Sporting use for abandoned Council land

first_imgPedestrian crossing falls ‘out of the sky’ in Pallaskenry NewsLocal NewsSporting use for abandoned Council landBy Alan Jacques – February 27, 2014 578 WhatsApp #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Facebook Twitter Linkedin Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday center_img Previous articleFunding needed for local piersNext articleConcerns over failure to advertise top City of Culture job Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Cllr Kevin SheahanLAND that was bought for social housing and lying idle since the recession should be given to local communities for the development of sporting amenities.Fianna Fáil county councillor Kevin Sheahan told last week’s meeting of the local authorities cultural and sporting committee that towns and villages across the county were littered with sites where social housing was once planned. But with no funds available, there’s not much likelihood of them being developed in the foreseeable future.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Many of these sites were now being used by horse-owners and he believed that this impacted negatively on local communities.“I’m sick of these batty horses myself. They are a threat to people and road users. People driving through towns and villages in County Limerick see these horses and it gives a negative reaction of the area,” he claimed.He said that unused council sites would be better served as playgrounds and sporting amenities for local communities and this should be done with the council’s full support and blessing.He suggested sporting equipment and goalposts could be loaned to residents at weekends so that empty land beside estates would serve a better purpose than its current use for “corralling” horses.“We must look at the positive side. This would afford families with horses the same opportunity for their children to play and integrate better,” said Cllr Sheahan.Phelim Macken of the Limerick Sports Partnership told council members of a similar project called ‘Camp on the Green’, which he said had been a huge success in residential estates in Limerick. TAGSCllr Kevin SheahanLimerick County CouncilMusic Limerick Print Advertisement #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch Emaillast_img read more

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Do the R-2: Tiny rafts, steep creeks, big fun

first_imgLinc Stallings running Class IV+ dueling waterfalls. See the full gallery. Photo: Jeremy Rogers“I’ve got a 50/50 success rate with that drop. About half the time, I swim,” Linc Stallings tells me after he negotiates our boat over a 10-foot waterfall into a deep pool flanked by massive boulders. We’re running the North Fork of the French Broad, a small stream that drops off the Blue Ridge Parkway in Western North Carolina. It’s a rain-dependent creek with class IV+ vertical drops, deep pools, and technical boulder gardens scattered throughout a two-mile stretch that’s popular with creek boaters. We’re running it in a small two-person raft called an R-2. Across the Southern Appalachians, a handful of boaters are beginning to take these small, 10-foot rafts down narrow, class IV-V creeks that have previously only been run in kayaks and the occasional canoe. It’s a niche sport that even some creek boaters think is a little crazy.“People freak out when they see rubber coming down a creek,” Stallings says. “There are only a few people who would take a raft down these narrow rivers, so people still think it’s wild.”Of those few R-2 boaters, Linc Stallings is easily one of the most experienced. The 36 year old has been guiding rafts down class V rivers for 15 years, working the biggest rivers in the South and Colorado depending on the year. He’s a rare breed: a professional raft guide, someone who’s committed to this as a career, not just something to do between college and “the real world.”“I always thought I’d do it and move on. But I just kept doing it,” Stallings says. “I love it. I love taking people out on the river. I love hanging out with other boaters. I love the water.”R-2 creeking is essentially what raft guides do on their day off. They borrow a small two-person raft from their bosses and push it, scrape it, and paddle like hell through tight rain-dependent creeks in the mountains. The North Fork of the French Broad is one of Stallings’ favorites. He first learned to creek boat here while attending Brevard College’s wilderness immersion program. He knows the nuances of every significant rapid the way a tween girl knows the lyrics to a Justin Bieber song.“A ton of people have run this creek in a kayak,” he tells me as we begin to paddle toward the first class III rapid, just 50 yards from the put-in. “But running it in a raft has a completely different dynamic. Running tight drops in this big boat is fun, but there are some logistical things you have to work out. It’s like doing a math problem.” 1 2last_img read more

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GoPro’s CEO Dropped by $229 Million to Fulfill a Promise to…

first_imgGoPro founder and CEO Nick Woodman has honored a promise he made to his college roommate a decade ago and it cost him $229 million. Woodman had promised to give his college roommate Neil Dana 10 percent of all the money he makes when taking his company public. In 2011, GoPro issued Dana 6.3 million stock options. Woodman agreed to reimburse the company whenever the options were exercised.Neil Dana, who attended the University of California at San Diego with Woodman, was GoPro’s first employee. He currently serves as the company’s director of music and specialty sales.Woodman, whose net worth will fall to $2.3 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, was awarded $285.3 million in 2014 compensation, making him the highest-paid U.S. executive.GoPro CEO Nick Woodman.last_img read more

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