Stressed social worker wins £140,000 compensation

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Stressed social worker wins £140,000 compensationOn 1 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today A council’s failure to listen forced a residential social worker to retirefrom stress-relates illnessA former residential social worker with Worcestershire County Council whowas forced to retire after developing a stress-related illness through work haswon £140,000 compensation. Thelma Conway had worked for the council for 20 years and was backed in herlegal action by Unison. Conway began work as a residential social worker at a home for people withlearning difficulties in Redditch in July 1994 and subsequently blew thewhistle on bad management practices. Her manager resigned after aninvestigation, after which there was an 18-month period with various actingmanagers in charge. In September 1996, Conway was put in sole charge of the home but received noadditional training and was working up to 80 hours a week. This led her tobecome depressed. Social services inspectors recommended the home needed a permanentexperienced manager, but the council failed to act. Conway took 45 days off sick in the year before finally leaving for goodbecause of ill-health in February 1998 and retiring in December 1999. The council admitted liability and her settlement was based on the injuryshe suffered, claims for loss of earnings, loss of pension, medical treatmentand retraining costs. Hugh Robertson, head of health and safety at Unison, said the Conway casehighlighted the need for employers to stop thinking of OH departments as aperipheral part of their organisation. Appropriate OH intervention could havenipped the case in the bud, he argued. “An OH department needs to be linked to the ability to intervene in theemployers’ working practices.” Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Bedfordshire golfer leads East qualifiers for Grand Medal Final

first_img Bedfordshire teenager Sophie Mills shot an impressive net score of three-under par to lead the East region qualifiers for England Golf’s 2012 Grand Medal Final. The 14-year-old from Wyboston Lakes scored net 71 and was three shots clear of the field at the East region medal final at John O’Gaunt Golf Club in Bedfordshire. The event was contested by the best women club medal players from six Eastern counties and the top 10 qualified for the Grand Medal Final to be held at Worcestershire Golf Club on Saturday, June 23.   The 10, who will join qualifiers from five other regions to compete for the title of England’s champion medal player, are: Sophie Mills (Wyboston Lakes), Sarah Howe (Ipswich), Jean Jolley (Rushcliffe), Chelsea-Mae Laundon (Chelmsford), Amy Crowson (Aylesbury Vale), Dawn French (John O’Gaunt), Anna Fairs (Fynn Valley), Leah Plester (Theydon Bois), Tina Tuckwell (Cretingham) and Julie Richards (Letchworth). All the regional finalists returned the best four scores at their club in the English Women’s  Medals during 2011. This will be Sophie’s second trip to the Grand Medal Final where she tied second last year, taking third place on countback. At that time she was playing off 11 handicap and has since reduced to eight – and another hefty cut is on its way after her performance at John O’Gaunt. “I’m really excited about going back,” said Sophie. “And Dad’s excited too!” Her father, Stuart, is a former professional and caddies for her. He also got her interested in the game, which she has been playing seriously for just two years. Sophie played steady golf in yesterday’s regional final, starting with seven straight pars. She had a birdie on the 17th and approached the last hole having dropped only three shots all day – only to take a double bogey. “I was disappointed, but it was still ok – and I did hole some good putts out there as well,” she said. Net qualifying scores Par 74, CSS 77, handicaps in brackets 71 Sophie Mills (Wyboston Lakes, 8) 74 Sarah Howe (Ipswich, 3), Jean Jolley (Rushcliffe, 19), Chelsea-Mae Laundon (Chelmsford, 12), Amy Crowson (Aylesbury Vale, 12), Dawn French (John O’Gaunt, 7), Anna Fairs (Fynn Valley, 19) 76 Leah Plester (Theydon Bois, 19) 77 Tina Tuckwell (Cretingham, 17), Julie Richards (Letchworth, 24). 13 Apr 2012 Bedfordshire golfer leads East qualifiers for Grand Medal Final last_img read more

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Tommy’s Plan for Expansion, Outdoor Games Is Challenged

first_imgBy Liz SheehanSEA BRIGHT-Who knew that bocce and cornhole could generate so much controversy?Residents of the Nautilus Condominiums in the borough did, and are continuing to fight the plans of Tommy Bonfiglio, the owner of the popular Tommy’s Tavern + Tap on Ocean Avenue, to place a bocce court and several cornhole tossing games in an area that borders the Shrewsbury River behind the restaurant, adjacent to their home.The bocce court was put in play when the restaurant opened in the summer of 2015. But after noise complaints, the bocce balls were stored away last summer. Outdoor noise is new to the neighborhood, since the building that houses Tommy’s used to serve as the town’s post office until it was wrecked in Super Storm Sandy.Now, Bonfiglio wants to resume the games. It’s part of his application before the Unified Planning Board to utilize a portion of the restaurant’s second floor for private parties, and add a 29-space parking lot next to his restaurant. (Before Sandy, it was a Sunoco gas station.)The area where the bocce court is located, Bonfiglio said, is fenced in with gates and would be closed at 10 p.m. The idea is to give patrons waiting for tables something to do, instead of crowding the hostess desk and bar in the front.At the board meeting on Tuesday night, Bonfiglio said that no food or drinks would be served in the fenced area but patrons could carry drinks there from the bar, and there would be several high top tables in the area for standing, not sitting.He estimated that 79 people could be accommodated in the area, but board member David DeSio said he observed around 100 people there, when the area was open.Dennis McLynn, who owns a condominium at the Nautilus, said he had spoken to Bonfiglio two years ago and asked him why he had put the bocce court at the north end of the open area in back of the restaurant, right next to the property line adjacent to the Nautilus, rather than at the south end, which would be a longer distance from the condominium and cause less noise for the residents there. He said Bonfiglio responded that the south end was reserved for a future tiki bar.McLynn said he fears that next year Bonfiglio will be looking for board approval to add a tiki bar to the riverside site.Stephen Raciti, the architect for the Tommy’s project, outlined the changes he had made to alleviate the noise from the restaurant, including soundproofing on a canopy on the rear outside dining area that faces toward the Nautilus, and soundproofing in a portion of the roof of the canopy.Ron Gasiorowski, an attorney representing Hank Gelhaus, who lives across the river from Tommy’s and objects to the noise, questioned Marc Leber, the engineer for Bonfiglio’s application. He asked if he was aware that Bonfiglio attended a meeting held by Monmouth County officials in April, at which the plans for moving the Rumson-Sea Bright Bridge were discussed. Leber said he was not aware of it.At the meetings concerning the moving of the bridge, the county has said that the parking lot now being used to fulfill the parking requirements for Tommy’s application to make the upstairs room into a space for private parties was necessary for bridge plans to accommodate left hand turns from Ocean Avenue, for access to the Dunkin’ Donuts area.Bonfiglio’s attorney Martin McGann said after the last board meeting that the county had told him it would not stop his client with proceeding with his plans to use the lot for the restaurant’s parking application. “It’s our property,” he said.The board will continue hearings on the application on January 24.last_img read more

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