Packing for plants

first_imgBy Wade HutchesonUniversity of GeorgiaAny move requires packing to ease the transition. Moving plants is no different. But instead of packing stuff, you have to pack the roots for the move.At Berry College in 1992, I was working at Oak Hill, Martha Berry’s home. I had an opportunity to help transplant native azaleas from a national forest back to Berry.What was sold as an opportunity turned out to be a lot like work. Over two days, three of us dug, tugged, wrapped and toted 35 native azaleas out of the woods to the truck. The truck was always uphill. Each azalea had been carefully dug to keep as many roots intact as possible.At the end of the second day, even my hair hurt (I had some back then). But I knew our effort would pay off and was glad to have been a part.Transplanting successThen we got back to Oak Hill and, of course, our prizes had to be replanted. And as my luck would have it, every planting site was uphill. Fortunately for my aching back, there were more hands to help replant.All 35 azaleas survived and put on a spectacular bloom the next spring, mainly because we had packed their bags.We did this during the week after Thanksgiving, which brings me to this point. If you have a tree or shrub in need of transplanting, now is the time. Digging conditions are as good as they’re going to get.Fall is always perfect for transplanting. And due to our unusually heavy rainfall in October, the soil is in good working shape.The key to successThe key to success in transplanting is taking roots — the more the better. I’ve often heard people describe the process as digging a big root ball, which to some means a lot of soil. If there are no roots in that soil, it really doesn’t matter how big the ball is. The roots need to go with it.Start by exploring the soil at least 4 feet away from the trunk. Use a spading fork or other probing tool to help find the major roots.Once you find all the major roots, gently dig, lift and pull them out of the ground. Follow them out as far as you can. And try to leave the big roots intact. Some may need to be pruned to keep the job doable.Then return to the trunk and dig under and around the main trunk at least 2 feet around. You should find roots underneath that will need to be pruned. Rocking and lifting (don’t forget the grunts) will help you identify roots.Keep root mass intactAgain, try to keep as much of the root mass intact as possible. Shave away the soil to help lighten the load.While you’ve worked hard to get to this point, it’s about to get harder. Now the plant needs to be lifted and moved to the new site.You may need to call in a few favors from neighbors. Some will carry the main trunk, and some may be needed to tote major roots. Use a sturdy tarp or heavy burlap to wrap the main root ball with while moving.Try to keep as much soil around the roots as you can, but I’ll trade soil for roots any day.The new planting site should be ready to receive the plant when it arrives, including amending the soil in a large area and not just the planting hole.Incentive to plant properlyAll of your hard work to dig the plant up should be incentive to provide a great new home. Heavily amend an area five times the size of the root ball to be planted. Remove the burlap before planting.(Before you do any of this, think about the new site. Make sure it’s suited for the plant now and in the future. Don’t end up having to move it again.)If all goes well, all that’s left is backfilling soil. You may need to adjust the hole size and shape to accommodate the major roots. Spread them out as they were in the original site. I’ve even dug “ditches” in order to replant some of my transplants’ roots.Water to settle the soil. It shouldn’t need much watering after that until spring. Next summer, it may need weekly watering if rainfall is short.Not moving again is exactly my goal. Plants will travel successfully, however, if you take time to pack their bags first.For more information, contact the University of Georgia Extension Service in your county.last_img read more

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Food Stamp Participation Reaches All-Time High in Vermont

first_imgFood Stamp Participation Reaches All-Time High in Vermont During Holiday SeasonBurlington, VT, December 2, 2008 – While many in Vermont were savoring Thanksgiving treats last week, others were signing up for food assistance; 60,062 Vermonters, almost 1 in 10, now participate in the Food Stamp Program according to data released by the Department for Children and Families. This number is up by over 1,500 in just one month, up 7,000 since this time last year, and represents a record high for Vermont.According to Angela Smith-Dieng, Food Stamp Outreach & Policy Specialist at the Vermont Campaign to End Childhood Hunger, “The upsurge in participation may be in part due to policy changes that took effect on October 1st. However, given the downturn in the economy coupled with high food and fuel costs, the increase may have more to do with increased need. With hunger on the rise across Vermont, increased participation indicates that more Vermonters are taking advantage of this critical nutrition assistance.”Food stamps are a USDA entitlement program designed to respond quickly to increased need. For a household that is struggling financially, infusing food dollars into their budget frees up money for other expenses. At the same time, by participating in the program they are more likely to be in good health and succeed in school and at work. Thanks to changes made to the program by the Agency of Human Services, thousands more Vermonters will be eligible for these benefits as of January 1, 2009.Smith-Dieng says: “We’re glad that more Vermonters are receiving the food benefits they are entitled to. Nevertheless, 1 in 3 Vermonters are eligible but not participating – we are working hard to spread the word about the expanding program. We invite every Vermonter to spread the word about this program to neighbors who might be struggling: through school and congregation newsletters, local senior centers, town clerks offices, and health clinics.”More information and materials about the Food Stamp Program is available at www.vermontfoodhelp.com(link is external).The Vermont Campaign to End Childhood Hunger is a statewide nonprofit organization that combats hunger through advocacy, education, and technical assistance. Since 1993, VTCECH has been providing communities with the tools to create and sustain local programs that feed children in need. Information on VTCECH, hunger in Vermont and federal nutrition programs is available at www.vtnohunger.org(link is external).###last_img read more

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Absolute honesty

first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Six laws to promote a corporate culture of integrity.by: Kelly SchmidtTruer words have never been spoken…“Raise your hand if you have taught your children not to lie,” Larry Johnson asked the audience at CUES’ Directors Conference this week. Over 400 hands reached for the sky.“Raise your hand if you have ever told a lie,” followed up Johnson, co-author of Absolute Honesty: Building a Corporate Culture That Values Straight Talk and Rewards Integrity. Again, over 400 arms went into the air.So, where is the disconnect? How can we say one thing, but practice the complete opposite? More importantly, how can we build a corporate culture that values straight talk and rewards integrity when we are all less than stellar at always telling the truth?At Directors Conference, Johnson presented “Six Laws of Absolute Honesty.”Law #1: Tell the truth.We know everyone tells white lies from time to time. The problem is, individuals have different opinions about when the total truth should be told. When Johnson asked the audience, “What is your criteria for not telling a white lie?” several answers came back, including:if the consequence is worse than the lieif it is for something illegal, immoral or unethicalif the lie is unfair to others continue reading »last_img read more

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Police: Man taken to hospital following crash on Route 434

first_img11:46 A.M. UPDATE: Binghamton Police shut down the right lane of Route 434 Eastbound but the left lane remains operational. —– VESTAL (WBNG) — Both lanes of Route 434 Eastbound are back open following a one-car crash. The police department says one man was taken to the hospital for unknown injuries.center_img A 12 News crew on the scene reported that the vehicle that crashed was in an embankment. Police are investigating what caused the driver to go off the road. For the most up to date information go to the 511NY website by clicking here. VESTAL (WBNG) — The Binghamton Police Department responded to a one-car crash on Route 434 Wednesday morning.last_img

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Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang claims Arsenal’s ‘crazy’ front three can match Liverpool trio

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang claims Arsenal’s ‘crazy’ front three can match Liverpool trio Roberto Firmino scored Liverpool’s winning goal against Southampton last weekend (Picture: Getty)‘Hopefully, yes [we can hit it off straight away]. I think we can do it.‘First of all, he [Pepe] speaks French so it will be easy for him to settle in and play with us. He only started training with us a few weeks ago but it’s good to have him with us. He’s started well.‘Last season he was amazing. He’ll bring us speed and excellent finishing, and that’s good for us.‘As we’ve seen from last season, Liverpool play with three up front and they play very well. Why not us? I think we can do it.‘It will be a tough game against them. They are great players. They always try to go forward and try to get goals and assist each other. They are one of the best trios in the world.‘I see a lot of similarities. Pepe and me, we are quick players like Mane and Salah, while Laca is a player who can keep the ball and is really good with his feet like Firmino.‘So yes, we can say we are close enough.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Metro Sport ReporterFriday 23 Aug 2019 8:56 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link3kShares Comment Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Alexandre Lacazette both scored in Arsenal’s win over Burnley (Picture: Getty)Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang believes the signing of Nicolas Pepe means Arsenal now boast a ‘crazy’ attacking trio capable of matching the goalscoring feats of Liverpool’s fearsome front three.The Gabon international has picked up from where he left off last season, scoring the decisive goals in Arsenal’s victories over Newcastle and Burnley which sealed the club’s first 100% start to a new campaign for the first time since 2009.Alexandre Lacazette also scored in the win over Sean Dyche’s team while club-record signing Nicolas Pepe produced a more than encouraging performance on his home debut after he was introduced as a second-half substitute.AdvertisementAdvertisementThe Ivory Coast international is closing in on a first start according to Unai Emery, but after suffering a crushing 5-1 defeat at Anfield last season the Spaniard may opt for a more defensive line-up.ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityRoberto Firmino scored a hat-trick in that demoralising defeat, Emery’s biggest loss since succeeding Arsene Wenger, while his partners in crime, Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane, ended up sharing last season’s Golden Boot with Aubameyang.All three Liverpool stars have already opened their goalscoring accounts for the season, but Aubameyang is confident Arsenal now boast a forward line comparable with anything else the Premier League has to offer.‘It is going to be crazy – everybody is excited,’ Aubameyang told Sky Sports when discussing playing alongside Lacazette and Pepe. ‘I am looking forward to it.last_img read more

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Brisbane home sells in a day

first_img65 Sinnamon Rd, Sinnamon ParkMr Juresic said interest in the family home was huge.“We’ve sold so much property in the area so we had plenty of buyers to show the property to straight away,” he said.“The sellers are over the moon.”An older couple keen wishing to downsize purchased the property. 65 Sinnamon Rd, Sinnamon ParkA Sinnamon Park property has sold within ten hours of going on the market and for $100,000 above the sellers’ expectations. The four-bedroom, two-bathroom home at 65 Sinnamon Rd is under contact following a $950,000 deal. “Their goal was to get about $825,000 and even if it were $850,000, that would have been fantastic,” NGU Elite Team’s Emil Juresic said.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor8 hours ago“We put it on the market and sold the house literally ten hours later.”last_img read more

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IPE Views: Why are error margins ignored in LDI?

first_imgThe importance of knowing the errors in any measurement is not just critical for the pilots of low-flying planes. It has a fundamental importance in the management of financial assets and liabilities, and it appears to have been ignored often.The reason for this is quite simply that, whilst experimental physicists can claim to have a deep knowledge of mathematics (two-thirds of my first-year lectures were in mathematics), much of the application of mathematical techniques to finance has been undertaken by mathematicians for whom the whole idea of error margins appears to be an alien concept. The effects can be seen throughout the financial world.For pension funds, the effects of this can be seen in the way a mathematician and an experimental physicist might approach a typical problem such as calculating a liability-driven investment (LDI) strategy. Typically, an actuary with a pure mathematics background would state that, as of the moment of calculation, the liabilities are precisely £1,543,456,000 based on his models, and this value changes by the minute in the light of market movements in government bonds. Asset allocation decisions in the form of precisely matching cashflows should be based on this and continuously rebalanced in the light of any mismatches that appear with time. This would lead to frequent rebalancing decisions, with all the costs that would entail.A physicist, on the other hand, would come up with the answer that the best estimate for liabilities is a figure of £1.5bn, plus or minus £100m, reflecting factors such as uncertainties in mortality rates, the appropriate risk-free government bond yield and so on. The figure, together with the error associated with it, should be the basis on which asset allocation and any hedging decisions are made. Moreover, this figure and the error associated with it are likely to remain relatively stable, and so little rebalancing would be justified. Clearly, the financial and economic consequences of the two approaches are likely to be very different!The economic reality is there are large uncertainties in a valuation due to inherent uncertainties in the maturity profile of the pension liabilities, for example, and also in the actual future risk-free bond yields that are the basis for any form of discounting. Current government bond yields clearly do not represent an unbiased estimate for future government bond returns, with the effects of quantitative easing and the artificial demand stimulated by the effect of rigid LDI approaches to matching. Using government bond yields to discount pension fund liabilities may be useful for accountants and as a shorthand, but the calculated discounted value of the liabilities represents an estimate not an absolute truth.The reality is that any economic valuation of a pension fund’s liabilities has an error margin built into it. The size of that is of critical importance since it effectively determines whether expensive approaches using risk-free government bond portfolios to match liabilities make any sense at all. If error margins in liabilities are large, then adopting an approach of approximate matching using asset classes such as equities and other assets aimed at producing high long-term absolute returns with given levels of risk may be more sensible than investing in bonds with precise cashflows to match liabilities with much more imprecise cashflows. Investors may be better off even in an LDI context, with approximate matches that are cheap, than purchasing expensive and precisely tailored cashflows via sovereign debt to match liability streams that are themselves only imperfectly defined. This is particularly so when core euro-zone bonds are offering negative yields.Unless there is a proper appreciation of error margins in the valuations of assets and liabilities, pensions funds may be like the pilot of the low-flying plane at night who has been given some measurements of the buildings he is flying over but no has appreciation of the error margins in the heights. Perhaps it is time for the mathematicians to move aside and let the experimental physicists take the lead in applying mathematics to an imperfect world!Joseph Mariathasan is contributing editor at IPE The importance of knowing the errors in any measurement is not just critical for the pilots of low-flying planes, Joseph Mariathasan warnsMathematics lies at the heart of modern finance and its applications to investment. But there is a fundamental difference between the way pure mathematicians would approach the use of mathematical models to describe the world outside the lecture theatre and the approach adopted by physicists.Many of the current ills of the financial market can be placed at the doors of the mathematicians who tried to apply mathematical rigour to the financial world, assuming the same success could be achieved as that seen in the physical world. The errors of this have been described very well in books such as The Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb.One of the clearest things I still remember from my undergraduate lectures in experimental physics is that, when it comes to the measurement of any quantity, the estimate of the error associated with the measurement is just as important as the measurement itself. In simple terms, if you measure the height of a building as 34.5 metres, it is as important to know whether the error in the measurement is plus or minus 20 meters or plus or minus 0.2 meters.last_img read more

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New powers to direct LGPS investment ‘unprecedented’, says Eversheds

first_imgHe added that the new rules seemed to be “giving with one hand and taking with the other”, and that it was “pretty unprecedented” the government would have the power over investments.Clifford Sims, a partner at Squire Patton Boggs, said the new powers should be regarded as a way of granting the DCLG a carrot and stick with which to ensure the pooling of assets.He praised the way in which the new regulations were drafted and said he expected the ability of the government to intervene was likely to be reserved for funds unwilling to pool assets.Pointing to the consultation document that said the government would be able to intervene where an administering authority was “carrying out another pension-related function poorly”, Sims speculated that intervention would not be limited to investment decisions.“I think it is not just pooling, I think it is poor performance,” he said. “If they think someone is a sickly child, they will intervene.”Delderfield noted that The Pensions Regulator did not currently have the powers to direct investment.Instead, with schemes where it has concerns over aspects of management, it is able to replace one or all of the trustees.However, Jae Fassam, a senior associate at Pinsent Masons, said the change was in line with the rules governing private sector schemes, with a move towards a principles-based regulatory framework.“There has never been a power for the secretary of state to intervene in this way before, but, with the [previous] 2009 regulations, he already had intervened – he had just done so prior to publishing them,” he said. The only one of the English pooling proposals to so far meet the £25bn threshold is the London collective investment vehicle, which earlier this week announced the names of four managers in charge of £6bn in mandates. New rules allowing the UK government to control investments made by local authority funds are “unprecedented”, going beyond the influence The Pensions Regulator exerts over private sector schemes.Unveiled as part of the Department for Communities and Local Government’s (DCLG) legislative backstop to ensure local government pension schemes (LGPS) pool assets into up to six vehicles no smaller than £25bn (€35.5bn), the regulation also removed the current statutory investment rules, instead requiring an investment strategy statement be drafted that allows investments as long as they are prudent.Joanne Segars, chief executive of the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association, welcomed aspects of the new regulation and praised the shift to the prudent person model, saying the association had long backed such a change. However, Gary Delderfield, a partner at law firm Eversheds, said the new regulation seemed “pretty unique”, as it allowed the secretary of state for communities – currently Greg Clark – to amend a fund’s investment strategy statement and direct investment in specific assets.last_img read more

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Ditlev Engel: Why Would You Tax Something You Want More Of?!

first_imgDitlev Engel speaking at the opening session of the Offshore Wind Conference 2018 in Amsterdam. Photo: Jeroen Tresfon/ Navingo.Taxation of electricity produced by offshore wind and other renewables, as well as taxing these technologies, is something the industry needs to stand up against if it wants to see even lower costs and accelerate the energy transition, according to Ditlev Engel, CEO at DNV GL Energy. In most countries, the industry is talking about cost of energy and lowering cost of energy, but the real matter should be taxation of electricity, according to Engel.“Taxation is what most people are paying for the most, it is not the cost of generation. Therefore, the real question here is not about the technology, but about how most regulators and politicians have decided to tax it and, if we are trying to meet the goals from the Paris Agreement, will they tax the electricity and why would they do that,” Engel said.“The reason we taxed it in the old days is because we wanted to lower CO₂ emissions, so why would you now tax something you want more of?!”Speaking about the energy transition at the opening session of the Offshore Wind Conference 2018 in Amsterdam, Engel said that the energy transition can only happen with public support and with people understanding why this is being done.It is the industry’s obligation to make sure people understand the challenges and what needs to be achieved, Ditlev Engel emphasised.At the session that took place on 22 October, he also presented DNV GL’s Energy Transition Outlook, saying that the report is not offering a selection of scenarios, but that it is a forecast based on scrutinised information and the company’s involvement and expertise in the energy sector.In a short chat with our team after the A new dawn for offshore wins session, Engel summarised the main points of the report. Learn more by watching the video:Reporting: Nadja Skopljak, Rebecca van den Berge – McFedries, Jeroen Tresfon; Editing: Adrijana Buljan, Adnan Durakovićlast_img read more

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Journal retracts study linking a virus to ME

first_img Sharing is caring! Share Share Tweet 11 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share HealthLifestyle Journal retracts study linking a virus to ME by: – December 22, 2011 The study had suggested a virus was linked to CFS/MEA study linking a virus to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as ME, has been withdrawn by the journal which published it.The 2009 study, in Science, suggested a mouse virus, XMRV, was linked to the illness.But in September this year, the study’s authors withdrew some of their findings, saying they were based on “contaminated data”.The journal said it had “lost confidence” in the study.In a statement, editor-in-chief Bruce Alberts, said the journal had decided to fully retracted the paper because of “poor quality control” – and because the findings had not been replicated.It had already published an editorial “expression of concern” in September, saying that the validity of the study was “seriously in question”.‘Too good to be true’The initial research suggested that DNA of the XMRV virus had been found in 64% of CFS patients and just 4% of the general population.But other scientists had been unable to find evidence of the virus and many argued that the most likely explanation was contamination of the laboratory samples.A study also published in Science in September claimed the virus could not be reliably detected in ME patients, even in the labs which originally made the link.The journal says there is evidence of poor quality control in a number of specific experiments reported in the paper, and raises specific concerns about some CFS samples being treated differently to others.Mr Alberts wrote: “Given all the issues, Science has lost confidence in the report and the validity of its conclusions.“We note that the majority of the authors have agreed in principle to retract the report but they have been unable to agree on the wording of their statement.“It is Science’s opinion that a retraction signed by all the authors is unlikely to be forthcoming.“We are therefore editorially retracting the report.“We regret the time and resources that the scientific community has devoted to unsuccessful attempts to replicate these results.”Experts said they were not surprised that the paper had been retracted.Prof Simon Wessely, of the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London said: “The results were simply too good to be true. “CFS is a complex mulfactorial condition with fuzzy boundaries, and almost certainly does not represent any single entity any more that it is caused by any single agent.”But he added: “What is sad however is the degree of opprobrium hurled from some quarters at the scientists who correctly failed to replicate the original observation. “This is not the kind of atmosphere that benefits science or patients.”BBC Newslast_img read more

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