Non-traditional classrooms to continue to be used next semester as distancing requirements persist

first_imgFacebook Amanda Vasquez Twitter Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Linkedin Hermès and scarves: A look at one of the most unique combinations in the west World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution ReddIt A non-traditional classroom set up in the Brown-Lupton University Union Ballroom. (Amanda Vasquez/TCU 360) Twitter Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/center_img Boschini responds to faculty criticism over recent interview + posts What we’re reading: Request to sequester denied in Chauvin trial, Michigan’s COVID-19 cases rise Facebook Linkedin printCOVID-19 has prompted TCU to reconsider what makes a classroom. With social distancing guidelines limiting the numbers of students who can be in a room, large spaces in buildings such as the Brown-Lupton University Union and the Dee J. Kelly Alumni & Visitors Center have become classrooms. “These spaces have been mapped for physical distancing and equipped with the furniture and technology that you would expect in a traditional classroom,” said Dr. Sandra R. Callaghan, an associate professor of accounting.On April 1, Vice Provost Susan Weeks announced TCU will hold some in-person classes in non-traditional classroom settings next fall.Read more: Changes in COVID-19 guidelines, upcoming Board of Trustees meeting discussed with Faculty SenateAs of right now, the CDC has changed social distancing guidelines from six feet of social distancing to three feet. TCU will continue to monitor these changes and adjust classroom capacities as needed. Here are the current guidelines:95% capacity – six feet physical distancing 98% capacity – three feet physical distancing100% capacity – no physical distancingOnce the recommendation is made, TCU will adjust accordingly.“In the fall, we will add additional non-traditional spaces to increase the number of classroom seats available for as long as physical distancing remains part of our COVID protocol,” said Callaghan.Non-traditional classroom set up in the Dee J. Kelly Alumni & Visitors Center (Amanda Vasquez/ TCU 360)Elaine Wagstaff, clinical educator in the speech-language pathology department, has enjoyed teaching in the Kelly Center this semester.“This semester has been easy because of Cheryl Cobb and her student workers making sure we have the technology support we need,” said Wagstaff. “They have made us feel welcome and gone above and beyond to make sure we are set up for our class.”The only difficulty Wagstaff has encountered this semester has been teaching some of her students over Zoom and some online components.“That has been the biggest challenge for me this semester, adjusting to teaching more than one audience at the same time,” said Wagstaff. “The challenge for me has been the ‘new’ classroom with the Zoom component and modifying my assignments and tests to all online [and] D2L.”She also felt the new setup accommodated her class and followed social distancing sufficiently. The only difficulty, the technology, was quickly tended to by the technical support team.“They brought desks (more like small dining room tables) for each student so they are spaced out and room to spread out in their own space,” said Wagstaff. “The Kelly Center is set up for presentations so the technology was just new to me. But again Cheryl and her student assistant Sam have been so helpful.”TCU vaccinationsVolunteers at the TCU vaccination site (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)As of April 13, 8,079 students, faculty and staff members have requested the vaccine and 4,471 have been vaccinated.  TCU’s Connected Campus has been tracking the reservations and vaccinated TCU community members.Chancellor Victor Boschini announced TCU currently has no plans to require students to be vaccinated next fall, but will keep track of other universities to see what their plans are for next year. What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines Previous articleTCU Theatre looks forward to second-weekend performances of Children of EdenNext articleWhat we’re reading: Biden to pull troops out of Afghanistan, Chauvin chooses not to testify Amanda Vasquez RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Coaching Aaron Rodgers

first_imgAs a life-long Green Bay Packers fan, the past few years have brought some of the most exciting and nerve-wracking Sundays into my home. This season they started with a record of 6-0, yet they lost the next 2 games. (Note: I’ve been reminded that I don’t actually play football, so I can’t say “we” won and “we” lost.) After the week 8 loss to the Carolina Panthers, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers was quoted as saying, “I’m most disappointed about that last play. The whole thing is disappointing.” As one of the best in the league, it’s difficult to hear him be so hard on himself. Whether it’s Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady or Peyton Manning, how do you coach these elite athletes? Do they need a coach? As we say in Wisconsin, “you betcha”! And so do the elite professionals in your organization.Even the most elite athletes need a coachCredit union managers around the country speak confidently about their high performers – feeling as if they know what they’re doing and can handle any member situation. Those same managers share that they spend an inordinate amount of time with their “problem” employees, leaving little time to work with their top performers. Yet it’s more common than we care to admit to hear of those same top performers leaving not only our credit unions, but potentially the credit union movement in search of a better opportunity elsewhere.The risk of not coaching our elite performers is that they either feel as if they’re being taken for granted or that they’re not being supported when they hit a bump. We need to take the time to help them get to the next level in their career within our credit union. I recently spoke with a high performer who left her credit union after three very successful years. She shared that when she gave her notice, both her manager and the CEO seemed shocked. They told her that her name had been mentioned in several succession planning discussions. Sadly, they never shared that information with this employee and she left with a bit of a bitter taste in her mouth.Keeping Aaron happyOne of the unique characteristics of many of our elite performers is their ability to self-assess. Just like Aaron Rodgers, they know when they’re in the flow, and they know when they screw up. In fact, top performers can be more critical of themselves than you would ever be. Rather than celebrating the successes of the week, they can get wrapped up in analyzing each word that didn’t bring them the desired outcome. You can be most helpful by identifying opportunities for improvement together. Find out when they’ve got their next conversation scheduled with a member, when they’re doing their next presentation, or whatever situation they might find themselves in where they can hone their craft. To help them maintain a positive perspective, ask them what 1 or 2 goals they want to work on during their next call. To follow up, use a simple debrief process and ask:What went well in that interaction?What one thing would you like to do differently the next time?By when would you like to implement the change?Using this simple format will get your top performers to self-assess, identify an opportunity for improvement without obsessing and set a timeframe for the next time they’ll have a chance to refine their skills. By prioritizing these follow up conversations with your best players, they’ll start to feel that they are a priority for you, too.The player becomes the coachOne of the most rewarding experiences for a manager is when a high-performing direct report gets promoted into their first management position. It can be extremely rewarding for your elite staff to get the opportunity to share their best practices and coach other staff. Have you ever watched what Aaron Rodgers does either in the pre-season or when the Packers are leading by enough that he is taken out of the game? He grabs a headset and steps up to coach the 2nd string quarterback. He wants to see the team succeed, even when he isn’t playing. Your elite performers are the same. They truly want the credit union to succeed. They can help your whole team thrive. Just like with Aaron and the Green Bay Packers, we can make it back to the Super Bowl! 26SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Angela Prestil Angela Prestil is Director of Business Development for Credit Union National Association. Her responsibilities include ensuring the successful implementation of the Creating Member Loyalty™ sales culture development system, as well … Web: www.cuna.org Detailslast_img read more

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Martin Keown explains why Jude Bellingham rejected Manchester United for Borussia Dortmund

first_img Comment Solskjaer previews Crystal Palace v Man United, praises RashfordTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 3:15FullscreenSolskjaer previews Crystal Palace v Man United, praises Rashfordhttps://metro.co.uk/video/solskjaer-previews-crystal-palace-v-man-united-praises-rashford-2211076/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘There are lots of positives but I just like to see the best players in England, who are English. There is no doubt about that.‘I do feel we need to widen our horizons a little bit as we had many players going abroad for a time but nonetheless I do see this as a quick stop, that he goes to a foreign country and then comes back again the finished article.‘He has played 39 games this year, that is remarkable in itself, he is a strong young man, nearly six foot, he is still developing, can play in a succession of different positions and let’s see, let’s wish him well.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘I would have loved to have seen him play in the Premier League, I think Manchester United were keen to get him.‘He may have looked at the first team for Manchester United and thought ‘Where am I going to get a game? Am I better going to Dortmund?’‘I understand that too, let’s hope one day we see him back in the Premier League.‘It’s a shame Manchester United could have impressed him enough to take him there.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Fernandes sends hilarious message to Pogba after Man United victoryMORE: Rio Ferdinand names the Man Utd player who is ‘impossible’ to replace Jude Bellingham is set to join Borussia Dortmund after snubbing Manchester United (Picture: Getty)Martin Keown says he would have ‘loved’ for Jude Bellingham to join a Premier League club but reckons he snubbed Manchester United in favour of Borussia Dortmund over fears he would struggle for game-time at Old Trafford.The Red Devils were believed to be leading the race to sign 17-year-old midfielder Bellingham, who has made 42 appearances for Championship club Birmingham City this season.But Bellingham reportedly rejected Manchester United in favour of German side Dortmund, with the teenager undergoing a medical at the club on Friday morning.Arsenal legend Keown admits he is ‘disappointed’ that Bellingham will not be playing in England next season and says he reckons he snubbed United because of the fierce competition at the club.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTHe told talkSPORT: ‘There is a reputation for Dortmund to bring these young kids through on a conveyor belt, give them opportunities to play them and give them their heads.‘I just feel a bit disappointed that Jude Bellingham has had to go to Germany to do this and couldn’t find a place at one of the top clubs in England.‘I am pretty certain the other teams were clamouring for him, he seems a very level headed individual, he knew what he wanted. Advertisement Martin Keown explains why Jude Bellingham rejected Manchester United for Borussia Dortmund Metro Sport ReporterFriday 17 Jul 2020 1:13 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link585Shares Advertisementlast_img read more

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