A new vision for Houghton Library

first_imgAn upcoming renovation to Houghton Library will modernize its research and teaching facilities, expand its exhibition galleries, improve physical access to its spaces and holdings, and create a more welcoming, inviting, and accessible environment.The renovation represents a key component of a larger vision for the rare books library, which celebrated its 75th anniversary last year. It serves as a research center and teaching laboratory for students and faculty across many disciplines that use primary sources, hosting nearly 300 class visits each year and programming a series of exhibitions and events that draw a range of visitors from across Harvard and surrounding communities. To expand its reach vastly, the library’s digitization efforts have placed its collections within reach of researchers around the world.“We want all of Houghton Library — the collections, the building, and our expert staff — to generate interest in and passion for the humanities, the arts, the social sciences, and more,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “Our efforts to create a more inclusive atmosphere and to increase access to Houghton’s collections and services will ensure the library becomes an even more active and highly valued resource for Harvard and the world at large.”The renovations were made possible through generous donations, including a major gift from philanthropist and bibliophile Peter J. Solomon ’60, M.B.A. ’63, and his wife, Susan, whose extensive collection of rare and treasured children’s literature and illustrations provided the catalyst for the renovation. The Solomon collection includes a copy of the suppressed first edition of “Alice in Wonderland,” as well as additional works by Lewis Carroll, Beatrix Potter, Edward Lear, and other authors. The Solomons’ promised donation sparked an effort to make Houghton more welcoming to the Harvard community and visitors alike.,“Peter’s gift is a testament to his profound love of books, his belief in the power of literature to change lives, and the essential role of the library in the life of the University and in society at large,” said Sarah E. Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library and University librarian and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “There are so many people his generous support will affect: students, faculty, researchers, and visitors from around the world, and of course the staff who support the critical work of the library. I know our gratitude is deep.”“We wanted our collection to be where it would join similar holdings and be enjoyed by the widest possible audience,” Solomon said. “Houghton houses extraordinary material and enjoys a prime location within the Yard, but more Harvard students should explore its treasures.“Redesigning the entrance, integrating the building more prominently into its surroundings, and creating a more dynamic set of interior spaces will encourage greater appreciation of the library,” he added.Construction will begin next September, and the building will be closed until September 2020. During renovations, the Houghton Reading Room will return to its original location, the Periodicals Reading Room in Widener Library. Classrooms in Widener Library, Pusey Library, and Lamont Library will accommodate courses that use Houghton collections for teaching.Houghton is working with Ann Beha Architects and partnering with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Office of Physical Resources and Planning on the two-year project. The renovation will include redesigning the landscape between Quincy Street and the library entrance; replacing the daunting main entrance staircases with elegant paths at a wheelchair-accessible gradual incline; and connecting a plaza to the entrance, creating more space for people to gather outside. Natural light will be introduced to the entrance lobby, which will feature a dynamic exhibition gallery displaying materials drawn from the library’s collections. A new elevator will take visitors to the teaching spaces, exhibition gallery, and special thematic rooms on the second floor. Ground-floor restrooms will be remodeled and expanded. Improvements to Houghton’s reading room will include a soundproof entry and help-desk area, and an adjacent room where library users can work with materials in collaboration with library staff.The plans have the enthusiastic support of the University, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and the Harvard Library.“Today’s libraries are much more deeply engaged in teaching and outreach, and in an era where digital information is so prevalent, connecting people with our special collections and original materials which resonate with the context of their time and form is a key goal of Harvard Library,” said Thomas. “As a member of the Harvard College Library and Harvard Library, Houghton plays an important role in opening up the magic of collections and libraries to all visitors, as well as supporting research and teaching.”last_img read more

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Scatec Solar submits $24/MWh bid for Tunisia solar project, a record low in Africa

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:Tunisia’s Ministry for Energy, Mines and Renewable Energy has received five bids for the 500 MW solar tender it launched in November.Mehdi Majoul, an advisor to the ministry, wrote on his LinkedIn social media account that the bids, submitted by unspecified leading international solar companies, all offered record low energy prices for the Tunisian market, according to the tender’s preliminary results.Majoul added, the lowest bid – DT71.800/kWh ($0.0244) – was for a 200 MW project in the province of Tataouine. Two 50 MW projects, in the provinces of Sidi Bouzid and Tozeur, attracted offers of DT79.300/kWh ($0.027), according to the advisor, and the two remaining 100 MW projects – in the provinces of Gafsa and Kairouan – prompted bids of DT79.900/kWh ($0.0272) and DT84.100/kWh ($0.0286), respectively.“Notably, the tariff tendered by the company Scatec Solar for [the] Tataouine project, namely $0.0244 per kilowatt hour, is the lowest bid ever recorded in Africa and is among the lowest in the world,” wrote Majoul. “The prices proposed under this tender will help bring down the cost of production of electricity nationwide and reduce the bill for energy subsidies in addition to lowering national imports of natural gas by 5%. These projects will start operating from 2021.”The Tunisian government had pre-qualified 16 developers for the tender. Among them were European energy giants Enel, Engie, Total and EDF – the latter in a consortium with UAE-based Masdar and Japan’s Mitsui. Other bidders included Canadian Solar; Spanish developers Acciona and Fotowatio; French concerns GreenYellow, Akuo and Voltalia; Norway’s Scatec; Saudi power company ACWA; and China’s TBEA.More: Lowest bid in Tunisia’s 500 MW solar tender comes in at $0.0244 Scatec Solar submits $24/MWh bid for Tunisia solar project, a record low in Africalast_img read more

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China Targets Christian Weddings and Funerals

first_imgBy Share America October 29, 2019 In early 2019, Chinese authorities have broken up Christian funerals and weddings in Henan province, says Bitter Winter, an online magazine that documents human rights abuses in China. Worshipers are threatened with jail and investigation. Some are arrested.The U.S. Department of State has designated China as a “Country of Particular Concern” since 1999 for severe violations of religious freedom.According to the 2018 International Religious Freedom Report from the U.S. Department of State, the Chinese government requires Christian churches to install surveillance cameras, so that the police can monitor activities daily, and compels Christians to sign documents renouncing their Christian faith. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo described China’s actions as “heinous.”Restrictions on religion growing worseChina also wants informers. The South China Morning Post reported in March 2019 that Guangzhou city officials have began offering $1,500 cash rewards for information on religious gatherings.China is among the top 10 countries with the most restrictive laws and policies toward religious freedom, a 2019 Pew Research Center report finds. In the Communist Party of China’s ongoing campaign to Sinicize religion (make it more Han Chinese), Christians, Uighur and Hui Muslims, Tibetan Buddhists, and Falun Gong are particular targets of harassment.“Religious persecution is a defining challenge of the 21st century, and the United States will proudly lead the charge to protect religious freedom wherever it is under attack,” U.S. Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom Sam Brownback said in written testimony in June.last_img read more

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Onsite: CUES Symposium 2015 Recap

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details I had the opportunity to spend the week at CUES Symposium 2015 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. I know, tough assignment for the first week of February. Some how we all manage through the 85 degrees heat and ocean breezes.CUES Symposium brought together some 220+ credit union CEOs and board chairs. This conference is different in that for the CEO to attend the must bring their board chair. Sessions and activities focus on building and improving on this key relationship and developing the roles of each in their credit union.Monday started with a welcome from CUES President/CEO, Chuck Fagan. You could see the discomfort of many CEOs and board chairs when Chuck presented the statistic that 50% of the workforce will be millennials by the year 2020. I may have even heard a “Kids these days” at my table. Chuck focused on the changing workplace and the need to modernize education in our credit unions. You can read more about how CUES is helping with this in Chuck’s latest Community article, “2020 Learning: Wherever, whenever and on the device you prefer.”Jay Baer, marketing strategist and best selling author held a rousing general session on Youtility. Jay spoke about Facebook and social media and how every single member and nonmember’s Facebook feed is a combination of personal and commercial relationships. The focus of Jay’s presentation was to get the credit unions to stop trying to be amazing and start being useful. Doing this is what he calls “Youtility,” marketing so useful that people would pay for it. Jay gave examples of companies doing it right, Hilton Hotels, Clorox and even mentioned a couple credit unions (Elevations Credit Union and Idaho Central Credit Union).The following three days had the attendees of CUES Symposium divided into three groups based on asset size of their credit union. The groups rotated by day through sessions presented by:Richard Powers a senior lecturer from the Rotman School of Management and the CUES Governance Leadership Institute. Mr. Powers facilitated the session entitled “The Tone at the Top: Strong Ethics Make Strong Credit Unions.”Sarah Robinson a business strategist, speaker and the author of Fierce Loyalty. Ms. Robinson led her session “Fierce Loyalty: Unlocking the DNA of Wildly Successful Brand Communities.”Doug Nielsen, CSP, MSW, LCSW, an author, performance interventionist, coach and psychotherapist. Mr. Nielsen’s session was titled “The Core Connected Leader: Unleashing Your Inner Power.”All three sessions were interactive and involved many discussions between the CEOs and board chairs in attendance. There may have even been an guitar and singing that happened in one group.CUES Symposium 2016 will take place next year at the Grand Wailea Resort Hotel and Spa in Maui, Hawaii (my personal favorite place on earth). So mark January 31 – February 4, 2016 off your calendar, grab your board chair and plan on being in Maui.last_img read more

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Apple Could Be Working on In-Display Infrared Fingerprint Scanner, Patent Suggests

first_imgApple has been granted a patent for an image sensor housed under the screen by the US Patent and Trademark Office. The patent that was filed in October 2018 suggests that the company could be planning to add an in-display fingerprint scanning technology in its future offerings. In the past, Apple used a physical fingerprint scanner called Touch ID and then moved to Face ID with its iPhone X series. As per the patent, the input sensor will be placed between the ‘outer protective cover’ and the ‘display stack.’The patent filed by Apple with the US Patent and Trademark Office with patent number 10,824,837 B2 back in October 2018 has now been granted. It includes plans for an “optical imaging sensor” that is “positioned at least partially behind a display and is configured to emit shortwave infrared light.”- Advertisement – Are iPhone 12 mini, HomePod mini the Perfect Apple Devices for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. – Advertisement –center_img It should be noted that patents usually indicate avenues that a company may be exploring. It’s not necessary that a patented research will always translate into mass production. Apple’s patent suggests that it plans on introducing an in-display fingerprint scanner with a device, however, it is currently unclear whether it could be for the next generation iPhone and iPad models, if at all.Apple’s patent includes a protective outer cover that will be the interface surface, a display positioned adjacent the protective outer cover, and an optical imaging system that comprises a light emitting element that produces shortwave infrared light. This is essentially how an in-display fingerprint scanner works as the light reflected back from the finger is used to construct a unique image or fingerprint. Another method of in-display fingerprint authentication is ‘ultrasonic,’ that involves sending ultrasonic pulse to detect the ridges and valleys of a fingerprint. It is present in the Samsung Galaxy S20 series of phones.In the past, Apple has steered clear of in-display fingerprint scanning. After its Touch ID system, that was last seen on iPhone SE (2020), it switched to Face ID starting with the iPhone X series. Apple has also decided to stick with Face ID for its latest iPhone 12 series, but decided to go with Touch ID for its new iPad Air.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Luxury home sells 24 hours after auction

first_imgVendors Brian and Jane Riggall before the auction. The couple are downsizing. (AAP Image/Steve Pohlner)More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours ago“They liked the fact it felt like a five-star resort in Phuket or Bali,” he said.“They have a family-owned company in PNG and children at university in Brisbane so wanted a Brisbane base.” 1. 110 Virginia Ave, Hawthorne $11.128m2. 27 Sutherland Ave, Ascot $11m3. 33 Moray St, New Farm $11.3m4. 33 Maxwell St, New Farm $8.5m5. 150 Adelaide Street East, Clayfield $7m6. 30 Windermere Rd, Hamilton $5.95m7. 17 Ningana St, Fig Tree Pocket $5.1m8. Welwyn Cres, Coorparoo $5.025m9. 127 Laurel Ave, Chelmer $5m10. 27 Sutton St, Chelmer $4.83 million 27 Sutton St at Chelmer has the full suite of luxury resort-style amenitiesA RIVERFRONT mansion at Chelmer has sold for $4.83 million – just one day after being passed in at auction.It is the second highest sales price achieved in the prestige suburb this year, with 127 Laurel Avenue selling for $5 million in February, according to CoreLogic.The sale has also landed the house in the top 10 Brisbane residential sales so far this year, with 27 Sutton St taking tenth position, knocking out 32 Teneriffe Drive at Teneriffe ($4.405mn). Mr Adcock said the buyer was drawn to the property due to its 34m absolute river frontage, tennis court, resort-style pool and studio kabana/guesthouse overlooking the river. The 27 Sutton St, Chelmer, property was inspired by the owners’ holiday memories.Jason Adcock of Adcock Prestige, who sold both Chelmer properties, said there were 10 registered bidders for the November 3 auction at 27 Sutton St, with bidding starting at $2.5 million and then stalling at $4.5 million.center_img Mr Adcock said the other main player on auction day was a buyer who had relocated from Perth to Brisbane. Overall, he said the prestige market continued to fire in Brisbane. “There is a lot of activity in the prestige market and a lot of that is being driven by interstate and overseas buyers, and expats coming back home,” he said.“There is also strong interest from locals upgrading … I have a tonne of properties coming on to the market, with auctions scheduled right up until December 22.”*** TOP 10 BRISBANE RESIDENTIAL SALES OF 2018 “The new owner saw the house for the first time on the Friday (November 2) and was the highest registered bidder on the day,” he said.“Negotiations continued after the auction and the property was sold Sunday morning.”The luxury residence was featured on the cover of the October 27 edition of Courier Mail Realestate, and the story was seen online by the new owner. ORIGINAL STORY: Inspired by holiday memories last_img read more

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