Bahamas Police  Woman stabbed teen stabbed

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, June 8, 2017 – Nassau – Police reports confirmed that around 12:30am Wednesday, a woman was found stabbed to death at her Peter Street home, off Market Street. Neighbours reportedly found the woman’s lifeless body on the floor in her home and phoned the police.  Police are now searching for a male suspect in connection with the stabbing after witnesses said he was last seen leaving her home before they discovered her dead. Police also confirm the stabbing of a student of HO Nash  junior high during a fight with another teenager.   Senior ACP Stephen Dean says they have a boy in custody and labeled the stab wounds of the other boy, as minor and done with a knife with a small blade. #MagneticMediaNews#twostabbingsinNassau Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #twostabbingsinNassaulast_img read more

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Scientists Build Nanostructures out of Single DNA Strands

first_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — With its unique double-helical structure, DNA has the ability to be used as a programmable building material to construct designer nanoscale architectures. Complex DNA architectures could have a variety of applications, from DNA-based nanomotors to biosensing and drug delivery. Taking the research a step forward, researchers have recently constructed a nanometer-sized tetrahedron from a single strand of DNA, using a method that could have advantages for assembling similar structures on a large scale. Front and top views of the 3D molecular model of the tetrahedron. Image copyright: Zhe Li, et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The researchers, from Arizona State University (ASU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), have published their results in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. As the researchers explain, the variety of different artificial DNA constructions has been increasing. So far, 3D DNA nanostructures are made from multiple DNA strands (oligonucleotides) with deliberately designed sequences. In this new study, Hao Yan of ASU, Yongli Mi of HKUST, and their colleagues have shown that DNA tetrahedrons can now be self-folded from only a single DNA strand. In addition, they demonstrated a method to replicate the DNA tetrahedrons in vivo, which could also be applied to the design and replication of other DNA nanostructures in the future.“A self-folded 3D nanocage that can be replicated in vivo tells us how powerful nature’s machineries are,” Yan and Mi told PhysOrg.com. “DNA nanostructures can serve as scaffolds to organize other material with controlled spatial arrangement. Spatial dependent biomolecular/nanomaterial interactions can thus be tuned and studied.”The DNA tetrahedrons, made of four triangular faces, were constructed from a DNA strand that was 286 nucleotides long. The tetrahedron’s six edges were composed of double helices: five were identical (double helical), while the sixth edge had a more complex “twin double-helical” structure. Four of the edges contained a cleavable site in the center, and all four vertices consisted of an unpaired thymine base to allow adequate flexibility for folding at these corners. Once the DNA strand was paired in this way, the researchers annealed the DNA in a process of heating and then cooling. When annealed, the DNA strand self-assembled into the seven-nanometer-long tetrahedron shape by combining the appropriate base pairs together. After confirming the successful assembly of the DNA tetrahedron, the researchers then developed a method to replicate the nanostructures using in vivo cloning in order to produce the nanostructures on a large scale. The researchers inserted one of the tetrahedrons into a cloning molecule called a phagemid, and then recovered several replicated tetrahedrons through a process of restriction digestion of the phagemid. This method is fully scalable, with the yield of cloned structures proportional to the size of the culture medium. As the researchers explain, using only a single DNA strand for creating nanostructures has several advantages, including simplifying the assembly process, increasing yield, offering the ability to scale up production, and creating structures with longer life spans in biological systems, such as inside living cells. This property is especially appealing for in vivo applications such as biosensing and drug delivery. In the future, the researchers hope to build on this method to synthesize nanostructures out of RNA, as well as build other complex shapes.More information: Zhe Li, Bryan Wei, Jeanette Nangreave, Chenxiang Lin, Yan Liu, Yongli Mi, and Hao Yan. “A Replicable Tetrahedral Nanostructure Self-Assembled from a Single DNA Strand.” J. Am. Chem. Soc. Doi: 10.1021/ja903768fCopyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Scientists Build Nanostructures out of Single DNA Strands (2009, September 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-09-scientists-nanostructures-dna-strands.html Using living cells as nanotechnology factorieslast_img read more

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Dingoes like wolves are smarter than pet dogs

first_imgDingo The dingo is considered a “pure” prehistoric dog, which was brought to Australia tens of thousands of years ago by the Aborigines. While they have in the past been associated with humans, they have adapted to surviving “wild” in the Australian outback. The dingo lies somewhere between the wolf, its ancient ancestor, and the domestic or pet dog, and has cognitive differences between the two. There has been little research done on dingoes, even though studies would aid in the understanding of the evolution of dogs, and it was unknown whether the dingo was more “wolf-like” or “dog-like”.Researchers in South Australia have now subjected the Australian dingo (Canis dingo) to the classic “detour task,” which has been used by previous researchers to assess the abilities of wolves (Canis lupus) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) to solve non-social, spatial problems. The detour task involves placing a treat behind a transparent or wire mesh fence. The dog can see the food but cannot get to it directly and has to find its way along the fence and through a door and then double back to get the food. Previous research has shown wolves are adept at solving the problem quickly, while domesticated dogs generally perform poorly and fail to improve significantly even after repeated trials. The wolves were also able to adapt easily when conditions were reversed, but pet dogs also generally fared poorly at this task.Until now dingoes had not been tested, so lead researcher, PhD student Mr. Bradley Smith of the School of Psychology at the University of South Australia, decided to subject 20 sanctuary-raised dingoes (Canis dingo) to the V-shaped detour task, in which a V-shaped fence is the barrier to the treat (a bowl of food) placed at the intersection point of the V, and the detour doors swung either inward or outward.The dingoes were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions previously used to test dogs and wolves. These were the inward or outward detour (with doors closed), inward detour (with doors open), and inward detour (with a human demonstrator). Each dingo was tested four times and then given a fifth trial with the conditions reversed.The results showed the dingoes completed the detour tasks successfully, and they achieved fewer errors and solved the problems more quickly (in around 20 seconds) than domestic dogs tested in previous research. Unlike domesticated dogs in previous studies, the dingoes did not look to humans for help, and only one dingo even looked at the human when solving the problem. This behavior was much more similar to findings with wolves than for pet dogs.The findings were published in the journal Animal Behaviour. All tests were carried out at the Dingo Discovery Centre in Victoria. (PhysOrg.com) — Studies in the past have shown that wolves are smarter than domesticated dogs when it comes to solving spatial problems, and now new research has shown that dingoes also solve the problems well. Citation: Dingoes, like wolves, are smarter than pet dogs (2010, June 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-dingoes-wolves-smarter-pet-dogs.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: References: — dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2010.04.017 — courses.media.mit.edu/2003spri … ciallearningdogs.pdf– dx.doi.org/10.1006/anbe.2001.1866 Study challenges popular image of dingo Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Hill tea garden labour union to stop dispatch from today over unpaid

first_imgDarjeeling: The Darjeeling Terai Dooars Plantation Labour Union (DTDPLU, affiliated to the Gorkha Janmukti Morcha) will stop the dispatch of tea from Hill tea gardens from Thursday. The Joint Forum of Tea Unions will stop the plucking of leaves in the tea gardens from March 11. The move comes in protest against the non-payment of arrears in around 60 percent tea gardens in the Hills.This is the time of the premium first flush tea, which is exported. “In January 2018, the daily wages of tea garden workers had been increased by Rs 17.50. However, in most of the gardens in the Hills, the increment took effect from March 2018. A year has passed and the arrears have still not been paid,” stated Balam Tamang, president, Darjeeling sub-division committee, DTDPLU. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseTamang stated that upon hearing about the blockade of tea dispatch, the Darjeeling Tea Association has called for a meeting of the management of the gardens that have not paid the arrears and trade union representatives on Friday. “We will stop tea dispatches from Thursday. Depending on the outcome of the meeting on March 8, we will decide on our future course of action,” stated Tamang. The Joint Forum (conglomeration of 6 unions) has launched a dharna at the Darjeeling Tea Association. “We will hold gate meetings from Thursday till March 9. If arrears are not paid by March 10, we will stop the plucking of tea leaves from March 11,” stated J B Tamang, convener of the forum. It may be mentioned that there are 87 tea gardens in the Darjeeling Hills.last_img read more

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