Frost and Hit and Miss Harvest Windows in the New Harvest…

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Frost and Hit and Miss Harvest Windows in the New Harvest Forecast Leave this field empty if you’re human: Hit-and-miss-in-new-harvest-forecastThe monster winter storm in the west means what for Indiana? There are some answers in the new harvest forecast, made possible by First Farmers Bank and Trust, proud to support Indiana farmers, and by Kokomo Grain.That major winter storm in the upper Midwest and northern plains has changed the harvest landscape there, but what does it mean for Indiana? HAT Chief Meteorologist Ryan Martin says that system’s cold front is working its way to the Hoosier state.“That’s going to change just how things are happening over the next week or so,” Martin explained. “Moisture from the front is not all that impressive. It looks like as we finish out the week, you’re going to be seeing a tenth to maybe seven or eight tenths across most of Indiana, but then the bigger story is going to be the blast of cold air that comes in behind. I think we wake up to some frost on Saturday morning, and that should hit about half to maybe two-thirds of the state.”So, there is frost in the state, according to Martin, but temperatures will bounce back briefly before a second round of frost.“Through this upcoming week as we approach harvest again, temperatures are not going to be above normal as they have been, and near normal is all we can really do. We will see temperatures moderate a little bit Monday. Moisture coming through on Tuesday is minor, a few hundredths of an inch to probably half an inch is what we’re looking at in most areas. Coverage is about 70 percent of the state, and behind that we have another incursion of cold air. This one hits the entire state, so I think we’re looking at a re-do of frost across most of the state.”Martin says harvest operations have a chance to throttle up the second half of next week and into the weekend.“We’re going to keep most precipitation at bay during that window,” he said. “Our next big round of well-organized precipitation may wait until we get closer into the 19th and 20th. A frontal boundary coming in from the west could bring in a quarter to ¾ of an inch of rain to about 80 percent of the state.”Get Martin’s full Indiana Harvest Weather Forecast delivered to your inbox on Saturday mornings by signing up to receive the Hoosier Ag Today daily e-newsletter. You’ll also receive news updates throughout the week and Martin’s daily forecast as well.Subscribe to our free daily newsletter Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHAREcenter_img SHARE Frost and Hit and Miss Harvest Windows in the New Harvest Forecast By Andy Eubank – Oct 10, 2019 Previous articleAg Needs Momentum In China Trade TalksNext articleYoung Weighs in on USMCA and China at Fort Wayne Farmer Roundtable Andy Eubanklast_img read more

Continue reading

Whiskey and Band Aids, Or The Art of Eating Shit

first_imgYou ride your bike long enough, you’re gonna eat it sooner or later. Especially if you ride in a place like Pisgah National Forest, where the trails can be steep and stacked with off camber root gardens, mandatory boulder drops and little gnomes that jump out of the woods and push you off your bike. Sometimes, it doesn’t even take burly singletrack or mythical woodland creatures to knock you off your bike. Sometimes, you’re going 25 mph down a gravel road after surviving 20 miles of non-stop technical singletrack and combative gnomes and you do something stupid, like take a hand off the handlebars to adjust your helmet, and right then your front tire hits a babyhead in the middle of the road and your handlebars twist. And it happens fast, because you’re going 25 mph, so before you know it, you’re on the ground, elbow and shoulder first, then your face and knees. The bike lands on top of you, like a painful blanket.Ah, mountain biking.Shit happens. The only thing you can do is get back up, make sure nothing’s broken and keep pedaling. But what do you drink to ease the pain when it’s all over? When you’re back home and your picking gravel out of an open wound in your knee? That’s the real question.“Drink some whiskey and rub some dirt on it?”That’s what my buddy suggested after I picked myself up off the gravel.There’s a certain traditional logic to the suggestion. Think of all those great movies where the hero downs a shot of brown stuff and bites down on a strap of leather while his partner digs a bullet out of his shoulder.At this point, drinking a tall glass of bourbon while licking my wounds after eating shit on my bike has become a bit of a tradition for me. The way I do it doesn’t look exactly like those cliché hero/action movie scenes. I tend to whimper more than those dudes in the movies. Typically, nobody is pulling a bullet out of my body. Instead, it’s my wife hovering over me, silently recounting all of the other guys she could’ve married. Bankers and doctors who don’t come home broken and bloody. My ritual usually ends with my wife applying a Hello Kitty Band-Aid to my wound. So really, it looks nothing like those action movies. Except the whisky. That part’s the same.last_img read more

Continue reading

Soccer’s World Cup

first_imgAlthough the United States is still not considered a world power in soccer, it certainly is starting to get the attention of the world soccer community.  They probably aren’t yet ready to challenge the power countries of Brazil and Mexico, but they can certainly hold their own in most of their matches these days.The United States team is well known only to the true soccer fan, as they are not yet on the national scene like pro-football, basketball, and baseball.  Around the rest of the world, soccer easily outdraws the other pro sports each and every year.  Internationally, soccer is considered the “real” sport of the people.You can bet that as TV gets more involved with this International Soccer Tournament, people in the United States will get on board like the rest of the world.last_img read more

Continue reading

NIACC campus closing to general public

first_imgMASON CITY — The North Iowa Area Community College main campus and all NIACC centers are being closed to the general public as part of the State of Public Health Disaster Emergency declaration. A limited number of staff will continue to work on campus to maintain business and educational continuity, but the majority of the staff and faculty will begin working from home starting on Monday. Starting on Monday, all face-to-face classes, including labs and hands-on courses, will be suspended until April 13th, but those classes will be moved online as possible to allow students to complete those classes. All college buildings and locations will be closed starting Friday at 4 o’clock to everyone except those identified employees needed on-campus to perform specific in-person tasks required to maintain business and educational continuity from March 20th through April 13th. For more details on the NIACC campus closure,see below: =======FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEMarch 18, 2020NIACC Media AdvisoryNIACC CLOSING CAMPUS IN EFFORT TO PROTECT STUDENTS AND COMMUNITY FROM CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC———————————————————–In light of the State of Public Health Disaster Emergency declaration by Governor Kim Reynolds, NIACC has decided to close the main campus and all NIACC centers to the general public. A limited number of staff will continue to work on campus to maintain business and educational continuity but the majority of staff and faculty will begin working at home effective Monday, March 23.The current plan, which is subject to change, includes:Beginning Monday, March 23, all face-to-face classes, including labs and hands-on courses, will be suspended until April 13. However, to the extent possible, those classes will be moved online to allow students will be able to complete their current classes. Instructors will be reaching out to current students with more information.Classes that have moved online, will remain online until at least April 13.Continuing Education classes are suspended until April 13.All college buildings and locations will close their doors on Friday, March 20, 2020 at 4:00p.m. to everyone except for those identified employees needed on-campus to perform specific in-person tasks required to maintain business and educational continuity, and the safety of the campus from March 20 through April 13.All events, including Performing Arts events, scheduled to be held at NIACC are cancelled until further notice.The Pappajohn Center will continue to serve as a resource for local businesses, however all contacts will occur online. Updates will be posted on their website and Facebook page. Although the majority of NIACC’s faculty and staff will not be on campus, they will be available to students, prospective students, businesses, and the wide variety of people that rely on NIACC for education and services. Phone lines have been rerouted, and staff are available via the phone, email, and Zoom calls.Students will have full access to their instructors via the telephone and email, as well as through their online class software. All offices, such as advising, financial aid, and the business office will be reachable via the telephone and email.  It is important to reiterate the college is still operating and providing educational instruction via an online format and is serving NIACC students.The admissions office will be holding virtual office hours and virtual campus tours for prospective students.The health and safety of NIACC staff, faculty, students and the communities of North Iowa is an absolute priority.  As always, NIACC strives to be an important resource to the community, especially at this difficult time. NIACC will continue to send updates and remain transparent for as long as the COVID-19 outbreak affects business-as-usual in our community.We want to emphasize there are no identified cases of COVID-19 at NIACC. These measures are being put into place to protect the health and safety of our students, staff and faculty. Ongoing updates will be posted online at: www.niacc.edu/coronavirus . Questions from the public can be directed to [email protected]last_img read more

Continue reading