though Walter Sedgwick said he and his siblings knew never to touch the sculpture, “Shōtoku was sort of a presence emanating from within the shrine — it was quite magical.” Studying Japan from ancient to modern Sparking curiosity“Prince Shōtoku” kept company at Long Hill with oil paintings, ceramics, and centuries-old, hand-painted wallpaper. As he grew older, Sedgwick’s grandmother, Marjorie Russell, would take him around the house, answering his questions about each object. “Prince Shōtoku,” however, was generally acknowledged by Sedgwick and his siblings to be “the magnet” within the house, and was “the object I had the closest relationship with,” he said. “So, piece by piece, I learned about Shōtoku.”Sedgwick also learned of a comprehensive 1968 article about the sculpture, written by Harvard professor and curator John Rosenfield. This scholarship not only elucidated some of the crucial historical background of the sculpture, but also detailed the 1937 discovery at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, of more than 70 dedicatory objects sealed inside the object. Marjorie introduced Sedgwick to Rosenfield, kicking off a relationship that left “a huge impression on me,” he said.,In addition to taking some of Rosenfield’s classes, Sedgwick turned to him as a mentor. “He took me under his wing, and that’s why my interest in Asia grew so rapidly,” Sedgwick said. “He’d take you into the library and you’d go one-on-one [researching a specific question]. What more could you ask for?”Sedgwick pursued his passion for Japanese art after Harvard, living in Japan for six months and then launching a store in Cambridge dedicated to Asian books. Although his professional life eventually took a different direction, “an interest in Asian art and culture has always been with me,” he said.A figure to rally aroundSedgwick returned to Harvard in late May for the opening of Prince Shōtoku: The Secrets Within, where he watched as “Prince Shōtoku” did what he seems to do best: bringing people together. Specialists in various disciplines, from across Harvard and around the world, have studied the sculpture, and some of their latest findings were revealed in a public lecture by exhibition curator Rachel Saunders and Angela Chang, assistant director of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies.“In a sense, I see him as an ambassador to the world — for all the other sculptures and works of art” that are not as accessible for study, Sedgwick said. “But I think he would have wanted to be studied,” he added with a laugh. “Prince Shōtoku really is an ambassador, and an inheritance of humanity.” Curating a classic ‘Genji’ exhibit at the Met Relatedlast_img read more

Continue reading

The Nine Candidates To Host The 2018 And 2022 World Cups Present Their Bids

first_imgBy Dialogo May 17, 2010 The nine candidates to organize the soccer World Cup in 2018 and 2022 officially submitted their bids Friday at the headquarters of the International Soccer Federation (FIFA) in Zurich. Australia, Belgium-the Netherlands, England, Russia, Spain-Portugal, the United States, Japan, South Korea, and Qatar are the nine countries aspiring to organize the event. At this point, FIFA does not distinguish the countries seeking to organize one or both events. David Beckham, who headed the English delegation, personally delivered the three volumes of bid documents to FIFA president Joseph Blatter. The dossiers will be studied by the Federation, which will then carry out visits to the candidate countries. The countries that will organize the 2018 and 2022 World Cups will be announced on 2 December 2010 in Zurich, at FIFA headquarters. The 2010 World Cup will be held in South Africa, and the 2014 World Cup will be held in Brazil.last_img read more

Continue reading

Great Neck Plaza Village Accused of Housing Discrimination

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Village of Great Neck Plaza officials allegedly broke the law by discriminating against affordable-housing applicants based on race, age and disability, a pair of fair-housing nonprofit advocacy groups alleged in a federal lawsuit they filed last week.The village set discriminatory requirements for residents seeking affordable housing units in a 94-unit rental development called the Maestro, according to the lawsuit filed by Long Island Housing Services (LIHS) and the Fair Housing Justice Center (FHJC). The suit also names the Nassau County Industrial Development Agency, which provided financial assistance to Plaza Landmark, the developer of the Maestro.“In general theory, without a neutral policy that is applied evenly, these laws tend to maintain the status quo,” said Erik Heins, the attorney for LIHS. “In this case, the racial proportions of the village and the surrounding peninsula are much less balanced than the rest of the county.”The village code outlines three categories of prospective residents, giving preference to residents of the village and residents of Great Neck Peninsula, both of which are predominately white, over residents of other areas of Nassau County. Seventy-eight percent of the village population and 74 percent of the peninsula population is non-Hispanic white, according to the 2010 U.S. Census.“Our primary goal is to make sure that these preferences do not prevent minorities from coming in,” said Diane Houk, the attorney for FHJC.The code also defines eligible residents in all three categories to be either under the age of 40 or over the age of 65. These requirements violate Nassau County law, Houk said.The lawsuit is based on a joint investigation conducted by the plaintiffs in 2013. The investigation found, in addition to the residency and age requirements, the village would not allow any applicant with disabilities to have a live-in home health care aide who was not related to the applicant.Attorneys for the village and county were not immediately available for comment.The lawsuit is the latest in several accusations of housing discrimination on Long Island. U.S. District Judge Arthur D. Spatt ruled in December that a Garden City zoning ordinance discriminated against minority residents. And the U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the Town of Oyster Bay in April over alleged discrimination in the town’s affordable housing programs.last_img read more

Continue reading

Emre Can insists ‘champion’ Aaron Ramsey will be a success at Juventus

first_imgEmre Can insists ‘champion’ Aaron Ramsey will be a success at Juventus Metro Sport ReporterSunday 17 Feb 2019 6:40 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisement Ramsey and Can have played against each other before (Picture: Getty)Emre Can believes Aaron Ramsey will be a success at Juventus when the Welshman joins the club in the summer.Can joined the Turin side himself back in 2018 from Liverpool, and he’s gone on to make 23 appearances for the club so far this season.Now, Ramsey is also set to join Juventus at the end of the season on a free transfer after 11 years playing for Arsenal.The 28-year-old could start alongside the Germany international in central midfield for the 2019/20 campaign.ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAnd Can, who played against Ramsey in the Premier League when he was at Liverpool, believes his future new team-mate has what it takes to be a success in Italy.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘If he has played for Arsenal for all these years and has scored so many goals, then it means that he’s a champion,’ Can told Tuttosport.‘I have been up against him a few times, and he has always impressed me. He will be a good arrival for us.More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors‘Really, the club is like a big family. The locker-room spirit is also similar to what I had experienced at Liverpool, but I really like it here at Juventus, because it’s not just a set of champions. The sense of a team, the group, is strongly felt.’Juventus are currently top of the league after 24 games this season and are still yet to lose a league game.Arsenal, meanwhile, are fifth in the Premier League and just a single point behind Manchester United who are fourth.MORE: Juventus director of football claims Arsenal have not used Ramsey properlyWill Ramsey be a success for Juventus?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultscenter_img Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

Continue reading

4Subsea, Ashtead in Sensor Tech Pact

first_img4Subsea and Ashtead Technology have sealed a partnership for global distribution of sensor technology to the oil and gas industry.Under the deal, 4Subsea’s autonomous, retrofittable sensors will be available to the global oil and gas industry via Ashtead Technology.Additionally, 4Subsea will explore utilising Ashtead’s acoustic sensors for further developing their services offering to the market.Ashtead will further enhance its inspection, maintenance and repair (IMR) services by adding 4Subsea’s sensors to its portfolio and gaining access to 4Subsea’s domain experts within subsea production, well intervention and drilling.4Subsea will strengthen its position in the global sensor market with hardware and digital services delivery through Ashtead’s sales and distribution network including facilities in Aberdeen, Abu Dhabi, Halifax, Houston and Singapore.“We regard this partnership as a joining of forces to enhance our offering to the market and drive greater customer success. Ultimately we believe this partnership will support operators in reducing both risk and costs associated with operating subsea fields.” – Peter Jenkins, CEO of 4Subsea“Adding 4Subsea’s autonomous sensor technology and services to our existing capabilities means we can now offer a comprehensive monitoring and integrity management service to support the performance and life extension of critical infrastructure.” – Allan Pirie, CEO of Ashtead Technology.last_img read more

Continue reading

Barcelona, Real Madrid plan 30% player wage cuts

first_img Clubs from across the Spanish top flight are expected to be severely impacted by the ongoing La Liga suspension due to the coronavirus pandemic. Barcelona are reportedly aiming to recoup an estimated €230m due to the reductions, with transfer budgets also reduced and big name arrivals restricted this summer.Advertisement Barcelona and Real Madrid are both planning to reduce their first team squad salaries by 30% ahead of the 2020-21 La Liga season. According to Sunday’s front page of Diario AS, the El Clasico pair are both considering major cuts as part of financial restructuring this summer. The report also states the likelihood of games being played closed doors will effect sponsorship deals, with pitch side advertising reduced to zero. Promoted Content20 Facts That’ll Change Your Perception Of “The Big Bang Theory”27 Animals That Don’t Need Color To Be Cool6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes6 TV Characters Whose Departures Have Made The Shows BetterCelebrities Showing Support For George Floyd Protests5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better20 “The Big Bang Theory” Moments Only A Few Fans Knew AboutPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D Graffiti Read Also: Bundesliga restart suffers blow as Dresden squad placed in quarantine La Liga is working towards a return for the 2019-20 campaign in mid-June, however games are certain to be played without fans for the remainder of the season. Supporters are unlikely to be permitted to attend games if the 2020-21 season begins as planned in September, with restrictions rumoured to be in place until the end of 2020. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more

Continue reading

Four first-time winners at Algona

first_imgBy Greg GrabianowskiALGONA, Iowa (Aug. 24) – Rob Hughes, John Wiemann, Doug Wickman and Jay DeVries all won features at Algona Raceway for the first time in 2013 to highlight the night of dirt track racing on Saturday, Aug. 24. The most dramatic race of the night came in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod feature. Mike Carlson started on the pole and grabbed the early lead before an early challenge from Phil Ricke as two went door-to-door for two laps. The only caution of the race waved on lap six. George Nordman, who started 11th, weaved his way into contention for the final five laps to put the heat on Carlson. Nordman patiently stayed behind Carlson until turn two on the final lap when he slid past on the bottom of the track and went on to the victory. Carlson was second with Nick Meyer placing third. Shane Swanson was fourth and Ricke rounded out the top five cars. Mick Monahan was the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature’s early leader before Philip Lusson wrestled the lead away on lap three. Lusson held the lead until lap seven when Wickman steered his no. 24W to front on lap eight and went on to the win.Lusson finished as the runner-up followed by Brandon Nielsen, Devin Smith and Chad Gentz.The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature was run without a stoppage of action as Wiemann lead at the end of the first lap and held the lead throughout the 12-lap race to earn his first feature win of the year at the track.David Smith was second with Calvin Lange finishing third. Tom Sierck was fourth and Dan Hanselman placed fifth. Pole sitter Rob Hughes won the IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified main ahead of Tad Reutzel, Ryan Watnem and Dustin Smith. DeVries won his first Mach-1 Sport Compact feature of the year.last_img read more

Continue reading

Duke wins Clinton County PASS battle

first_imgMost of the race was a dogfight between Duke, polesitter John Walp and outside front-row starter Dylan Proctor, with Proctor leading the most laps but all three drivers taking turns at the front.  That enabled sixth starting Jack Frye to move into third but he was unable to challenge for the lead. Scott Ellerman finished fourth and Scott Lutz finished fifth. Duke took his sixth PASS event of the season and third at Lock have. By Frank Buhrman After Duke, who had started third, grabbed the lead for the final time, Walp spun and had to re­start in the rear.  Feature results – 1. Ken Duke Jr.; 2. Dylan Proctor; 3. Jake Frye; 4. Scott Ellerman; 5. Scott Lutz; 6. Reed Thompson; 7. Dakota Schweikart; 8. Jeffrey Weaver; 9. Dale Schweikart; 10. Tylor Cochran; 11. Josh Fox; 12. John Walp; 13. Ian Cumens; 14. Mike Murphy; 15. Dave Guss. LOCK HAVEN, PA. (July 26) – Ken Duke Jr. emerged from an intense, nearly race-long three-car bat­tle to win the 25-lap IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car event co-sponsored by the Pennsylvania Sprint Series and Laurel Highlands Sprint Series Friday at Clinton County Motor Speedway. last_img read more

Continue reading