Geoff Parling – preparation for game day

first_img On the hoof: Geoff Parling makes some yardage against Scotland Pre-match rituals“With hours to go, the backs and forwards get together. We’ll talk about specifics. Myself and the locks will talk about lineout moves and the fatties in the front row will be talking about the scrum issues. On the morning of the game, you’ll go for a wander, and if there’s any last minute issues you want to talk through, that’s the time to do it. You’ll do a walkthrough of the lineout. At that stage it’s just fine tuning. After that, you’re together as a team and once you’re in the changing room, it’s game on!”Game-time“Firstly, you always blame the hooker if something goes wrong. Seriously, if I’m calling the lineout, I’ll be looking at the oppositions defence and reacting to what they’re doing. You’ll go through your processes. Are your feet in the correct position? Remember drive the hips through on the engage. It’s the little things you need to get right, especially when there’s extreme fatigue or pressure.”Game-time: Parling contests for the ball against the FrenchBest in the business“The position has evolved and what you’re getting now is hybrid locks. Look at Brodie Retallick, he’s not overly tall or muscular. He’s a mix of both; he does his set-piece work and his work all over the field. There are still enforcers like Jamie Cudmore and Bakkies Botha but there’s more variety now. After the misfortune of a knee injury just days before England‘s game in Cardiff, Leicester Tiger lock Geoff Parling is back in the squad for the visit of Scotland on Saturday. Here he goes into detail about his preparation for games and namechecks the best locks in the business…Training week“In camp everyone has their own specific training schedules but in the forwards there is some crossover. However someone like Billy (Vunipola) might not have to do as many weights as the rest of us, but he’ll do more fitness top-ups, whereas people like myself don’t do so much fitness but do more weights top-ups. It’s not positional, more an individual thing.“We are measured on the yo-yo test or watt bike but if I’m doing fitness work, I don’t do long sessions at one pace. It’s more blast-recover, blast-recover which is more relevant to playing. I like to concentrate on core fitness and lower-limb strength, which is hugely important for locks. That doesn’t just apply to the work around the park, but the scrums, mauls, pick and go’s, and taking the ball stationary. That’s where you’ll feel the benefit of mixing your training up.Graft: Parling and England captain Chris Robshaw put in the fitness workIn a match, I’m told I cover around 8km and work as hard as I can for the team. Most of us forwards enjoy tackling and want to make as many as we can.”Doing the extras“Something we like doing with England is mixing it up. So after a session we’ll do short little pop-ups, ruck work, an attack session, weights, footwork – just keep on learning. All the time you’re reinforcing what you’ve taken on board keeping the basics fresh in your mind.”Doing the extras: Parling feels the pain on the Watt BikeHomework time“I generally use a  laptop to do my research on the opposition players. It’s now a fundamental part of the game, but I don’t like to get carried away with the stats. It’s best to assess the opposition game by game. You do a bit of analysis in your own time but the main focus is what you’re doing and your team.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img England and Lions lock Geoff Parling is one of the elder statesmen of the Stuart Lancaster’s squad. Here he explains how he prepares in Test week “I’ve faced a lot of good locks over the years. Steve Borthwick and Danny Grewcock were a very good pairing. They were a pain to play against. Grewy had a very good set-piece and his ball carrying was direct. I enjoyed playing against Nathan Sharpe. He was the glue for the Wallabies and just did it time and time again. He had so much experience. Andy Boost at Newcastle was the guy l looked up to as a kid and he turned into one of my best friends in the game. Aerially, chasing the kick-offs, Retallick is superb. He has a great engine on him too. As for Paul O’Connell, he has an aura about him. You can’t describe it. He’s a Test match animal. He’ll never take to losing. Ever.Geoff Parling wears the Canterbury Mercury TCR Range. Visit Canterbury.com to show if you’re #CommittedToUnionlast_img read more

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How the Lions can beat the All Blacks in the First Test

first_imgWatertight: The Lions need to make sure their defensive game is perfectThe All Blacks have myriad attacking threats, but not allowing Beauden Barrett exploit space running from deep and stopping Sonny Bill Williams getting the ball away in contact will be key to the visitors chances of success.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREPinpoint the All Blacks weaknessesWeaknesses? You can hear Kiwi fans scoff at such impudence but every side has areas that can be probed and prodded, even the All Blacks. Jerome Kaino and Kieran Read have played less than 80 minutes between them since early April, with respective knee and thumb injuries, and however superhuman the duo are, approaching a Test match of this intensity undercooked is not how Steve Hansen would have envisioned his talismen going toe-to-toe with a grizzled Lions back-row.Comeback trail: Kieran Read still has a protective casing around his injured thumbThe other bold pick from Hansen is 20-year-old Reiko Ioane on the wing. Ioane is prodigiously talented, and seriously rapid – just ask Jack Nowell – but he is inexperienced and Owen Farrell and Conor Murray will be testing his big-match temperament with a series of pin-point bombs in the wide channels.Ignore the statistics TAGS: Highlight The Lions have built up a creditable amount of belief with laughably-inadequate preparation time, but if they had a spare time for reading, it would probably be best to ignore factual pieces of work. Everybody is aware the All Blacks haven’t been beaten since 1994 at Eden Park, but they are unbeaten in on home turf since 2009 against South Africa and in 37 games, they’ve only failed to win by 10 points on five occasions. Staggering.Impregnable: Eden Park is a fortress the All Blacks haven’t lost in since 1994When you look at those numbers, a narrow loss could almost be considered a moral victory, though you’d be hard pressed to hear that rhetoric being spouted from the Lions in the coming weeks. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img They are big underdogs, but to stand a chance there are certain facets of the game the Lions need to perfect, if they are to beat the world’s best team Tomorrow evening sees the most eagerly anticipated Test match of 2017 as the British & Irish Lions face off with the All Blacks in their own formidable back yard; Eden Park. While they were derided after a lacklustre, jet-lagged showing against the Provincial Barbarians, the Lions have morphed into a side with a Scrooge-like defence and an increasingly clinical edge, dispatching with New Zealand’s best team, the Crusaders and suffocating a New Zealand Maori team, crammed with All Blacks, stopping both sides from scoring in the second-half.It’s all set-up for an intriguing clash of styles, with two coaches showing a healthy disregard for each other. So can the Lions do it, and achieve their Everest?Set-piece. Set-piece. Set-piece.Okay, so we’re repeating ourselves, but that’s for a reason. If there’ one area the Lions can confidently approach the First Test, it’s in the scrum and lineout. Three Saracens, allied to 19st County Wexford anchor Tadhg Furlong and 116-cap Welsh captain Alun Wyn Jones point to a tight-five that will bow to no pack, and there will be no inferiority complex packing down opposite Joe Moody, Codie Taylor and Owen Franks.Doing the basics: The Lions have a slick lineout and powerful scrummageThe lineout has also functioned at Test-level and if Jamie George can find his jumpers to give the Lions front-foot ball from first-phase, expect Ben Te’o to ‘truck it up’, as the Lions try to dominate field territory and possession.Defensive RonsealIf the Lions are to nullify the most potent attack in world rugby (their average scoreline at Eden Park since last losing there in 1994 is 35-12), there can be no leaks. They will simply have execute the defensive game of their lives. Despite the All Blacks confidently asserting that they’d worked out Andy Farrell’s high-press defensive system, the way it harried ball-carriers at source against the Crusaders and NZ Maori, would have seen furrowed brows in the New Zealand camp.last_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-Ups

first_img 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-UpsThe 2019 World Cup had plenty of warm-ups taking place so that teams could prepare for the event.England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales will all play several games in the build-up to the tournament whereas the biggest southern hemisphere nations, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa and Argentina, will predominantly use the Rugby Championship as their World Cup warm-up matches.Check out all the matches and when they are set to take place below.2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-UpsEngland Warm-Up MatchesSunday 11 August: England 33-19 WalesSaturday 17 August: Wales 13-6 EnglandSaturday 24 August: England 57-15 IrelandFriday 6 September: England 37-0 ItalyHome and away: Ireland will face Wales at Dublin’s Aviva Stadium and in Cardiff (Getty Images)Ireland Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 10 August: Ireland 29-10 ItalySaturday 24 August: England 57-15 IrelandSaturday 31 August: Wales 17-22 IrelandSaturday 7 September: Ireland 19-10 Wales Scotland Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 17 August: France 32-3 ScotlandSaturday 24 August: Scotland 17-14 FranceSaturday 31 August: Georgia 10-44 ScotlandFriday 6 September: Scotland 36-9 GeorgiaWales Warm-Up MatchesSunday 11 August: England 33-19 WalesSaturday 17 August: Wales 13-6 EnglandSaturday 31 August: Wales 17-22 IrelandSaturday 7 September: Ireland 19-10 WalesCross-Tasman rivalry: New Zealand and Australia will be in opposition once more (Getty Images)Argentina Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 20 July Argentina 16-20 New ZealandSaturday 27 July: Australia 16-10 ArgentinaSaturday 10 August: Argentina 13-46 South AfricaSaturday 17 August: South Africa 24-18 ArgentinaSaturday 7 September: Randwick 0-74 ArgentinaAustralia Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 20 July: South Africa 35-17 AustraliaSaturday 27 July: Australia 16-10 ArgentinaSaturday 10 August: Australia 47-26 New ZealandSaturday 17 August: New Zealand 36-0 AustraliaSaturday 7 September: Australia 34-15 SamoaCanada Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 27 July: USA 47-19 CanadaSaturday 3 August: Fiji 38-13 CanadaFriday 9 August: Tonga 33-23 CanadaSaturday 24 August: Canada 35-38 LeinsterFriday 30 August: Canada 45-13 BC All-StarsSaturday 7 September: Canada 15-20 USAFiji Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 13 July: Fiji 27-10 Maori All BlacksSaturday 20 July: Maori All Blacks 26-17 FijiSaturday 27 July: Japan 34-21 FijiSaturday 3 August: Fiji 38-13 CanadaSaturday 10 August: Fiji 10-3 SamoaSaturday 31 August: Fiji 29-19 TongaFrance Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 17 August: France 32-3 ScotlandSaturday 24 August: Scotland 17-14 FranceFriday 30 August: France 47-19 Italy Expand 2019 Rugby World Cup Qualified Teams Rugby World Cup Venues Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… Georgia Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 31 August: Georgia 10-44 ScotlandFriday 6 September: Scotland 36-9 GeorgiaItaly Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 10 August: Ireland 29-10 ItalySaturday 17 August: Italy 85-15 RussiaFriday 30 August: France 47-19 ItalyFriday 6 September: England 37-0 ItalyJapan Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 27 July: Japan 34-21 FijiSaturday 3 August: Japan 41-7 TongaSaturday 10 August: USA 20-34 JapanFriday 6 September: Japan 7-41 South AfricaNamibia Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 24th August: Sharks Invitation XV 0-43 NamibiaSaturday 31st August: Namibia 28-22 Southern KingsSaturday 7th September: Namibia 21-17 Southern KingsNew Zealand Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 20 July Argentina  16-20 New ZealandSaturday 27 July: New Zealand 16-16 South AfricaSaturday 10 August: Australia 47-26 New ZealandSaturday 17 August: New Zealand 36-0 AustraliaSaturday 7 September: New Zealand 92-7 TongaRussia Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 17 August: Italy 85-15 RussiaTuesday 27 August: Russia 22-35 Jersey RedsSaturday 7 September: Russia 14-42 ConnachtSamoa Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 27 July: Samoa 25-17 TongaSaturday 3 August: USA 13-10 SamoaSaturday 10 August: Fiji 10-3 SamoaSaturday 31 August: New Zealand Heartland XV 19-36 SamoaSaturday 7 September: Australia 34-15 SamoaSouth Africa Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 20 July: South Africa 35-17 AustraliaSaturday 27 July: New Zealand 16-16 South AfricaSaturday 10 August: Argentina 13-46 South AfricaSaturday 17 August: South Africa 24-18 ArgentinaFriday 6 September: Japan 7-41 South AfricaTonga Warm-Up Matches Saturday 27 July: Samoa 25-17 TongaSaturday 3 August: Japan 41-7 TongaFriday 9 August: Tonga 33-23 CanadaSaturday 31 August: Fiji 29-19 TongaSaturday 7 September: New Zealand 92-7 TongaUruguay Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 7 September: Uruguay 24-35 Argentina XVUSA Warm-Up MatchesSaturday 27 July: USA 47-19 CanadaSaturday 3 August: USA 13-10 SamoaSaturday 10 August: USA 20-34 JapanFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Rugby World Cup Venues Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 What you need to know about the 12… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Respect: England clap Wales off after defeating them in a World Cup warm-up (Getty Images) Rugby World Cup Groups A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… See which teams have qualified for the 2019… 2019 Rugby World Cup Qualified Teams Rugby World Cup Groups Collapse Expand Expand Take a look at all the matches that will act as warm-ups for the 2019 World Cup in Japan Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Dangers of Rugby’s Crocodile Roll – by a player whose career was curtailed by one

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It’s more than three years since @benjaminryan wrote this on injuries at the breakdown – and after Jack Willis’s horrible injury it’s just as relevant https://t.co/9DjyrTJrMp— Rugby World (@Rugbyworldmag) February 13, 2021Dussartre’s own experience had completely changed the way he watches rugby. “Every ruck, even though people wouldn’t be getting injured, you’re expecting the worse. That is something which follows me now. You’re fearful when you see someone getting twisted into an uncomfortable position.”He is adamant that rucks need to be reformed, that they are fundamentally broken. “The rucks now are a mess. If you want to find a penalty at every ruck, I think you can.“There is obviously a lot of development around concussion, which is a real concern, but if you’re really concerned about player welfare you need to pay attention to the rucks.”Referees face a difficult task with the speed and complexity of the breakdown, but for Dussartre there are some possible solutions, and his first idea is a simple one. “At some point you have to reward a good jackler. If they are first, in a good position, and have the ball, then maybe defenders have to be there more quickly. That’s all.”Jack Willis is taken off on a stretcher during the Italy game (Getty Images)There is a paradox to being an effective jackler, that the more closely you follow the laws, the more vulnerable you are. Dussartre was injured while executing a legal attempt at a turnover, entering through the gate, supporting his own bodyweight, and showing a clear release. He believes that to avoid injuries, referees must better enforce the existing rules.“There are so many grey areas specifically in rucks, (but) maybe it’s also being more careful about players coming in from the side. You can’t croc roll a player otherwise. I would say the easiest way for referees to deal with it is to ensure people are not entering from the side.”Dangers of Rugby’s Crocodile Roll – The punishmentIt shouldn’t just be referees who assume responsibility for player safety, Dussartre believes fellow professionals should look out for each other. This February has seen a string of red cards, with two in the opening rounds of the Six Nations and five in a single Premiership weekend.“Players need to be more aware of how dangerous it can be, that’s my perspective,” says Dussartre. Sebastian Negri seemed suitably apologetic about his involvement in Willis’s injury, going over to the medical cart to see the Wasps flanker and tweeting the next morning. Etienne Dussartre tells Jacob Whitehead why he believes players should be red-carded for croc rolls Etienne Dussartre takes on Munster during his Racing 92 days in 2017 (Inpho) “I was defending, trying to get the ball, and two players came in from the side. One grabbed my head, the other my upper body, as well as trapping my leg. I was completely stuck, I couldn’t do anything.“It was tough because I knew an injury was going to happen, and I tried to resist a little bit, but my knee basically collapsed. The physio and the doctor came, and they knew it was over for me.”The prognosis for his swollen and buckled knee wasn’t good. Three of his four knee ligaments – the ACL, MCL, and PCL – were completely torn. He had surgery five days later.Dangers of Rugby’s Crocodile Roll – The controversyWhy are we talking about this now? The serious knee injury England back-row Jack Willis suffered against Italy in the second weekend of the Six Nations has ignited a debate about the crocodile roll’s legality.Jean de Villiers, James Horwill and Paul O’Connell have all suffered injuries in similar incidents while former England and Fiji Sevens coach Ben Ryan has been calling for the technique to be banned for years.center_img A quick message to Jack Willis. So sorry about what happened yesterday. Just Horrible and never nice to see. Myself and all the @Federugby boys are wishing you all the bestI hope to see you back on the field again soon. Take care and we all know you will be back stronger Seb pic.twitter.com/wCYisXxllp— Sebastian Negri (@slnegri04) February 14, 2021There’s an extent to which every party involved in rugby must bear some responsibility for the crocodile roll, the players and referees on the field, but also the coaches off it. In a game of split-second decisions, with masses of over 100kg being thrown about the field, players do what they’ve been trained to do.“When I was younger and playing in the (Racing) academy we had a wrestling coach. This is something they did quite a lot, integrating wrestling skills into rugby, and the croc roll was one of these techniques.“I remember every time we did this that people were worried because we knew someone might hurt their back, or get their elbow injured, it would be painful after the session.” Dangers of Rugby’s Crocodile Roll – The incident“When I look back at the video it seems like it’s a really quick incident, but in my mind it lasts for much longer.”It was in the opening minutes of a Top 14 relegation battle that a crocodile roll caused Etienne Dussartre’s knee to explode. His Grenoble side were embroiled in a desperate scrap for survival and this visit to bottom-placed Perpignan in March 2019 was their chance to haul themselves out of danger.For Dussartre, who was 26 at the time, there was also a degree of personal pressure. “I had already signed a contract for a ProD2 team next year,” he explains. “I was still wondering whether if I played well, maybe I could find another deal, maybe even stay at Grenoble if we stayed in the first division.”His career to that point had been a constant battle to establish himself in the Top 14. A ball-handling centre, Dussartre came through the academy at Racing 92 in the same cohort as Virimi Vakatawa and Camille Chat, learning his trade in the first team alongside the galacticos of Dan Carter, Johnny Sexton and Joe Rokocoko.Opportunities were understandably limited and a move to Grenoble followed, with Dussartre playing a key part in their promotion to the French top flight in his debut season there. It was his side’s first year back in the big league and he’d finally had a run of starting opportunities in the No 13 jersey.Perpignan’s small stadium was a bear-pit that evening, the stands emblazoned with raucous voices in red and gold. The home side were hanging onto a 10-7 lead with 15 minutes gone when Dussartre spotted an opportunity for a steal in the Perpignan half. “If we apply the law as it is, I’m sure the game can be refereed that way any more.””Players really do need to change their behaviour.”After a weekend full of red cards, @Nigelrefowens explains why things can’t continue as they have been.#RugbyTonight pic.twitter.com/eengFOlxbl— Rugby on BT Sport (@btsportrugby) February 21, 2021Behaviours are manifestations of habit, and if players are to stop performing dangerous crocodile rolls, Dussartre believes they need to be punished. Discipline should be stern.“For me it’s a red card. If you want to educate players so that they understand, then the red card is the most efficient way. You should in addition ban players for a few weeks, or if the referee doesn’t see it they should be cited afterwards.“My injury, maybe if you took the two players separately, then I wouldn’t have been injured. But bad luck shouldn’t play a part in such significant injuries. It shouldn’t be outcome driven. You need to make sure that there is a rule for players to follow.”Dangers of Rugby’s Crocodile Roll – The aftermathDussartre is still living with the consequences of his injury. He couldn’t sleep for the first month and that summer had to uproot his life to fulfil his contract at ProD2 side Angoulême.After ten months of difficult recovery, including two different spells at the rehabilitation centre CERS Capbreton, he returned to rugby. Yet he was stepping onto the field not knowing if he should really be on it.A week before, his surgeon had revealed that the graft to repair the ACL hadn’t been entirely successful, and that another surgery may need to follow.“He told me that I could still play, but if I kept training at the same frequency and intensity, what I needed to do to play professionally, in three or four years I’d have a very bad knee, with a lot of arthritis.“It was full of emotion. I was really happy to play, but I felt weird because the doctor told me it was my choice, and I was not entirely comfortable with that.“My first game was not that good, I was hesitating during the match because I didn’t really have the agreement of the surgeons. I could see that my level was not the same, that I was different, and wasn’t enjoying it as much. Now I knew what it was like to get seriously injured; what I was putting on the line.”Etienne Dussartre in action for France U20 in 2013 (AFP/Getty Images)After three or four more games, and with the season then suspended due to coronavirus, Dussartre decided to stop. “Rugby was not everything for me. I’ve always been careful and kept studying, so when Covid came I had some introspection about my situation, where I wanted to go and where I was. I applied to the Cambridge Judge Business School and got admitted, which was a great achievement for me.”There is one rugby itch left to scratch. “If I could play in the Varsity Match I would be more than happy. That would be great. I can still play, but training every day, that’s not an option for me with my knee. Rugby is special and I’m really grateful for my career, even though it wasn’t the most successful.”So what next for the crocodile roll? Dussartre has offered numerous suggestions for a way forward and, if governing bodies listen, it shouldn’t be a debate that needs to arise again, when another knee is in tatters and another promising career threatened. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Transitions for Episcopal Church, DFMS staff

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing August 19, 2012 at 8:39 pm Believing that the Church, parishes and church entities should not be run like “businesses” at some level is folly. If the Church had been run more efficiently like effective businesses we wouldn’t have some of the financial issues that we have. We are in the “business” of spreading God’s word and serving in His name. Like any effective secular business we must account for what we have for mission and use it wisely. Having efficient and effective structures in place can allow for very productive ministry and mission. I think that Jesus did have a very effective “Senior Management Team” in His apostles and followers who would go on to spread His teachings. It’s about time that our Church learns to more effectively navigate in today’s business enviornment so as to have the greatest impact. Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA August 17, 2012 at 4:35 pm Don’t re locate to Washington DC….the TEC is politicised enoughBUT DO MOVE! Some have been asking of thios for years Rector Washington, DC Rev.Thomas C. Jackson says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab People Catherine Cummings says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rhonda Muir says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC August 16, 2012 at 4:30 pm I hope the irony is not lost on our decision makers that our church has laid off our Officer for Environmental and Economic Justice in the middle of the greatest environmental and economic crisis that our nation has ever faced. I mentioned this in my homily on Sunday and there were gasps from the congregation. Foolish? Short-sighted? Fiscally responsible? Woe be it to us who consent to running a church like a business: we will get what we pay for. Rector Bath, NC Alan M. Shaver says: August 15, 2012 at 8:53 pm I am struck by the “business tone” describing the changes, particularly “redefining positions”. If you have not had that happen to you, you have no idea of how painful it is. The Church marches on, but suddenly you are dropped off the planet! One week you know where you belong and the next week, you don’t really belong anywhere.I realize there is a need for the Church to operate with business principles but we are also called to be different from the business world as usual. “Business has a profit motive. Church has a prophet motive.” Good to know the difference. I don’t think Jesus had a Senior Management Team. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Leslie Jordan says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET August 20, 2012 at 4:09 pm There are many cities throughout the US that are capable of supporting a move by the Church Center. Besides the ones mentioned, there is Nashville (home to the UMC and SBC), Louisville (PCUSA), Cincinnati / Northern KY, among a few. While politics is in every location, my suggestion would be to find a home in the heart of the country. And yes, unfortunately these are “business decisions”. That’s the job of the COO. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA September 7, 2012 at 8:36 pm Whatever the realities behind these changes the language of this document is appalling. It’s dishonest on every level. Rector Albany, NY Transitions for Episcopal Church, DFMS staff Doug Desper says: Rich McDonough says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET August 15, 2012 at 10:17 pm The press release says: “Four departmental areas have been affected by the staffing reorientation: communication, human resources, legal and mission. These positions have been affected either by staff realignment, RIF, or a reduction in hours in the areas of congregational development, environment, Episcopal News Service, human resources, and legal.”One of the things I heard clearly at General Convention was a desire for a robust communication function. Is that being translated into staff cuts in that area? We cannot survive any more losses in the communications area! Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Carole Wageman says: Terence Kelshaw says: Rector Belleville, IL Lisa Fox says: Posted Aug 15, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest August 17, 2012 at 6:58 pm I’m thrilled to hear about the prospect of sharing staff and space with the ELCA – we are truly “Called to Common Mission.” It would be great to see the church on a national level “live into” that call and provide additional inspiration for collaboration on the local level. Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ken Ritter says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY August 16, 2012 at 1:21 pm (oops) those who know Jesus only through the media? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing August 17, 2012 at 5:23 pm Many years ago back in the late 1960s moving the Episcopal HQ from NY City to Indianapolis, Indiana was considered. Costs were (and still are) lower in Indianapolis than NY City. Indianapolis is in the middle of country. I believe the Eli Lilly family offered to bear some of the costs. Of course, this idea was rejected. Since then Indianapolis has experienced a transformation, building a modern convention center and renovating the downtown area. It has transformed itself into a vibrant city. May be it’s time to take another look?Now everything is going more and more to online media it is no longer necessary to be in a huge commercial city like NY to be effective in communications. Teleconferencing is also a lot cheaper and easier than traveling to another city with all the inherent expenses and travel delays. Let’s move into the 21st century.Another thought: those so-called “mega auditorium, God-of-prosperity churches” are losing members and falling apart; for example, Schuller’s Crystal Cathedral has been sold, and Rick Warren’s Saddleback Church has been racked by money problems and scandals. Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC August 15, 2012 at 6:00 pm Well that sure doesn’t make a whole lot of sense for a church that is supposed to be trying to reverse a downward trend in attendance:* less resources for congregational development,* less work to protect God’s creation (environment),* less communications from the Episcopal News Service, and (my favorite mistake)* fewer legal resources (because we are so not going to ever be sued by anyone again, especially not anyone in South Carolina).There’s a mistake here: we are not losing members because we can’t afford to do “mission” at the parish of diocesan level. If it were a matter of money, Trinity Wall Street would have been a megachurch decades ago. Once again we are mistaking structural change for significant change. And once again we will look back on this move and call it a mistake. John McCann says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel August 16, 2012 at 9:08 am A couple of comments responding to some of the comments already posted:1) If you have ever been to the Trinity Church, Wall Street retreat center in Cornwall, CT you will know how far away this is from any place. Savings in rental cost would be more than lost with the expense of transportation to and from the center.2) Locating in Washington, DC is not a good idea. First of all, the Washington area is among the most expensive for living costs anywhere in the country; for another, it will be really healthy for the Church Staff to be located away from the East Coast where a very limited view of the world exists. Better to be exposed to others whose lives do not revolve around government. Joslyn Ogden Schaefer says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (15) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS August 15, 2012 at 5:51 pm Singo your “outplaced” staffers are going to be 99%ers like most of the rest of us. You wont know what its like until you have walked in our shoes.If you are looking for space, Trinity Wall Street is trying to get rid of their retreat site. Neighbors in Cornwall are afraid its going to become subdivisions, why not talkto Trinity, and see if you could locate your staff there. Check it oout through Trinity Real Estate,they have tons of money. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Reverend Dr. Brent Was says: [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Episcopal Church and the church-wide Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS) staff are undergoing transitions to re-orient not only the work of the church-wide staff but also where that work will be conducted.The transitions are primarily, but not completely, a result of actions approved at General Convention 2012 in July. Many are budget-based and most are intended to be responsive to the priorities established at General Convention.“The decisions on the re-orientation and transitions were made by senior management, particularly in affected departments, working as a team,” noted Chief Operating Officer Bishop Stacy Sauls. “The overriding concern has been to make decisions that serve the church as a whole as it engages God’s mission at the most local levels.”Sauls emphasized that the predominant focus is on a redesign. “We have been reviewing and talking about seriously redesigning what we, as a staff, do and how we do it in order to meet the needs of the church in different circumstances than what our current structures were designed to address,” he said. “The whole church is being called to restructure for mission. We as the DFMS staff must engage this work faithfully.”Among the areas scrutinized by the senior management team, Sauls continued, are work responsibilities, parameters of the ministry offerings of a denominational headquarters, staff locations, and implementation of priorities of General Convention particularly around the Five Marks of Mission. The areas of focus at present are office locations, current staffing, and re-visioning the worked done by the church-wide staff.In addition, Sauls is continuing talks with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) on various mutual innovations, particularly in sharing staff and space. While staffing and office locations are being addressed first, there will be a further examination into other options, Sauls stressed, including joint mission efforts and initiatives.Physical surroundingsThe Office of Federal Ministries, located in Washington, D.C., already has moved to quarters on the grounds of Washington National Cathedral. This July move has resulted in rent reduction and decreases in other facility costs.Sauls is working with the international real estate group Cushman & Wakefield to investigate office space for church-wide staff, as announced by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in June and subsequently endorsed by General Convention in July.A lease arrangement is expected to be completed shortly for unused space on the sixth floor of the Church Center in New York City, thereby generating revenue for DFMS.StaffingIn the staffing areas, the senior management team is analyzing the reorientation of staff for optimum results and to more effectively address the church’s needs and priorities in mission.“It is also imperative to fulfill the commitments made by the presiding bishop’s budget proposal to General Convention, which became the basis for the Five Marks of Mission budget which was approved, to reduce the size of the staff to keep as many resources as possible available at local levels,” Sauls said.As such, the reduction in force (RIF) translates to the cutting of 10.25 full-time equivalent positions, five of which are unfilled. The remaining 5.25 full-time equivalent positions are located in the Los Angeles, New York City and Seattle offices. There also has been a redefining of some existing positions to better meet evolving needs and priorities. In a few cases, redefined jobs will no longer be held by existing staff members and a search process will begin for those positions with some jobs posted by Labor Day.• Four departmental areas have been affected by the staffing reorientation: communication, human resources, legal and mission. These positions have been affected either by staff realignment, RIF, or a reduction in hours in the areas of congregational development, environment, Episcopal News Service, human resources, and legal.• A creative arrangement with The Episcopal Network for Stewardship (TENS) provides for the DFMS officer for stewardship to transition to TENS as a staff member.• The budget and resolutions adopted by General Convention have prompted a refocusing and rebuilding in domestic poverty work and the Development Office.“This is an understandably difficult time for the members of the staff,” Sauls said.“It is hard for us to say goodbye to people we care about and people who have served the church self-sacrificially over the years, something for which all of us in the church should be very grateful.”Severance packages, marked both by responsibility and compassion, have been provided to departing staff including the offer of professional outplacement services. All staff affected by the transition were notified in person by their supervisors. All staff transitions will be completed by Aug. 29. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rhonda Muir says: Rector Shreveport, LA August 23, 2012 at 9:07 am It will do our leadership and resource officers some good to get away from that small island called Manhattan. The unfortunate reality is that there is often a parochial and somewhat elitist cosmopolitan tone that is generated there wherein the rest of the country is looked upon as mere flyover country. Perhaps rubbing elbows with the real mainstream of America will help change the unfortunate realities that have dragged our Church down for the last decades. August 16, 2012 at 1:20 pm I’d like to read something about evangilism from the DMS……isn’t that what Jesus would have us do, share about him to people who do not know him? We have other bodies to be his hands in the world through kind help to people in need. How will this reorganization and downsizing better prepare the church to reach out tolast_img read more

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La formación de un ministerio para los HBT en El…

first_imgLa formación de un ministerio para los HBT en El Salvador Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Una mujer enciende velas por las víctimas de crímenes de odio durante un oficio de recordación celebrado el 14 de marzo durante la primera conferencia que se celebra sobre los derechos humanos de homosexuales, bisexuales y transexuales en la Universidad de América Central. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS[Episcopal News Service – San Salvador, El Salvador] En 2007, mientras trabajaba en la biblioteca y estudiaba psicología en la Universidad de América Central, aquí en San Salvador, Cruz Torres descubrió la Iglesia Episcopal.Estaba catalogando the Anglican Review, un folleto de la Iglesia Anglicana en Guatemala. Mientras lo leía y luego investigaba sobre la Iglesia Episcopal, se enteró de la elección, en 2003 en Nuevo Hampshire, de Gene Robinson, el primer sacerdote abiertamente homosexual en ser electo obispo, así como de la apertura de la Iglesia hacia personas homosexuales, bisexuales y transexuales (HBT o LGBT por su sigla en inglés).“Y me pregunté si había una iglesia anglicana aquí”, dijo él durante una reciente entrevista con ENS.Torres terminó por encontrar la parroquia de San Juan Evangelista de la Iglesia Episcopal Anglicana de El Salvador y, al cabo de tres domingos, se acercó al Rdo. Luis Serrano, el rector de la iglesia.“Le dije, ‘bien, Padre, yo no quiero mentirle. Quiero decirle la verdad. Soy católico romano. He leído acerca de los derechos de los HBT en la Iglesia Episcopal. Soy gay. Soy cristiano, y quiero vivir mi vida espiritual en un lugar que no me condene’”, contó Torres durante la entrevista en San Juan Evangelista.Serrano respondió: “Nuestras puertas están abiertas”.Eso fue en noviembre de 2007. No mucho después de la llegada de Torres, una pareja de dos hombres encontró la iglesia. Y nuevo vino otro homosexual y luego otro, y finalmente el número ascendió a seis. Martín Barahona, el obispo de El Salvador, sugirió que el grupo ayudara a la diócesis a comenzar un ministerio sobre la diversidad sexual, pero el grupo rehusó, dijo Torres. “Dijimos ‘no, El Salvador no está listo aún”.Dos años más tarde, el grupo se reunía regularmente los sábados por la tarde y había doblado su número.“Éramos 12, y comenzamos a conversar acerca de nuestras experiencias en las [otras] iglesias, y dijimos que tal vez era el momento de llamar e invitar a la gente a enterarse”, dijo Torres. “La mitad de las personas que venían querían cambiar [su orientación sexual], pero esa no era nuestra visión o nuestra misión”.La Iglesia Episcopal Anglicana de El Salvador es una de las cinco iglesias de la Iglesia Anglicana de la Región Central de América, que también incluye Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panamá y Guatemala, que ha creado un pacto con la Iglesia Episcopal.  La diversidad del ministerio de El Salvador es la única en su clase entre las iglesias episcopales de la región, puntualizó Torres.(Existen otros dos ministerios de plena inclusión en El Salvador, uno es la Iglesia de la Comunidad Metropolitana y el otro es una iglesia protestante evangélica).Eso no quiere decir que la situación de las personas HBT sea particularmente diferente en El Salvador. Los sectores conservadores, incluidos la Iglesia y los medios de prensa, definen a la homosexualidad como algo malo y como un pecado, y las familias de las personas HBT son llevadas a creer eso, lo cual a veces afecta la manera en que tratan a sus hijos e hijas, dijo Torres.“Sus familias creen eso porque es lo que les han dicho los fanáticos”, señaló él. Las personas HBT deben mostrarles a los miembros de su familia cómo les gustaría que los trataran, añadió. “Eso es la cosa fundamental que hacemos aquí [en el ministerio]; las personas necesitan estar a bien consigo mismas.La misión del grupo no es convertir a los homosexuales en heterosexuales, como es la misión de algunas iglesias, sino más bien ayudar a los miembros a conciliarse con sus sentimientos, explicó Torres. “Dijimos: ‘Dios te ama como eres. Si eres gay, es porque tal es Su voluntad, y tienes una misión en la vida’”.Desde que se creó el Ministerio de la Diversidad Sexual en 2009, un ministerio diocesano, el grupo ha crecido hasta llegar a tener entre 25 y 30 personas —católicos romanos, metodistas, mormones, evangélicos— muchos de los cuales ya han sido recibidos en la Iglesia. Pero apuntó que evangelizar tampoco es la misión del grupo.Evento históricoPese a los avances en derechos humanos, los HBT en El Salvador y a través de la región con frecuencia enfrentan discriminación y violencia, temas que hace poco se abordaron durante el la primera conferencia que se haya celebrado en El Salvador sobre derechos humanos de los HBT, la cual tuvo lugar los días 14 y 15 de marzo en la Universidad de América Central.El grupo de San Juan Evangelista estuvo bien representado en la conferencia auspiciada por Asistencia Legal para la Diversidad Sexual El Salvador y la Fundación SHARE, una organización sin fines de lucro que promueve los derechos humanos y civiles. Más de 1.000 personas asistieron a la conferencia de dos días, entre ellos miembros del Comité sobre Diversidad de Género de la parroquia de San Juan Evangelista de la Iglesia Episcopal Anglicana de El Salvador.“Ésta es la primera vez que esto ha sucedido en El Salvador, un lugar donde por ser abiertamente gay, lesbiana o transexual podían matarte”, dijo Olivia Amadón, quien asistió a la conferencia como representante de la Fundación Cristosal, una organización de carácter religioso para el desarrollo comunitario y la promoción de los derechos humanos que tiene sus orígenes en las iglesias Episcopal y Anglicana. “De manera que resulta muy inspirador ver que organizaciones que apoyan los derechos de los HBT se reúnen y enfrentan los problemas”.La conferencia incluyó oradores, paneles y debates que abordaron: lo que significa ser un HBT en El Salvador; la capacitación de la comunidad a través del proceso político; comunidades de fe inclusivas como promotores de los derechos humanos; el uso del derecho internacional para combatir la impunidad y el acceso a la justicia como un derecho humano.(En los últimos años, las Naciones Unidas ha empezado  a enmarcar los derechos de los HBT como derechos humanos básicos).Oradores y panelistas, dijo Amadón, se refirieron a los derechos de los HBT como derechos humanos que deben ser protegidos, pero la interrogante sigue siendo: ¿Qué rumbo toma el diálogo de aquí en adelante?”La rama ejecutiva del gobierno de El Salvador ha aprobado un decreto que prohíbe la discriminación en el sector público por motivo de identidad sexual, pero ese decreto no se extiende al sector privado y puede fácilmente ser revocado, y las leyes que protegen a las mujeres y los niños de la violencia no se extienden a las personas HBT, dijo Amadón.Aunque la policía ya está siendo adiestrada para mostrarse sensible [ante estos casos], las mujeres transexuales siguen siendo golpeadas en las calles, dijo Amadón. “La ley no resolverá [el problema de] la discriminación, pero habría menos impunidad cuando se produzcan las violaciones”.La aprobación de una ley es un primer paso; el siguiente es promover la conciencia [social], de manera que disminuyan la homofobia y la discriminación sistémicas, señaló.Es un odio que ha estado presente durante generaciones, dijo Salvador Ramos, de 22 años, en una entrevista en la conferencia.“Se trata de cambiar la psicología de las masas”, afirmó Néstor Urquilla, de 41 años, añadiendo que cuando más hay unos 3.000 episcopales en El Salvador (la población total es de 6 millones).Además de ser la primera conferencia sobre derechos de los HBT en El Salvador, la reunión de marzo resultó importante para esclarecer una situación que debe cambiarse, dijo Torres. Ese cambio no puede venir del gobierno, sino a través de los empeños de la sociedad en la base, añadió.En general, los miembros heterosexuales de la Iglesia Episcopal en El Salvador se han mostrado solidarios con el grupo, pero eso no significa que no haya habido resistencia, dijo Wendy Castillo, de 28 años, que es miembro del grupo de la diversidad.“No todo ha sido color de rosa” afirmó ella, añadiendo que aún queda trabajo por hacer.Cuando Torres y las otras personas de la comunidad HBT comenzaron a asistir a los oficios de San Juan Evangelista, la parroquia se mostró receptiva a su presencia, pero dos o tres familias se fueron, dijo Serrano.Torres, que ahora tiene 30 años, le reveló primero su identidad sexual a un sacerdote católico romano en confesión, cuando tenía 18 años. Aunque, según dijo, el sacerdote no lo rechazó, él no se sintió acogido en la iglesia y estuvo sin hogar espiritual de 2005 a 2007, cuando encontró la Iglesia Episcopal.“Es la voluntad de Dios que esté aquí” dijo Torres. “Yo me acepto y estoy feliz conmigo mismo, desde que encontré ese último pedazo de mi corazón”.“Me sentía feliz de ser gay, pero me quedaba esa inconformidad en el corazón”, concluyó Torres. “Cuando vine aquí pude ser cristiano y ser gay”.—Lynette Wilson es redactora  y reportera de Episcopal News Service radicada actualmente en San Salvador, El Salvador.Traducción de Vicente Echerri Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Por Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 27, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

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El Consejo trata de dar esperanza y liderazgo ‘a los…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Executive Council, Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel El Consejo trata de dar esperanza y liderazgo ‘a los que no están a la mesa’ El organismo ejecutivo concluye su reunión de mitad del trienio con una larga lista de resoluciones Executive Council February 2014 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] Los dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana, la trata de personas y los nombres “peyorativos” de equipos deportivos se encontraron entre los temas que el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal abordó el 7 de febrero durante las ultimas sesiones de su reunión en esta ciudad.El Consejo declaró su solidaridad con los dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana, quienes “han sido convertidos esencialmente en apátridas” cuando el tribunal constitucional de la República Dominicana dictaminó, el 23 de septiembre de 2013, que cualquier niño nacido de inmigrantes haitianos en la República Dominicana no tenía derecho a la ciudadanía. El tribunal también le ordenó a las autoridades dominicanas que auditaran los registros civiles hasta junio de 1929 para determinar, según informa el diario New York Times quien carece de derecho a la ciudadanía.Diciendo que el dictamen del tribunal podría dar lugar a una “tragedia potencial en gran escala”, la resolución del Consejo insta a la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia a alentar a Estados Unidos y los asociados ecuménicos e interreligiosos de la iglesia a que aboguen a favor de esos dominicanos.  [La resolución] insta también a la Red Episcopal de Política Pública de esa oficina a educar y alertar a los miembros de la Iglesia respecto a ese problema, y a alentar la defensa [de esa causa] dentro de sus iglesias y comunidades.También animaba a la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori a encabezar una delegación que fuera a la República Dominicana, junto con asociados ecuménicos e interreligiosos, a recabar información precisa para luego informar al Consejo.El Rvdmo. Julio Holguín, obispo de la Diócesis [Episcopal] de la República Dominicana le dijo a ENS poco después de darse a conocer el dictamen del tribunal que “el tribunal constitucional ha cometido un gran error con este fallo, señalando que muchos de los afectados eran descendientes de inmigrantes, la mayoría de los cuales vinieron a la República Dominicana por acuerdo de los dos gobiernos —dominicano y haitiano— para trabajar principalmente en el corte de caña.Debe coordinarse la labor sobre la trata de personasEl Consejo aprobó ratificar el compromiso de la 77ª. Convención General de combatir la trata de personas tal como quedo explícito en la Resolución D-042. Lelanda Lee, presidente del Comité Permanente Conjunto de Promoción Social e Interconexión, dijo que había llegado a ser obvio para ese comité que la labor que se necesitaba respecto a ese problema es tan compleja que se precisaba de un comité que la coordinara.La resolución instruía a la Obispa Primada y a la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados a nombrar el comité para el 31 de marzo “a fin de garantizar la implementación, efectiva, concienzuda y cooperativa, de las políticas adoptadas por la 77ª. Convención General”.Lee dijo que la resolución encaja con lo que el comité cree que es su papel de “brindarle esperanza y liderazgo a los que no se encuentra a la mesa”.Nombres de equipos ‘peyorativos o denostativos’En otra resolución auspiciada por el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Promoción Social e Interconexión, el Consejo se sumó a lo que ya se ha convertido en una campaña nacional que ha llegado hasta la Casa Blanca de convencer al equipo de los Pieles Rojas [Redskins] de Washington de que cambie de nombre.La resolución denuncia el uso de “equipos deportivos con nombres peyorativos o denostativos”, recordándole a la Iglesia su compromiso del pacto bautismal, de luchar por la justicia y la paz entre todos los pueblos y respetar la dignidad de todo ser humano. Los miembros [del Consejo] sostuvieron su llamado a ponerle fin al uso de tales nombres como parte del empeño de la Iglesia, a lo largo de muchos años, en combatir el racismo.La resolución le pide a las organizaciones atléticas en todos los niveles a seguir la política de la Asociación Nacional Atlética Universitaria de penar los programas deportivos universitarios que usen nombres de equipos, imágenes, mascotas y conductas peyorativos o denostativos. Los miembros también le pidieron a las diócesis e iglesias locales que aborden el asunto de los nombres de equipos peyorativos o denostativos si sus equipos deportivos de escuelas y comunidades locales usan tales nombres.La resolución insta también a la Liga Nacional de Fútbol Americano (NFL) a “no permitir que un evento importante de fútbol americano, como el Súper Tazón, tenga lugar en Washington, D.C.”.Terry Star, miembro del Consejo e indoamericano lakota proveniente de Dakota del Norte, le agradeció al Consejo, a través de sus mensajes en Twitter, su preocupación por el uso de tales nombres.“Yo he estado luchando con este problema desde que estaba en la escuela secundaria hace 22 años”, dijo él.Plan de sostenibilidad para la IX ProvinciaEl Consejo convino en una campaña de 18 años que un informe define como “un plan audaz con el valioso objetivo de establecer modelos de misión y ministerio sostenibles y autosuficientes para las diócesis de la IX Provincia”.Martha Gardner, que preside el  Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Misión Mundial del Consejo, dijo que el problema de la sostenibilidad “había estado surgiendo a lo largo de muchos años”.El equipo del proyecto Segunda Marca de la Misión del personal denominacional recomendó el plan al Consejo con la sugerencia de que se concentrara en las diócesis que ya han avanzado en sus gestiones de superar la dependencia del modelo histórico de las subvenciones en bloque de la Iglesia. La Diócesis de la República Dominicana, con su objetivo autodefinido de lograr la autosuficiencia para 1015, será el foco inicial, seguida por la Diócesis de Honduras y luego la de Colombia.En la medida en que cada diócesis alcance la autosuficiencia del programa de subvenciones en bloque, se comprometerá a su vez en trabajar con las otras diócesis para ayudarles a alcanzar el mismo objetivo.“El compromiso general del dinero de la subvención en bloque del presupuesto denominacional se mantendría a fin de proporcionar réditos para esta labor de desarrollo, y para que a la próxima diócesis que le toque en turno se comprometa a fondo en la labor de la autosuficiencia y la sostenibilidad”, dijo el equipo en su informe.El equipo dijo también que tal proyecto a largo plazo exigirá “compromiso, confianza y flexibilidad” según “el panorama y las realidades puedan ajustarse y cambiar a lo largo del tiempo”, lo cual exigiría alguna especie de acuerdo pactado susceptible de renovarse mediante una renegociación periódica.En otros asuntos, el Consejo:*Dio su consentimiento a la selección hecha por el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Planificación y Disposiciones acerca de la selección de la Diócesis de Texas como el sitio para la celebración de la 79ª. Convención General en 2018.La selección debe ser aprobada también por la 78ª. Convención en Salt Lake City en 2015.El Rdo. Canónigo Michael Barlowe, funcionario ejecutivo de la Iglesia, respondió las preguntas de los miembros respecto a celebrar la convención en una diócesis que históricamente ha estado entre aquellas que dan una pequeña cantidad de sus ingresos al presupuesto denominacional. Él dijo que antes de incluir la diócesis en la lista de posibles lugares, él y la Obispa Primada y la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados hablarían con el obispo Andy Doyle y se impondrían de su “compromiso personal… en conducir la Diócesis de Texas hacia la plena participación en la vida de la Iglesia Episcopal incluido el cumplimiento con sus responsabilidades económicas y de otro tipo”.Ese compromiso, agregó, se reiteró durante las reuniones entre el grupo que selecciona los sitios [de la Convención] y el liderazgo diocesano. “Nos sentimos satisfechos de que hemos explorado esto en detalle”, dijo Barlowe, añadiendo que el Comité Permanente está “encantado” con la “trayectoria” de participación que se le explicó.La Iglesia Episcopal le pide a las diócesis que contribuyan al presupuesto denominacional con el 19 por ciento de sus ingresos anuales. La contribución anual en el presupuesto trienal se basa en el ingreso de la diócesis dos años antes, menos $120.000.En 2013, Texas había prometido un 6,7 por ciento ($463,959 de sus $7,094,500 de ingresos); según información que puede encontrarse aquí, y que debe aprobarse este fin de semana, aparece una promesa para 2014 de $755.338.La última vez que la Convención General se reunió en una diócesis de la VII Provincia fue en 1970, lo cual es un hiato más largo que para cualquier otra provincia, agregó Barlowe.Puede encontrarse aquí más información sobre la selección.* Autorizó gastos hasta de $95.000 para peritaje profesional adicional a fin de ayudar en la revisión y el análisis de futuras acciones relacionadas con el Centro denominacional de la Iglesia Episcopal en Nueva York. La decisión se produjo después de que el Consejo se reuniera en sesión ejecutiva para escuchar un informe de un subcomité suyo que está explorando el asunto.La Resolución D016 de la Convención General, aprobada en julio de 2012, decía que “es la voluntad de esta Convención mudar las oficinas centrales del centro denominacional” de ese edificio.Hace un año, el Consejo recibió un informe que decía que “la misión reconciliadora de Dios se promueve mejor” quedándose en el 815 de la Segunda Avenida en Manhattan y consolidando las operaciones de la DFMS en el centro denominacional de la Iglesia mediante la liberación de más espacio que los 3,5 pisos que ya están alquilados, para  cederlos a inquilinos de afuera. Esta opción favorecería, según el informe, “los mejores intereses de la organización en el orden económico, tanto en lo que respecta al presupuesto como a lo fines de la inversión a largo plazo”.La Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS), la entidad corporativa de la Iglesia, alquila actualmente 2,5 pisos al Ad Council, un piso a la Misión Permanente de Haití ante las Naciones Unidas y un piso a la Escuela Internacional Liceo Kennedy [Lyceum Kennedy International School]. El centro denominacional cuenta con 9 pisos de espacio de oficinas.El estudio que hizo el informe comenzó en febrero de 2012, cinco meses antes de que se reuniera la Convención General, cuando el Comité de Finanzas para la Misión del Consejo le pidió a la gerencia de la DFMS que estudiara la posible reubicación del centro denominacional. El Grupo de Supervisión Ejecutiva [Executive Oversight Group] integrado por 10 personas, llevó a cabo el estudio.* Convino en sacar al mercado un espacio de estacionamiento en Austin, Texas, que se compró en 2009 como un sitio posible para reubicar los Archivos de la Iglesia Episcopal. Los archivos se encuentran actualmente en el campus del Seminario del Sudoeste, cerca de Austin. Los ingresos devenidos del espacio de estacionamiento han cubierto el interés del préstamo y han permitido reembolsar algo del capital. La propiedad “no es probable que sea del mayor interés financiero de la Sociedad” pero ha aumentado en valor desde la compra, según explica la resolución.El Consejo aprobó una resolución afín en que solicita que un grupo de trabajo renueve sus empeños a fin de encontrar una ubicación idónea para los Archivos.El resumen de cada resolución aprobada por el Consejo se encuentra aquí. Algunos miembros del consejo enviaron mensajes por Twitter desde la reunión valiéndose del código #ExCoun.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el  Canon I.4 (1) (a). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio].– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 10, 2014 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

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La intensidad de Absalom Jones sigue presente en Santo Tomás,…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 La congregación de la iglesia episcopal de Santo Tomás, Filadelfia, durante la procesión del Domingo de Ramos en marzo de 2013.[Episcopal News Service] El 13 de febrero puede ser el día en que el calendario de la Iglesia reconoce oficialmente la vida y ministerio del Rdo. Absalom Jones, pero para Mary Sewell Smith y otras personas en la iglesia episcopal africana de Santo Tomás [African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas], en Filadelfia, cada día es el día del fundador.Jones —el primer sacerdote negro de la Iglesia Episcopal y de la nación— fundó Santo Tomás en 1792 como la primera iglesia negra de cualquier denominación en el país, y “ese espíritu que caló en aquella primera iglesia se ha transmitido a través de los años y se mantiene vivo y pujante”, dijo Smith.“Una fuerza orientadora en nuestra iglesia es la vida y legado del Rdo. Jones. Es simplemente parte de mi vida”, dijo Smith, feligrés de toda la vida y miembro actual de la sociedad histórica de la iglesia. “Intentamos vivir a la altura de los principios que él abrazó: libertad, educación, adoración, servicio comunitario”.Además de Santo Tomás, quedan hoy unas 90 iglesias episcopales históricamente afroamericanas, congregaciones creadas por negros que no eran bienvenidos en las iglesias episcopales establecidas en la época posterior a la esclavitud y durante la segregación racial en Estados Unidos, según el Rdo. Harold T. Lewis, ex funcionario para el ministerio de los negros del centro denominacional de la Iglesia Episcopal en Nueva York y autor de Yet With a Steady Beat: the African American Struggle for Recognition in the Episcopal Church [La lucha de los afroamericanos por el reconocimiento en la Iglesia Episcopal] (Trinity Press International, 1996).Santo Tomás, la más antigua de todas estas congregaciones, surgió de la Sociedad de Africanos Libres, una organización independiente de ayuda mutua creada por Absalom Jones y Richard Allen para responder a las necesidades económicas, educacionales, sociales y espirituales de la comunidad afroamericana. Esos empeños se mantuvieron en la iglesia.“La mayoría de las congregaciones negras siempre han estado  a favor de la superación y la acción social, así como la labor con la comunidad y la preparación de la misma”, afirmó Lewis.“Lo que resulta triste es que muchas personas en la Iglesia, negras y blancas, desconocen esa historia y no saben cuántas personas han luchado para hacernos llegar adonde nos encontramos hoy”, añadió, citando el desigual pasado de la Iglesia Episcopal con respecto a los afroamericanos y el racismo.Imbuidos del espíritu de Absalom Jones
Uno de los primeros recuerdos de Smith es el de ver el icónico retrato de Jones pintado por Raphaelle Peale en 1810 que colgaba en el nártex de la iglesia mientras su padre le contaba la historia del fundador de Santo Tomás, que nació en la esclavitud, aprendió por sí solo a leer y compró su libertad en 1784. Seis años antes, él había comprado la libertad de Mary, su esposa.Jones sirvió como ministro laico hasta que a él y a otros negros les pidieron que se fueran de la iglesia metodista episcopal de San Jorge [St. George’s] en Filadelfia. Ese éxodo llevó a Richard Allen y a Jones a crear la Sociedad de Africanos Libres y dio lugar a que Allen fundara la Iglesia Metodista Episcopal Africana y a la ordenación de Jones como diácono de la Iglesia Episcopal y, nueve años más tarde, como presbítero, cuando tenía 58 años.Pero William White, a la sazón obispo de Pensilvania, convendría en ordenar a Jones y recibir a la iglesia de Santo Tomás en la diócesis con la condición de que la iglesia no enviaría ni clérigos ni diputados a la convención diocesana, privando así a los negros de voz y voto en el gobierno de la Iglesia, lo cual “caracterizaba la dualidad de las relaciones raciales dentro de la Iglesia durante gran parte de su historia”, según los documentos históricos de la iglesia.Smith recuerda las visitas a la tumba de Jones, situada “en el mismo cementerio donde están las tumbas de nuestra familia. Y cuando íbamos a visitar a nuestra familia, siempre decíamos una oración junto a la lápida de Jones”. Los restos de Jones fueron luego exhumados e incinerados y colocados en una urna en una capilla conmemorativa dentro de la iglesia de estilo gótico, explicó ella.Smith creció jugando en las gradas de la iglesia, junto con las amigas de su niñez Mercedes Sadler y las hermanas Lucille e Isabel Hamill. Las mujeres que ya están entre los setentitantos y ochentitantos años siguen compartiendo el amor a la iglesia y a la historia como miembros de la sociedad histórica. Dicen que la iglesia les inculcó un sentido de pertenencia. La historia de la iglesia era su propia historia, y también la historia de la nación.La historia vive: ‘en gran medida como parte de la iglesia’
Una de las mayores alegrías para las hermanas y maestras jubiladas, Isabel y Lucille Hamill, de 87 y 83 años respectivamente, fue encontrar una mención de su tía, Bertha Jones, entre los nombres de las mujeres de la iglesia que apoyaron varios empeños bélicos.“Había notas sobre las mujeres que ayudaron envolver vendajes para la guerra Hispano-Americana”, dijo Lucille Hamill. “Y las mujeres atendían cantinas durante las dos guerras mundiales, donde los jóvenes podían venir y comer y ser tratados maternalmente por las mujeres mayores de la iglesia, y se acostumbraron a venir”.Para las Hamills resulta difícil encontrar palabras para todo lo que la iglesia ha significado para ellas. “Te hacía sentir incluido, en una ciudad donde aún existía una segregación feroz cuando éramos jóvenes”, dijo Lucille Hamill. “Te hacía sentir parte de algo más grande que tú misma, y eso era importante”.Para preservar la historia de la congregación, la iglesia ha creado un archivo en un edificio anexo, pero se encontró con problemas de clima y humedad que están en vías de resolverse, dijo Smith. Los archivos de la iglesia ofrecen una ventana a un pasado lleno de activismo social y de trabajo comunitario y un atisbo incluso de posibilidades futuras.“Creo que, por saber un poquito de lo que ha sido la iglesia a través de los años, ella nos guía y nos llena el presente”, agregó Smith.En los archivos se encuentran los registros bautismales de Jones de fines del siglo XVIII, así como partidas de nacimientos y defunciones, sermones y discursos, listas de miembros y actas de las reuniones de la junta parroquial.Algunos documentos, en proceso de ser restaurados, anteceden a la iglesia. “En efecto, tenemos un libro de la contabilidad de la Sociedad Africana Libre”, apuntó Smith. “En todo lo que yo había leído decía que ningún registro de esta organización había sobrevivido, pero revisando nuestros viejos registros, encontramos este volumen, de 1790 a 1792, cuando la sociedad se disolvió y se convirtió en la iglesia.“Cada miembro tenía una página, y muestra que pagaban un par de chelines, y este dinero se usaba para servir a los pobres y a los discapacitados. Uno puede ver cómo las personas pagaban sus cuotas y cómo se saltaban un par de meses y luego se ponían al día”.Mirando retrospectivamente, el punto focal “siempre estaba en el servicio a la comunidad”, subrayó ella. “La Asociación de Santa María [St. Mary’s Guild] en el siglo XIX hizo ropa para los niños que no podían costearla para asistir a la escuela. Los Hijos de Santo Tomas [Sons of St. Thomas] tenemos las actas de estas organizaciones —hechas al estilo de la Sociedad Africana Libre y que funcionaron de manera muy semejante”.La Sociedad Dorcas [Dorcas Society] estaba compuesta por mujeres “y su función fundamental parece haber sido ocuparse de pagar por los entierros de mujeres de la iglesia o la comunidad”, señaló.Las listas de miembros de la iglesia se pueden leer como un registro biográfico de personajes de la sociedad afroamericana, dijo Mercedes Sadler, de 77 años, episcopal de sexta generación y miembro del coro del presbiterio, uno de los cinco coros de la iglesia.[Estas listas] incluyen a James Forten, nacido en1766 de padres negros libres, que combatió en la guerra de Independencia y aprovechó un aprendizaje en una compañía fabricante de velas de barcos para convertirla en una empresa próspera. Él empleó la mitad de su riqueza en comprar la libertad de esclavos, ayudar a financiar el periódico abolicionista The Liberator, de William Lloyd Garrison, a dirigir en su casa una estación de fuga [de esclavos que escapaban del sur] y a fundar una escuela para niños negros.Octavius Valentine Catto fue “un hombre del Renacimiento y miembro de la junta parroquial en esos tiempos”, apuntó Sadler. “Lo mataron a tiros mientras intentaba conseguir que la gente saliera a votar”.Catto tenía unos 5 años cuando su familia se mudó de Filadelfia a Carolina del Sur en 1850. Además de activista social, fue también un consumado torpedero [shortstop], entrenador de béisbol y líder del Pythian Baseball Club. Republicano y partidario de Abraham Lincoln, luchó por la aprobación de la 15ª. Enmienda, que le daba a los negros el derecho al voto, pero lo mataron el 10 de octubre de 1871, día de las elecciones. Uno de sus bates de béisbol se cuenta entre los objetos memorables del archivo.El clero y los feligreses de Santo Tomás desempeñaron importantes papeles en los movimientos abolicionistas y antiesclavistas que propiciaron la fuga de esclavos en el siglo XIX, según la página web [de la iglesia]. “En los últimos 50 años, Santo Tomás ha figurado de manera prominente en el movimiento de los derechos civiles, la Asociación Nacional para el Progreso de las Personas de Color (NAACP, por su sigla en inglés), la Unión de Episcopales Negros, el Centro de Oportunidades en la Industrialización, la Acción Interreligiosa de Filadelfia y las Mujeres Episcopales”.Para Smith, los recuerdos son personales y valiosos. Ella recordaba haber visto a su hermano practicar en casa sus deberes de acólito y el arte de encender las velas. Aunque a las niñas no se les permitía servir de acólitos entonces, ella descubrió otras maneras de servir, tal como hizo su madre.“Mi madre era lo que una llamaría una madre acólita”, dijo Smith. “En esos tiempos, nunca se sabía qué acólitos se iban a presentar. De manera que si se presentaba uno que fuera bajito, ella tenía que ajustarle la sotana con alfileres. Yo solía acompañarla en la sacristía antes del oficio, ayudándoles a prepararse [a los acólitos]. En esos tiempos no había niñas acólitas, pero siempre encontraba cosas que hacer”.Mirar atrás y andar hacia adelante
Además de la participación comunitaria, Santo Tomás ha seguido comprometida “a mantener la información y el valor de la presencia negra en la Iglesia Episcopal”, según dice su página web. La iglesia presenta una exposición del Mes de la Historia Negra, ofrece visitas dirigidas y continúa preservando su tesoro de registros y desarrollando sus archivos.“Es una extraordinaria bendición que tengamos esos magníficos archivos”, dijo Smith. “De algún modo, han reconocido, a través de los años, que esos registros eran valiosos. Uno llega realmente a tener una idea de cómo era la vida, de la gente, de quiénes eran los activistas y los líderes. Me han conectado y ha expandido mi conocimiento de la historia negra, así como mi conexión con la comunidad negra de un modo que yo no tenía”.Aunque la iglesia se ha mudado cuatro veces desde que Absalom Jones la fundó, sigue creciendo y recibiendo a otros “con algo para todo el mundo”, dice Sadler. Sus miembros representan todo el espectro de la diáspora africana así como “un buen número” de blancos.En 2000, se instalaron vidrieras emplomadas en la iglesia para rendir homenaje no sólo a Jones, sino también a varios gigantes negros de la fe: el arzobispo Desmond Tuto; Barbara Harris, obispa sufragánea jubilada de Massachusetts, la primera obispa electa en la Iglesia Episcopal; y el obispo sufragáneo Franklin Turner, que legó su báculo a los archivos.Turner, que se jubiló en 2000, falleció el 31 de diciembre de 2013, y en su memoria se celebró un réquiem el 11 de enero.En un oficio en 1992 en Santo Tomás para volver a sepultar los restos de Absalom Jones, Franklin había dicho refiriéndose a los episcopales negros: “en verdad, hemos llegado hasta aquí por fe”.“Podemos justamente enorgullecernos de nuestra permanencia en la Iglesia Episcopal, aunque ha sido una lucha cuesta arriba”, afirmó.Animar, facultar, acogerEn el espíritu del empeño de Absalom Jones en pro de la educación, la iglesia está en el proceso de lanzar un programa extraescolar, dijo el Rdo. Angelo Wildgoose, rector adjunto.“El programa extraescolar está orientado hacia las escuelas de nuestra zona y se propone básicamente ayudar con las tareas escolares, la tecnología, las ciencias de la computación y con consejos para el examen de admisión [SAT]; y la iglesia participa en toda una variedad de campañas comunitarias”, le dijo él a ENS.Entre otros programas de la iglesia, los cinco coros ofrecen una amplia gama de obras musicales: clásicas, espirituales, góspel y jazz.El 16 de febrero comienza una nueva clase de escuela intermedia y superior, Souldiers for Christ [“Almas Marciales por Cristo”], dijo Wildgoose, que presta servicios en la iglesia desde diciembre. Otro programa, destinado a conectar a los estudiantes con iglesias episcopales de la localidad durante sus años universitarios, recomenzó en diciembre con unos 15 estudiantes, dijo él.“La idea es brindarles ese hogar lejos del hogar donde podrán seguir asistiendo al culto en una iglesia episcopal y, al mismo tiempo, contar con algunos entornos familiares”, afirmó. “Tratamos de cerciorarnos de que mantenemos a nuestros jóvenes comprometidos, desde los niños hasta los que asisten a la universidad. Hacemos mucho énfasis en la participación de los padres”.La asistencia promedio del domingo es de unas 400 personas en un oficio, con unos 50 niños en la escuela dominical. “Hay algo para todos aquí”, dijo Sadler.Para Smith, sus amigos de toda la vida y muchos otros, Santo Tomás ha sido un hogar espiritual y real, “un asidero, en torno al cual organizar de algún modo la vida, y con personas de intereses semejantes”, afirmó Smith. “Somos dichosos de que nuestra congregación es multigeneracional, con una magnífica clase religiosa, un estupendo grupo de adolescentes y todos los Souldiers for Christ  y que cada grupo de distinta edad puede sentir que la iglesia les pertenece y llegar a ser una parte activa en la vida de la iglesia.“En verdad se ha incorporado a mi vida, y creo que es lo que encuentran las personas cuando vienen aquí, y es por eso que cada domingo tenemos personas que se suman a la iglesia”.– La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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Royal couple to visit Sydney’s Anglican cathedral for Easter

first_imgRoyal couple to visit Sydney’s Anglican cathedral for Easter Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Anglican Communion Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY [Sydney Anglicans] The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will visit St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney in April, as part of their Australian tour.The royal couple, along with Prince George, will fly to Australia via New Zealand, landing on April 16th.Buckingham Palace has now released the itinerary showing Prince William and the Duchess will attend the Easter Day service at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney and sign the First Fleet Bible.Archbishop of Sydney Glenn Davies, who will preach at the service, said he will be “delighted to welcome the royal couple to the celebration of Easter at the Cathedral church of St. Andrew.”The couple will also visit Brisbane, Uluru and Canberra.On Anzac Day, Prince William will lay a wreath during a Commemorative Service at the Australian War Memorial and plant a Lone Pine tree, the seed of which came from Gallipoli in the Memorial Garden. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Russell PowellPosted Mar 3, 2014 Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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Church of Pakistan remembers its martyrs

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Church of Pakistan remembers its martyrs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Gavin DrakePosted Oct 18, 2016 center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Asia Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of Pakistan has designated Sept. 22 – the anniversary of the deadliest terror attack against the country’s Christian community – as the Day of the Christian Martyrs in Pakistan. Twin suicide bombers killed 127 people and injured more than 250 others when they attacked All Saints Church in Peshawar on Sept. 22, 2013. There have been numerous other attacks – included an attempt to attack the Warsak Christian compound in Peshawar last month. A resident was killed foiling that attack.Full article. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

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