Two bloggers banned from criticising politician accused of embezzlement

first_img April 27, 2021 Find out more November 25, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two bloggers banned from criticising politician accused of embezzlement to go further Alarm after two journalists murdered in Brazil News Two bloggers in the southwestern state of Mato Grosso, economist Adriana Vandoni and lawyer Enock Cavalcanti, were ordered by judge Pedro Sakamoto on 10 November to withdraw all comments from their blogs (www.prosaepolitica.com.br and paginadoenock.com.br) that were “offensive” to José Riva, the president of the Mato Grosso legislative assembly.The judge also told them they could be fined up to 1,000 reais (390 euros) a day if they posted any new criticism of Riva.Riva is nonetheless a politician who is worthy of comment. The head of a major financial empire and regarded as one of the most powerful people in the state, he is currently the target of more than 100 lawsuits for alleged embezzlement and 17 other actions for alleged criminal association.“This is a serious violation of free expression as the two bloggers just voiced their opinions, which is not a crime,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Preventive censorship violates the principles of the 1988 democratic constitution. We urge the federal authorities to take a position on this matter and to put a stop to such unacceptable forms of harassment by politicians, even those that support the government.”This kind of censorship above all affects cities in the interior of the country, where there are fewer and less powerful newspapers and where the Internet is one of the few public arenas where people can express their views freely, or at least try to. Court censorship is an effective method of financial pressure, as it is costly for defendants to hire a lawyer in order to appeal. Time passes and the censorship remains.This case recalls the preventive censorship to which the O Estado de São Paulo daily has been subject since 31 July, when it was forbidden to publish any reports about alleged corruption cases involving Fernando Sarney, a businessman who is the son of former President José Sarney, the current senate speaker.In a press release on 5 October, Reporters Without Borders condemned the case’s transfer to a court in Maranhão state, whose governor is Fernando Sarney’s sister. This preventive censorship measure has been in force for 118 days without anyone in the government making any comment about it. RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America Reports Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts May 13, 2021 Find out morecenter_img BrazilAmericas Organisation RSF_en Follow the news on Brazil News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies News BrazilAmericas April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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No. 21 Colorado attempts to end 3-game losing streak to Utah

first_img Tags: Colorado Buffaloes/Pac-12/Utah Utes Football December 10, 2020 /Sports News – Local No. 21 Colorado attempts to end 3-game losing streak to Utah Written by Associated Press FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailUtah is about to be unseated as Pac-12 South champions. But the Utes can have a say in the race by knocking off Colorado.The Buffaloes need to win and have UCLA beat No. 16 Southern California to claim a spot in the Pac-12 title game.Should they win, the Buffs would lose out to the Trojans on a tiebreaker scenario. Colorado’s game at USC was canceled on Nov. 28 due to virus concerns within the Trojans program.The Utes have won three straight over Colorado.last_img

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Brisbane’s prestige market on fire, starting spring with mega sale

first_imgThe home at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe, has sold at auction. This home at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe, has sold at auction for $4.6 million.IT’S been a strong start to spring for Brisbane’s prestige market, with one of the city’s most in-demand riverfront homes selling under the hammer for $4.6 million — chalking up the biggest sale in Queensland in the past week.The luxury house at 77 Macquarie Street, Teneriffe, was snapped up at auction by a local family in another sign the city’s top end is on fire despite an overall cooling in the housing sector.Set on the riverfront with spectacular views, the property is one of just 23 homes in the northeast facing Catalina development, and features four bedrooms, three bathrooms and 488 sqm of opulent living space spread over three levels.Regarded as “the” blue chip riverfront investment when it was developed 12 years ago, the Catalina homes are tightly held and hotly contested whenever they go up for sale.The view from one of the balconies of the Catalina home at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe.The home at 77 Macquarie St was marketed by Matt Lancashire and Brandon Wortley of Ray White New Farm.Mr Wortley said the property attracted four registered bidders at its auction on Saturday in front of a crowd of about 80 people.The opening bid was $4 million and quickly rose to $4.55 million before it went on the market at $4.6 million and sold to the winning bidder — a local family looking for a change from their current riverfront home.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:56Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenSpring Predictions: Nerida01:57“Bidding was pretty quick, which is a really good sign — once it kicked off it was quite frenetic,” Mr Wortley said.He admitted it was rare for top end homes in that price range to sell at auction in Brisbane.“As you go up the chain in price, it does become harder, but that part of the market has just had such a good run in the past 12 to 18 months,” he said.“Those people showing serious interest in the property weren’t people who are looking on the internet every weekend; they’re happy to wait in the shadows and then jump when something like this comes up.”The living room at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe.Macquarie Street is regarded as one of the premier streets for real estate in Brisbane, with Ray White New Farm selling about $30 million worth of property in this street alone in the past few years.Mr Wortley said an entry level house on Macquarie Street cost “well in excess of $4 million”.Recent sales include 37 Macquarie Street, which sold for $5.1 million in February this year through Hamish Bowman and Matt Lancashire, and 53 Macquarie Street, which sold for $5.236 million in March through Christine Rudolph.These are the colours you’ll be using in 2018Experts: No rate rise until late 2018Domestic violence victims facing homelessness for fleeing abusersMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor1 hour agoThe outlook from the living room at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe.On Teneriffe Hill, 48 Teneriffe Drive sold for more than $4 million, an architectural home at 78a Chester Street sold for $3.25 million through Belle Property New Farm.And artist Wendy Moore and her architect husband Jonathan Williams fetched $2.85 million for their renovated home at 95 Little Chester Street.Records show 77 Macquarie St last sold for $3.785 million in December, 2014.Tara Routledge and Jon Haseler at the Magic Millions launch party in Surfers Paradise. Photo: Inga Williams. Mr Haseler has sold his riverfront Brisbane home for $4.6 million.It was owned by the real estate developer Jon Haseler, who owns leading horse stud Glenlogan and is the managing director of QM Properties.The house is on a 365sq m block and features multiple living areas, including a television room, a library, games room and an outdoor entertainment area.This Catalina home at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe, has sold for $4.6m at auction.The home is about 2km from the Brisbane CBD and is accessed through a private security gate.It has hardwood flooring, fully-ducted, zoned airconditioning throughout and an alarm and intercom system.There is an internal store room and wine storage.Outdoor area at the home at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe.The sale of 77 Macquarie St was the biggest transaction in Queensland this week, according to property data firm CoreLogic.Another big sale this week was a contemporary four-bedroom, four-bathroom house at 179 Ninth Avenue, St Lucia.It fetched $2.2 million at auction.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:34Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenMonthly Core Index: August00:34And a five-bedroom, three-bathroom house on 817 sqm at 17 Henderson Street, Bulimba, also sold for $2.2 million through Place – Bulimba.Despite the strong results at the high end of the market, auction volumes were down in Brisbane for the first weekend of spring, with 136 auctions held.The preliminary clearance rate increased to 47.1 per cent from 43.9 per cent last week.On the Gold Coast, only 28 per cent of the 25 reported auctions were successful.The view from the Catalina home at 77 Macquarie St, Teneriffe.last_img read more

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Students advocate for Palestinian statehood

first_imgCorrection: An earlier version of this article stated that Professor Fayez Hammad spoke “…about the Middle Eastern conflict in the context of today and its conception in 1948 when the state of Israel was established.” He did not discuss these topics. In the Palestinian-Israeli dispute, 43 percent of U.S. millennials side with Israel, the lowest the figure has ever been, and 27 percent sympathize with Palestine, which is the highest share of any generation. Campus movements across the nation have gathered around the Palestinian cause. At USC, there exists a branch of the national group Students for Justice in Palestine. Last Thursday, SJP hosted “Palestine 101,” an event dedicated to informing students about the history of Palestine and the pro-Palestinian movement taking place today. The event was made “for students by students,” according to its coordinators, and around 35 students attend the lecture by Professor Fayez Hammad of the School of International Relations and department of political science. Hammad stated during the lecture that the “Arab-Israeli conflict has become a Palestinian-Israeli conflict again.”“This event is an annual thing for SJP and across campuses and across universities,” said the USC SJP President, who wished to remain anonymous to protect herself from retaliation by anti-Palestinian groups online. “Its aim is to raise awareness about the conflict from a Palestinian perspective and one which really shines light on the struggle of the Palestinian people and the geopolitical complexities that have given rise to this occupation.”According to the student organization’s president, support for the pro-Palestine movement is growing on college campuses in general, which she attributes to organizations like SJP and Jewish Voices for Peace, but at USC, the movement tends to fluctuate with student activity.“At USC, the history of SJP is not a trajectory upwards, it’s more up and down, with moments where it’s super active and moments where it’s kind of been a little more quiet but I do see this as an extremely pivotal point for USC SJP,” the president said.The president added that she approaches the movement from an academic, reading-based point of view and hopes that her colleagues do the same. She hopes to create an environment where students feel free to voice their questions.“I want to bring that to SJP, where people are not afraid to ask questions, where we’re assured of our stance, which is pro-Palestine,” the president said. “But at the same time, we can engage everyone who has doubts maybe around that and I really want to make sure that it is an inviting and open environment for that.”Yet, according to the 2015-2016 Israel on Campus Coalition Campus Trends Report, there was a 12 percent decrease in anti-Israel activity on U.S. college campuses from last year. Additionally, pro-Israel activity increased by 3.5 percent from last year.However, the SJP president also said that it is difficult to engage with the topic at USC, as it can be extremely polarizing and students are often scared to approach it.“I’m not exactly hoping to bridge that gap because I’m not sure how to do that,” she said. “I just really hope people are able to move away from the myths and the biases involved and really understand that this is one of the ongoing struggles of our generation.”Morgan Mamon, a senior majoring in Middle East studies, who is also an active member of SJP, echoed a similar sentiment, adding it is also an understudied topic in the Middle East classes at USC due to its polarizing nature. After Mamon traveled through Palestine and Israel while studying abroad, she realized the scope of the conflict and saw her academic understanding lacking.“To me, it seems that a lot of students at USC are even less educated on the topic, which is why ‘Palestine 101’ is something I’ve been very adamant about taking place this semester,” Mamon said.Mamon added that she wanted the event to be a success because if more students at USC were informed on the topic, more discussion on campus could take place.“If just a broader population at USC can be informed on the topic we could have much more fruitful discussions in the end about a conflict that is so controversial and so polarizing,” Mamon said. “It’s disappointing to me to see the fact that people are so unwilling to talk about it.”Mamon said that because the political climate of the United States tends to lean more pro-Israel, she is glad that the pro-Palestinian movement is growing on college campuses because it’s a move towards balancing out the conversation. She added that she is hoping that this will lead to more engaging discussions on the issue when taking place from a variety of perspectives.“The thing that’s saddest about this conversation in the U.S. is how polarizing it is and how incapable we are of having a real discussion,” Mamon said. “There’s so much detail and history to this place and for us to just pick a side. That is the biggest problem to this conversation in the U.S.”SC Students for Israel co-President Rachel Quinn said in an email to the Daily Trojan that they agreed the pro-Palestinian movement is growing on college campuses. They also believe creating dialogue between the two groups is the key to bridging the gap.“Differing viewpoints are not so uncommon, but nothing will be solved by either side of the conflict being shut off to learning about the other side’s views and beliefs,” Quinn wrote. “Education is also very important in beginning to end the conflict — by creating a multi-cultural dialogue (one of the main things we promote through SCSI), we can become more open to opposing views and work together for a solution we both want.”SCSI’s other co-President Shayna Lewis wrote that along with engaging in meaningful dialogue, the purpose of SCSI is to bring awareness and appreciation of the Israeli culture. This week Hillel, a Jewish organization on campus, is sponsoring “Israel Week” on campus, a weeklong event promoting Birthright, which is a cost-free, 10-day trip to Israel offered to all Jewish young adults, according to their website.“We want to expose students to Israeli culture, through various speakers, workshops and educational seminars,” Lewis wrote. “We partner with other organizations on a regular basis that offer us resources and help us promote dialogue on campus.”Lewis added that she also believes the conflict can be very polarizing for this generation, writing that often it forces people to take a side even though many of them may not have had any first-hand experience with the situation in the Middle East.“However, being associated with either side of the conflict creates the necessity to present an opinion, no matter what that opinion may be,” Lewis wrote. “This association may come from an individual identification with one side or another, but it can also result from societal expectations of where a person seems to fit into the wide range of personnel associated with the conflict.”last_img read more

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‘Can you bottle what you never had?’ Spurs fans on ‘bitter’ Gooners

first_img Whatever the outcome this season, Tottenham fans have loved it and could only laugh at the ‘bitter’ Arsenal fans Arsenal fans were revelling in Tottenham’s disappointment as their rivals saw hopes of catching Leicester at the top fade after a 1-1 draw with West Brom.With the Gunners reduced to spectators having slipped out of the title race weeks ago, there were accusations of bitterness from the white half of north London. POCHETTINO: ‘WE NEED TO BELIEVE AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS’Spurs have not been top once this season, while Leicester have never looked like surrendering their position, but Arsenal supporters, who enjoyed a spell at the summit, still enjoyed it.VARDY HANDED FURTHER ONE-GAME BAN 1last_img

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