Limerick brothers have no plans to cash in on billion euro…

first_imgPrint BusinessNewsLimerick brothers have no plans to cash in on billion euro firmBy Editor – January 24, 2014 735 WhatsApp Email Patrick and John Collison of StripeLimerick entrepreneurs Patrick and John CollisonLIMERICK brothers Patrick and John Collison have no plans to cash in on the success of their €1.3 billion company and will use a €60 million round of fresh investment raised this week to fund international expansion.From Castletroy and now based in California, the Collisons created Stripe, a low-cost way for small companies to accept online payments, in 2009 and have been steadily building the business since.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up John (23) and Patrick (25), a former winner of the Young Scientist competition, created an online auction payments company, Auctomatic, which was sold for almost €4 million while they were still in secondary school at Castletroy College.Their latest success story began when they saw how difficult it was for small companies to accept payments from customers online.“We found it really hard in our previous business to accept payment over the internet. It felt like many other people would be having the same problem, so we set about solving it”, explained John.“We started working on Stripe almost two years before it launched publicly. There was a long period where we were writing code to support a small handful of users, and navigating a relatively unfamiliar industry.“We wrote the first lines of code in October 2009. Three months later, we got our first customer. We stayed going, writing code, starting to hire people and trying to find new customers. By the time we launched publicly in September 2011, we had ten people on the team.”Stripe now employs 83 people at its headquarters in San Francisco and the company has become a recognisable name in global ecommerce, with backers such as Paypal founder Peter Thiel and entrepreneur Elon Musk numbered among its investors.Social media giant Twitter is reportedly in discussions with the company over a deal that would allow Twitter enable companies to accept payments on the social media platform.However, Chief executive, Patrick Collison says that they won’t be in a rush to take advantage of the company’s latest valuation.“We’ve no interest in selling the company. John and I are very lucky to work with the people we do on building something for the long term, and we wouldn’t like to change that,” he said.This is also the view of his younger brother who said they were focused on opening international offices and delivering on Stripe’s goal of building an easier way of paying for goods and services online.“It’s still early days for the payment systems that power the internet. It’s outrageously difficult and expensive to move money between countries.“Fraud and storing credentials still cause merchants hassle. So online payments is a great place to go hunting for problems worth solving”, said John. First Irish death from Coronavirus Encourage Wildlife in Castletroy Park Elegant property in Monaleen #LimerickPostProperty Twitter Previous articleNo room at the Mansion House for Limerick manNext article40 jobs from Limerick environmenal firm expansion Editor center_img Shannondoc operating but only by appointment TAGSAutomaticCastletroyElon MuskfeaturedJohn CollisonMusic LimerickPatrick CollisonPeter TheilStripeTwitter Linkedin Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April No vaccines in Limerick yet last_img read more

Continue reading

Borlaug Fellows

first_imgAs part of the Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program, two visiting researchers are working to ensure the safety the peanut crop in Africa with the help of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The college’s Office of Global Programs hosted the researchers, Agnes Mwangwela from Malawi and Joelle Kajuga from Rwanda, for two months this fall and introduced them to UGA researchers who are working to solve the problem of aflatoxin contamination in peanuts.While in Georgia, both researchers studied aflatoxin sampling methods in crops and in the human body. Aflatoxin is a carcinogenic by-product of naturally occurring fungi that contaminate food through the soil — either during growth or during processing. The fungi and toxin contaminate numerous crops, but is often linked to peanuts and maize.“Agnes and Joelle are working on aflatoxin detection. Aflatoxin is a very serious issue where they are from. It is not as much of a threat here in the U.S., not because we don’t have aflatoxin, but because we have more systems in place to protect human health,” said Vicki McMaken, assistant director of the college’s Office of Global Programs.In developing countries such as Malawi and Rwanda, where peanuts are a large part of the daily diet, processing and sampling protocols are inadequate to prevent aflatoxin exposure. As a result, up to 4.5 billion people are exposed to aflatoxins each year.The United States Department of Agriculture’s Borlaug Fellowship Program is designed to provide research opportunities to early career scientists from developing or middle-income countries—with a focus on building food security and economic growth in the scholars’ home.“If I gain one technology, then I go back and we will have that for the benefit of my country,” said Kajuga, an award-winning agricultural researcher who leads a team of scientists as part of the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB) Horticulture Program.In Malawi and Rwanda, nearly 60 percent of the population lives below the poverty line, and agriculture is their economic mainstay, employing over 80 percent of the population. Cash crops such as groundnuts, known as peanuts in the U.S., are grown for consumption and for income.But processors do not purchase aflatoxin-laden peanuts and contaminated peanuts cannot be exported. This creates a food safety issue and limits the value of cash crops.”Most Malawians sort the groundnuts and will keep the low quality for consumption, and the good quality goes to the market,“ Mwangwela explained.Mwangwela hopes to change this. She is the senior lecturer in food science and dean of the faculty of food and human sciences at University of Malawi, Bunda College of Agriculture in Lilongwe.“When I go back to Malawi, I will be working with students from the university to equip farmers and small scale groundnut processors with the skills to sort out contaminated peanuts from the food supply,” said Mwangwela. “It is also important to educate the families.”This is one of the key elements of the Borlaug programs, according to McMaken. “The Borlaug program is very good at selecting scientists who are going to take what they learn and use it for the betterment of their country,” she said.The Borlaug fellows are selected each year based on research proposals submitted to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. When a (request for applications) is announced, U.S. universities bid to host the fellows at their institution. Host institutions identify research mentors and arrange logistics and the Borlaug program covers the costs.“We review the (request for application announcements) to see where there is a fit. With these fellows, because the Peanut & Mycotoxin Innovation Lab (PMIL) is located here at UGA, we knew we could connect these scholars with many different collaborators,” said McMaken.All of the Mwangela and Kajuga’s mentors are PMIL project collaborators.They were mentored at UGA primarily by Manjeet Chinnan, food science and technology professor emeritus, and J.S. Wang, professor and department head of the department of environmental health science. A third mentor, Kumar Mallikarjunan, professor of biological systems engineering, hosted the fellows at Virginia Tech during their visit.Before becoming a Borlaug fellow, Mwangwela was already working with PMIL lead scientist Rick Brandenburg on a Southern Africa Peanut Value Chain Intervention Project.Dave Hoisington, director of PMIL, escorted the scholars to the World Food Prize in Des Moines, Iowa. They also traveled through southwest Georgia as part of the annual Georgia Peanut Tour, visited JLA Testing Laboratory and Birdsong Peanuts Shelling Plant in Blakely and spent time at the USDA – Agricultural Research Service National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson.“This Borlaug program is beyond my expectations,” said Kajuga. “When I go back to Rwanda, I will be working on linking our scientists with the U.S. scientists working on aflatoxins.”As part of the Borlaug Fellowship Program, the mentors conduct follow up visits to Rwanda and Malawi to further ensure what was learned during the program at UGA is transferred back to the home countries.McMaken says that the Office of Global Programs plans to bring more Borlaug fellows to UGA to continue to further internationalize the campus.last_img read more

Continue reading

Ruth Martini

first_imgRuth C. (Hoffmeier) Martini died peacefully with her family at her bedside on Monday, December 4, 2017 at Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH.She leaves her eight children, Susan (Paul) Roell, William (Cathy) Martini, Joseph Martini, Patrick (Teresa) Martini, Dave Martini, Julie (Michael) Crawley, John (Maria) Martini, Mary Martini; and her 14 grandchildren, Logan, Julia, Kristy, Madeline, Mike, Catherine, Alex, Nick, Olivia, Nicole, Maleah, John, Jenna, Jacob; her sister Jean (Hoffmeier) Bonomoni and many close relatives and friends.She was preceded in death by her husband of 56 years Jerome (Jerry) Martini, infant daughter Linda Lee, her parents Joseph and Bessie Hoffmeier, granddaughter Rebecca Martini, daughter-in-law Denise Martini. Her brothers Edward, Robert (Red) and Bill Hoffmeier and sister AnnaJo (Hoffmeier) Kirchgassner.Ruth was born in Guilford, IN and moved to Yorkville, IN as a child. After graduating from Guilford High school she moved to Cincinnati, Ohio where she worked for Herschede’s underwriting later returning to Yorkville and working for Thatcher Glass.Ruth, along with her husband, Jerry, and brother-in law Floyd started “Jerry and Floyd’s Monarch Grill”; a landmark which greeted locals and travelers almost four decades from the late 1950’s to the early 1990’s. Ruth was the phenomenal cook at the highly acclaimed diner. She, along with husband Jerry managed Martini Nursery& Landscaping.She also was an avid horseback rider and loved animals. Ruth was well known for her cooking, supporting many of the nonprofit organizations in Dearborn County. Her roast beef and potato salad are well known classics at the St. Martin’s Church Festival.Ruth loved to travel taking all 8 of her children across the country, touching 47 states, countless national parks, and thousands of miles of countryside. Ruth was very proud of her Irish heritage. She had the biggest heart in the world, was a great inspiration and would do anything for her children, grandchildren, neighbors, and the entire Dearborn County community.A funeral service will be held at All Saints Parish (St. Martin’s Church) in Yorkville, IN; December 9th, 2017. Visitation will be from 9:15 AM to 1:00 PM with rosary at 9:15. Funeral Mass will be held at 1:30 PM.Memorials can be made to Sunman Life Squadlast_img read more

Continue reading

Deep wide receiver class jockeying at NFL scouting combine

first_imgDeep wide receiver class jockeying at NFL scouting combine Associated Press “I think in today’s day and age where these guys were starting 7-on-7, it’s almost like AAU basketball,” Packers GM Brian Gutekunst said. “The receivers are so much more advanced in terms of their fundamentals coming into college and the league than maybe they have been in the past. It’s really just the NFL offense that will take time. So I think there’s some guys sitting here today that I think will have a chance to make a pretty immediate impact, and I’m excited about that.”Receivers may still need to adjust to the NFL’s press coverage but just as often they’re the ones putting the DBs on their heels from the get-go.“Historically, receivers have struggled a little bit with the learning curve up to the NFL. But in the last three, four or five years, we’ve seen a lot of guys make immediate” impacts, said Ravens general manager Eric DeCosta. “Especially last year, if you look at the class, you’ll see a bunch of guys come in right away and make big plays. We were fortunate last year with Marquise and even Miles (Boykin) to a degree made plays for us. We’re excited about those two guys and we look at this year’s draft class as an opportunity for us to improve at the position even more.”Every team does. “So, there’s depth throughout and there’s quality up top,” Mayock said. And there’s jockeying for cream-of-the-crop status when they showcase their skills during on-field workouts at Lucas Oil Stadium in prime time on Thursday night.The best of the bunch is probably Jeudy or Lamb, but they all sport that one attribute that premier pass catchers also possess: a confidence bordering on cockiness.Jeudy said he’s the best, but he’s hearing everyone else say they’re the best.“I feel like everybody should think they’re the best receiver coming out in the class,” Jeudy said. “You’ve probably heard every GM and coach talk about this wide receiver class; it is a good one,” Jets GM Joe Douglas said. “Just watching them go across the stage, there is a lot of talented players and we see how much the pass game affects the National Football League. So we do feel good about this group.”Actually, teams feel great about the 2020 receivers.Teams are more willing than ever to bypass the old wait-and-watch standby for a plug-and-play approach with bigger, faster, quicker pass-catchers coming out such as Calvin Ridley and D.J. Moore who made an immediate impact in 2018, followed by Deebo Samuel, DK Metcalf, Marquise Brown, Terry McLaurin and A.J. Brown, who wasted no time establishing their credentials last season.“There is a lot more receivers coming into the draft because there’s just a lot more receivers in college football and high school football,” Rams GM Les Snead said. “A lot of teams running three, four, five wides.”It starts way before college. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditINDIANAPOLIS (AP) — If your favorite NFL team doesn’t have a Tyreek Hill, Julio Jones or Courtland Sutton streaking down the field, making cornerbacks cringe and constantly redefining the highlight catch, just wait.Chances are good they’ll grab one in this year’s draft.The NFL scouting combine in Indianapolis features a tantalizing wide receiver class unlike anything ever seen at the league’s annual gathering of top prospects.center_img February 26, 2020 “I think it’s a combination of things,” Washington Redskins coach Ron Rivera said. “I think teams are starting to understand how you use players. But I also do think because the ball is being thrown so much in college football the receiver is learning to be an explosive guy. “I also think the body types of the receivers is changing,” Rivera said. “I think they’re getting bigger and stronger. There’s a lot more guys that are coming out that are ready to go and are dynamic players. The guys I think people are really looking for are these bigger receivers who are dynamic with the ball in their hands.”Guys such as Colorado’s Laviska Shenault, Alabama’s Jerry Jeudy and Henry Ruggs III, Oklahoma’s CeeDee Lamb, LSU’s Justin Jefferson, Arizona State’s Brandon Aiyuk and Clemson’s Tee Higgins.Just to name a few.The wide receiver group is “as deep as I’ve seen,” NFL draft analyst Daniel Jeremiah said. “I’ve got 27 wide receivers with top-three round grades in this draft. And consider average 31 are taken. We had a max of 35 taken in (2015). So this is a really phenomenal group of wideouts.” There’s someone for everyone this year, whether they’re looking for a deep threat, a crisp route-runner, a fearless man going over the middle or even taking the direct snap like Shenault did so often at Colorado.“Receiver, of all positions, probably comes in the Baskin Robbins 31 favors,” Bills general manager Brandon Beane said. “Size, speed, length, run after catch, all sorts of variables.”This year, especially.“I think there could be a lot of guys drafted all the way through from 1 to 7 (rounds),” Beane said. “We were talking about it the other day. There’s going to be guys drafted on the third day of the draft who may come in and take a veteran’s spot on a team. It’s that deep.”Las Vegas Raiders GM Mike Mayock noted an average of 12 wide receivers have been selected in the first three rounds over the past decade, and this year’s group features twice that number who are graded by teams as top-100 talents. They all might end up being part of the best wide receiver class ever.___Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapleton___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more

Continue reading