Ween Announces Three-Night Thanksgiving Run At The Capitol Theatre

first_imgThe Ween dates keep rolling in! The beloved group has just announced a brand new three-night run, appearing at the Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY over Thanksgiving weekend, from November 25-27. As The Cap Theatre officially re-opened four years ago, during Ween’s hiatus, this will mark the band’s first-ever performances at the storied venue.Dean Ween, however, recently performed at The Cap as part of a double billing with The Claypool Lennon Delirium. Fans will remember his epic appearance during an encore jam on “Southbound Pachyderm,” with the insane talents of Dean Ween, Sean Lennon, and Les Claypool joining forces for a remarkable psychedelic odyssey. Watch that Capitol Theatre highlight, here.Tickets for the Thanksgiving Ween run will be available by a lottery request system until this Wednesday, and tickets officially go on sale this Friday, September 16th. You can find details in the band’s Facebook post, embedded below.last_img read more

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A new vision for Houghton Library

first_imgAn upcoming renovation to Houghton Library will modernize its research and teaching facilities, expand its exhibition galleries, improve physical access to its spaces and holdings, and create a more welcoming, inviting, and accessible environment.The renovation represents a key component of a larger vision for the rare books library, which celebrated its 75th anniversary last year. It serves as a research center and teaching laboratory for students and faculty across many disciplines that use primary sources, hosting nearly 300 class visits each year and programming a series of exhibitions and events that draw a range of visitors from across Harvard and surrounding communities. To expand its reach vastly, the library’s digitization efforts have placed its collections within reach of researchers around the world.“We want all of Houghton Library — the collections, the building, and our expert staff — to generate interest in and passion for the humanities, the arts, the social sciences, and more,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “Our efforts to create a more inclusive atmosphere and to increase access to Houghton’s collections and services will ensure the library becomes an even more active and highly valued resource for Harvard and the world at large.”The renovations were made possible through generous donations, including a major gift from philanthropist and bibliophile Peter J. Solomon ’60, M.B.A. ’63, and his wife, Susan, whose extensive collection of rare and treasured children’s literature and illustrations provided the catalyst for the renovation. The Solomon collection includes a copy of the suppressed first edition of “Alice in Wonderland,” as well as additional works by Lewis Carroll, Beatrix Potter, Edward Lear, and other authors. The Solomons’ promised donation sparked an effort to make Houghton more welcoming to the Harvard community and visitors alike.,“Peter’s gift is a testament to his profound love of books, his belief in the power of literature to change lives, and the essential role of the library in the life of the University and in society at large,” said Sarah E. Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library and University librarian and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “There are so many people his generous support will affect: students, faculty, researchers, and visitors from around the world, and of course the staff who support the critical work of the library. I know our gratitude is deep.”“We wanted our collection to be where it would join similar holdings and be enjoyed by the widest possible audience,” Solomon said. “Houghton houses extraordinary material and enjoys a prime location within the Yard, but more Harvard students should explore its treasures.“Redesigning the entrance, integrating the building more prominently into its surroundings, and creating a more dynamic set of interior spaces will encourage greater appreciation of the library,” he added.Construction will begin next September, and the building will be closed until September 2020. During renovations, the Houghton Reading Room will return to its original location, the Periodicals Reading Room in Widener Library. Classrooms in Widener Library, Pusey Library, and Lamont Library will accommodate courses that use Houghton collections for teaching.Houghton is working with Ann Beha Architects and partnering with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Office of Physical Resources and Planning on the two-year project. The renovation will include redesigning the landscape between Quincy Street and the library entrance; replacing the daunting main entrance staircases with elegant paths at a wheelchair-accessible gradual incline; and connecting a plaza to the entrance, creating more space for people to gather outside. Natural light will be introduced to the entrance lobby, which will feature a dynamic exhibition gallery displaying materials drawn from the library’s collections. A new elevator will take visitors to the teaching spaces, exhibition gallery, and special thematic rooms on the second floor. Ground-floor restrooms will be remodeled and expanded. Improvements to Houghton’s reading room will include a soundproof entry and help-desk area, and an adjacent room where library users can work with materials in collaboration with library staff.The plans have the enthusiastic support of the University, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and the Harvard Library.“Today’s libraries are much more deeply engaged in teaching and outreach, and in an era where digital information is so prevalent, connecting people with our special collections and original materials which resonate with the context of their time and form is a key goal of Harvard Library,” said Thomas. “As a member of the Harvard College Library and Harvard Library, Houghton plays an important role in opening up the magic of collections and libraries to all visitors, as well as supporting research and teaching.”last_img read more

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FDA claims progress on food protection plan

first_imgJul 2, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today released a 6-month status report on its progress in implementing a food safety plan launched in November in response to high-profile contamination incidents involving domestic and imported foods over the past few years. The agency has conducted “incident command system” training courses and has developed a farm investigation course, which was held in February, for federal, state, and international investigators. FDA food protection plan 6-month summary See also: “Implementing the strategic approaches outlined in the plan is essential if we are to enhance our ability to respond and intervene in foodborne outbreaks,” said FDA Commissioner Andrew von Eschenbach, MD, in a press release today. “But there is much more that needs to be done. We are hopeful that Congress will support these efforts by providing the proposed new authorities that we requested in the Food Protection Plan.” Also, the FDA is seeking feedback on a variety of food safety proposals, including outreach activities and pet-food labeling and safety standards. Other prevention areas the FDA plans to address include modifying food safety guidelines for leafy greens and melons, updating Good Agricultural Practices, issuing a final rule on Salmonella enteritidis contamination of shell eggs, and modernizing Good Manufacturing Practices for human food. In 2007, the FDA launched a Tomato Safety Initiative to explore problems associated with Salmonella contamination in tomatoes. The agency said it has completed its review of growing areas in Virginia and central Florida and is now analyzing the information so that it can report its findings. The agency plans to hire and train at least 161 new full-time food inspectors. Also, it is seeking feedback on a plan to allow third-party certification programs to ensure that imported food meets FDA requirements. Nov 6, 2007, CIDRAP News story “US food safety plan calls for mandatory recall power” The agency said it has made progress with China and Vietnam on food and import safety issues and has also reached out to India and Jordan. It has also met with a host of other countries on rapid response and other food safety issues. Among technical accomplishments, the FDA said it has developed an assay to gauge the stability of two bioterrorism agents in high-risk foods and has published a study on the microbiological load of bagged, ready-to-eat produce. Intervention initiativesThe FDA said it has beefed up inspections at a facility that produces low-acid canned foods (LACF), because of concerns about botulism. The measure resulted in a recall after inspectors found viable Clostridium botulinum spores. In view of the findings, the agency said it is considering targeting more LACF facilities.. Also, the FDA has asked states to apply for funding to establish rapid response teams. Six states will receive cooperative agreements for this purpose in 2008, and three more will receive them in the 2009 fiscal year.center_img The 8-page report, available on the FDA’s Web site, covers a wide range of action items, from efforts to solicit stakeholder comments to research on how to assess produce contamination risks. Progress assessments are grouped under prevention, intervention, and response sections. In each category the FDA also lists steps it plans in the future. Jul 2 FDA press release Yesterday during the FDA’s update on the Salmonella outbreak investigation, David Acheson, MD, associate commissioner for foods, said many producers and distributors still use paper records, which have slowed the trace-back investigation. He told reporters that electronic records would enhance traceability. Some lawmakers have charged that the FDA has been too slow in implementing the food safety plan. For their part, FDA officials have said Congress has failed to grant the FDA authorities it has requested in the plan, such as the ability to require food recalls. Based on President Bush’s proposed 2009 budget, the FDA said it would conduct 327 more state contract food inspections than were completed this year and that its regulatory affairs office will conduct an additional 20,000 food import field exams. The status report comes as the FDA is fielding criticism over its handling of the investigation of a massive Salmonella outbreak thought to be linked to fresh tomatoes or some other ingredient commonly served in combination with tomatoes. When the FDA released its food protection plan in November, it emphasized that the strategy reflects a risk-based approach to improving safety. The new report says the FDA has established a risk-based steering committee to ensure that the plan adheres to that approach. Ramping up response capacityAcknowledging that better trace-back capabilities are needed to speed responses to foodborne illness outbreaks, the FDA said it has initiated discussions with industry and other stakeholders on current traceability models and how to identify beset practices for the process. “There have been changes in both the food industry and in the science of food safety that indicate a need for modernization,” the report says. Prevention plans move forwardThe FDA said it is working with state and local partners to develop a strategy for implementing the food safety plan and that a 50-state meeting will be held in St Louis from Aug 12 to 14 to collaborate and plan future food safety initiatives. On the technical front, the FDA said it has developed a rapid detection system, using flow cytometry, to identify Escherichia coli and Salmonella in food and that the system is already being used in poultry processing facilities. FDA microbiologists trained at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Salmonella reference laboratory on a new molecular method, purchased for many of the FDA’s labs, for rapidly identifying Salmonella strains. Jul 1 CIDRAP News story “FDA requests backup in hunt for Salmonella source”last_img read more

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Autumn share mauling creates bargain buys

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Washington state sues florist who refuses gay ‘wedding’

first_imgSeattlepi.com 10 April 2013State Attorney General Bob Ferguson on Tuesday filed a consumer protection lawsuit against Arlene’s Flowers & Gifts, a Richland florist that refused to supply flowers to the same-sex marriage of a longtime customer. Ferguson said he sent a March 28 letter to owner Barronelle Stutzman asking her to reconsider and supply flowers to customer Robert Ingersoll.  Through an attorney, Stutzman declined to change her position. “As Attorney General, it is my job to enforce the laws of the state of Washington,” said Ferguson.  “Under the Consumer Protection Act, it is unlawful to discriminate against customers based on sexual orientation.  If a business provides a product or service to opposite-sex couples for their weddings, then it must provide same sex couples the same product or service.” The lawsuit by Ferguson is bound to revive a warning raised by opponents of marriage equality in last fall’s Washington Voter’s Pamphlet statement against Referendum 74.  Foes stated: “People who disagree with this new definition (of marriage) could find themselves facing sanctions, as has occurred elsewhere.  Church groups have lost their tax exemptions.  Small businesses were sued.  Wedding professionals have been fined.”Last month, Stutzman told KEPR-TV in the Tri-Cities: “He (Ingersoll) said he decided to get married and before he got through I grabbed his hand and said, ‘I am sorry.  I can’t do your wedding because of my relationship with Jesus Christ.’  We hugged each other and he left, and I assumed it was the end of the story.” Ingersoll and his partner, Curt Freed, were decade-long customers of Arlene’s Flowers & Gifts.  They went online with the refusal and the story went viral.  Stutzman refused to change her position, saying:  “It’s a personal conviction.  It’s not a matter of being right or wrong.  It’s my belief.”http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlepolitics/2013/04/09/ag-sues-florist-who-refused-flowers-to-gay-wedding/last_img read more

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