Why the food-to-go boom may be bad news for retail

first_imgOne in 10 shoppers have said they are spending less on food to prepare and eat at home because they are splashing out on food-to-go instead.That is one of the key findings of a new study by shopper behaviour insight specialist Shoppercentric, which said younger consumers were at the heart of the trend.Researchers found that 60% of 18- to 24-year-olds and 58% of 25- to 34-year-olds had bought food to eat on-the-go in a coffee shop or sandwich shop, compared with 31% of the 55-64 age group and 27% of the over-65s.Age was also a factor when it came to delivered food, with 44% of the 25-34 age group saying they had food delivered to their home or office in the past month by the likes of Deliveroo, Uber Eats, or Domino’s, a proportion that fell to 33% of the 35-44 age group and 25% of the 45-54 age group.Meanwhile, demand for delivered food has been growing, with a fifth of respondents (19%) saying they were having food delivered “way more” than two years ago, and a quarter (25%) “a little more” than two years ago.“Widening choice, easy accessibility, and pricing to cater for all tastes and budgets means many shoppers relying on ‘food-to-go’ believe their spending in those outlets will increase, which likely means more pressure on grocery spending,” said Shoppercentric managing director Jamie Rayner.He added that, most worryingly for grocery retailers, was the fact that Millennials (born in the 1980s and early 1990s) and Generation Z (born in mid- to late-1990s), were driving the trend.“They are the age groups who are most likely to have eaten food when out, or that was prepared away from the home. They are doing this more often and they are the ones most likely to say food-to-go is causing them to spend less on groceries.”Rayner believed food-to-go was unlikely to be a passing fad.“The fact that the food-to-go category is embracing healthier options and sustainability more quickly than grocery retailers means that no one in the grocery sector can afford to turn a blind eye to this challenge.“For the supermarkets, food-to-go is a competitor hiding in plain sight and presents a growing challenge to which they need to rise.”The Shoppercentric study followed an online survey with 1,024 shoppers who were responsible for most of the grocery shopping in their household.Delivered food is among the topics explored by baking industry experts in British Baker’s Bakery Trends Report, which can be downloaded free of charge.last_img read more

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East Central Horticulture sale announced

first_imgSt. Leon, In. — The East Central Horticulture program will be conducting their 12th annual spring plant sale on Thursday, May 3 and Friday, May 4 from 3-7:00 pm, Saturday, May 5 from 8-noon,  Thursday, May 10 and Friday, May 11 from 3-6:30 pm, and Saturday, May 12 from 9-noon.Plants available include several varieties of tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, broccoli, marigolds, misc. annuals and houseplants.  Several projects made by East Central Agricultural Science students will also be available.  All plants are started from seed by East Central Agricultural Science students.The East Central Greenhouse is located on the north side of the school.  Look for it on the second story of the building.  Please enter through the agriculture shop doors which are directly beneath the greenhouse.  For more information call 812-576-4811 x11122 or e-mail [email protected]n.us.last_img read more

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Inside Conditions…Emancipation Documentation

first_imgFILE – In this Nov. 5, 2011 file photo Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter, left, shakes hands with Nebraska wide receiver Kenny Bell after an NCAA college football game in Lincoln, Neb. Colter has become the face of a movement to give college athletes the right to form unions and bargain. After a decision this week by a regional director of the National Labor Relations board, he also could leave a legacy as the athlete who formed the foundation of a dramatic overhaul of college sports that could potentially give athletes a chance to fight for a piece of an industry that generates billions based on their performance. (AP Photo/Lincoln Journal Star, Laura Pales, File)Nobody knows the trouble I’ve seen, glory hallelujah! Now you may think that I don’t know, but I’ve had my troubles here below. One day when I was walkin’ along. The sky opened up and love come down. (From 1867 book Slave Songs of the United States)Last week a regional office of the National Labor Relations Board backed a bid by football players at Northwestern University to unionize. “I find that all grant-in-aid scholarship players for the Employer’s football team who have not exhausted their playing eligibility are ’employees’ under” the National Labor Relations Act” wrote Peter Sung Ohr, director of the board’s Chicago regional office in his ruling.Aubrey BruceAs part of the ruling Ohr also wrote that; ”walk-on players — those without scholarships — do not qualify as employees.”The ruling pointed out that; “scholarship football players at Northwestern [basically qualify as] employees: that they perform services for the benefit of their employer and receive compensation (in the form of a scholarship) in exchange and that scholarship players are “subject to the employer’s control in the performance of their duties as football players.”Ohr also differentiated the case of Northwestern’s football players from those of graduate teaching assistants at Brown University (in which the NLRB ruled for the university in 2004) because “the players’ football-related duties are unrelated to their academic studies unlike the graduate assistants whose teaching and research duties were inextricably tied to their graduate degree requirements.”“The players spend 50 to 60 hours per week on their football duties during a one-month training camp prior to the start of the academic year and an additional 40 to 50 hours per week on those duties during the three or four month football season,” the NLRB ruling said.“Not only is this more hours than many undisputed full-time employees work at their jobs, it is also many more hours than the players spend on their studies.”Wow 50 to 60 hours per week on their football duties and 40 to 50 hours per week on those duties during the three or four month football season, that is a lot of time to work for nada, zilch, nothing.Training camp 50-60 hours a week let’s take the middle road. 55 hours a week for 4 weeks of training camp; 220 hours for one month equals $2222.00 just for one month of training camp. Now 40-50 hours a week of practice, film studies and conditioning; let’s again take the middle road and say 45 hours a week during the 4 month football season, 45 hours a week time 4 weeks monthly come out to be 180 hours a month multiplied by 4 equals 720 hours times $10.10 is $7272.00 and that is the bare minimum.Players that perform in the pro football ranks have roughly the same training and practice schedule and ya know what ladies and gents? The minimum salary for rookies in 2012 was $390,000.00.  In 2013, 2012′s rookies were scheduled to earn $480,000.00 in salary as second year players in the NFL, if they make a squad as an active player.In 2014, the 2012 rookies will earn $570,000.00 in salary, if they make a squad as an active player.Hey if college players get injured they won’t even have a chance to receive the theoretical $7272.00 base salary that they should receive yearly.Remember Terrelle Pryor, the Western Pennsylvania and Ohio State standout, (now currently being paid to play for the NFL Oakland raiders)? On December 26, 2010 espn.com news services published an article titled; “Ohio State football players sanctioned.” “Welcome to Tattoo U. What started out as a trip to a Columbus tattoo parlor by a couple of football players has created all sorts of mayhem for star quarterback Terrelle Pryor and Ohio State. Pryor and four teammates were suspended by the NCAA for the first five games of [2011] season for selling championship rings, jerseys and awards. They also received improper benefits — from up to two years ago — from the tattoo parlor and its owner. Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said.“As a student-athlete, you’re not allowed to use your persona to get discounted services.” Oh, but Mr. Smith what are you allowed to receive?”It is time for the takers to become the borrowers and the low to become the high. It is time for the NCAA to be tied to the economic whipping post singing; “Nobody knows the trouble they are about to see. Will the NCAA pay the costs of future litigation from the blood, sweat and tears of scholarship players? Love is not coming down for the NCAA. The “freedom” chickens are on their way home to roost, later.(The sources for this article were insidehighereducation.com, Associated Press and espn.com news services)Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: [email protected] or 412.583.6741last_img read more

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Two Luxury Cars Stolen In One Night

first_imgThe last time a car was stolen in Rumson was on Sept. 22, from a home on Holly Tree Lane. The 2014 BMW X5 was recovered in damaged condition in New York City on Oct. 27, following an investigation by state police called Operation 17 Corridor.In 2011, three luxury cars were stolen from Rumson homes in July and August.When Rumson Police receive a car theft report, they enter it into a national crime database and notify the NJ State Police Auto Theft Task Force. Sometimes they take the extra step of contacting the Newark Police Dept. directly, Isherwood said.“There are auto theft rings based out of Newark Essex County area,” said Isher wood. “The cars can be stolen and resold on the black market,” he said. In some cases, the cars are loaded onto container ships and sent abroad, he said. RUMSON – Police are investigating reports of two vehicles stolen on the night of Wednesday, July 20.The unlocked cars were stolen out of the driveways of homes on Avenue of Two Rivers and Robin Road sometime between 9 p.m. and 5:45 a.m., according to Det. Sgt. Christopher Isherwood. The cars were identified as a 2016 Range Rover and a 2015 BMW X3. There were also reports by residents that their cars were rummaged through that night.“The common thread with these crimes is that the vehicles were not locked. It is imperative that residents keep vehicles locked and keep valuables somewhere secure,” said Isherwood.Oftentimes electronic key fobs are present in or near the vehicles, making it easy for thieves.“With this push button start in cars, it not like the old days like when you had to carry a key around. Sometimes people leave them in the car, or even on the kitchen counter,” said Isherwood. He explained that if the car is parked near the vicinity of the kitchen, for example, it could be possible to enter and easily start the car.last_img read more

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