Lockn’ Adds Jim James, Phil Lesh & Friends With moe., And More With Daily Lineup Reveal

first_imgLockn’ in Arrington, Virginia, has been slowly revealing its line up over the past week, with yesterday bringing the news that Phil Lesh and Bob Weir will perform the entirety of Terrapin Station with the Terrapin Family Band during a special performance at the festival. On Monday, Antibalas, Blackberry Smoke, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Hiss Golden Messenger, Moonalice, The Record Company, and Sinkane were added to the bill. Tuesday’s announcement added John Fogerty, and Wednesday added The Disco Biscuits to the list. Today, Lockn’ revealed its daily schedule, bringing to light even more special surprises for attendees of the festival.The daily lineup reveals that Jim James will be performing a solo set on Friday. phil.moe. will also be making their debut on Sunday, which will be a variation of Phil Lesh & Friends with moe. You can check out the full daily schedule below, and get your tickets to and more information about Lockn’ here.last_img read more

Continue reading

Chris Curtis not worried about last year’s champ, playoff seeding heading into second PFL appearance

first_imgJoin DAZN and watch more than 100 fight nights a yearBefore there was Brendan Loughnane, there was Chris Curtis.Much like the 29-year-old featherweight from Manchester, England, Curtis appeared on the first episode of a new season, carrying an impressive record and a wealth of regional experience into a tough matchup to kick off Season 2 of the UFC’s latest talent search series. He dominated the action and finished the fight in the third round, landing a beautiful hook kick 90 seconds into the final stanza that ultimately led to the bout being halted.But when White convened with Laura Sanko to announce which fighters had earned contracts, Curtis’ name wasn’t mentioned. Alonzo Menifield and Greg Hardy, both of whom scored hellacious first-round knockout wins, were tabbed to join the UFC ranks.Three days after his appearance in Las Vegas, “The Action Man” announced his retirement from the sport.“At that point, it’s a 12-year journey,” said Curtis, reflecting on the events of last summer. “I get there, I’m like, ‘Here’s my contract, finally.’ I do everything and get passed up, it sucked, and on top of that, I go home with a broken hand.“It was just interesting after the Contender Series because you put all that time and effort in. I was training across the country, away from my kids — it sucks for my family because of all the time and money that you spend. It just sucked.”And so he hung up his four-ounce gloves.After the hurt dissipated and his injuries healed, a conversation with one of his long-time training partners set Curtis on the path back to competing inside the cage.“Sam Alvey was one of the guys that made me realize that I don’t really have many options,” said Curtis, who ultimately sided with the Professional Fighters League (PFL) to compete in the company’s welterweight division. “What else am I going to do with my time? I’ve spent 12 years working on being the best fighter I could be, so I kind of have one path to follow.“I fought earlier this year to get back into it, test the waters and I felt good, and then this came up and I jumped at it,” he added. “I wanted to be in the UFC, I wanted my fight kit, but a million bucks buys a lot of personalized fight kits, so I’ll just do that instead.”Fighting on the first event of the 2019 season, Curtis scored a third-round stoppage win over Andre Fialho, pushing his winning streak to eight and earning him four points — good for fifth place in the division heading into his second and final regular season matchup later this week in Atlantic City, New Jersey.“More than the points, it was good to get out there,” he explained. “Everybody was telling me I had the best fight that night. I’m in a new gym — I moved to Vegas, so that’s different — and I have a new coach in John Wood. It’s just nice to go out there and perform, show that I made a good decision, the right changes.“To have the fans really love me and say I’m one of the best fights they’ve seen so far means a lot to me. It’s just validation that I’m at that level,” he added. “I’ve heard a lot of people say the UFC really screwed up not signing me and that means the world to me honestly.”Having already made an impact with the fans, Curtis has the opportunity to make an impact on the standings as he gears up for the playoffs and takes on 2018 welterweight champion Magomed Magomedkerimov on Thurday evening in the main event of PFL 4 of the 2019 season at the Ocean Casino Resort.The 29-year-old Magomedkerimov was an unknown to most North American fight fans prior to last year’s PFL season, when he scored wins over Herman Terrado and Bojan Velickovic to advance to the playoffs and then beat Pavel Kusch and Velickovic again to advance to the finals, where he submitted heavy favorite Ray Cooper III to claim the welterweight title and $1 million.In his first appearance of this year, the returning champion was one of three fighters to collect six points, submitting UFC veteran John Howard in the opening round.“The only thing more dangerous than one Magomed is two Magomeds,” joked Curtis. “At the same time, he’s the champion from last year and I respect that — it’s cool, congrats to him — but I didn’t fight in this tournament last year, so him being the champion doesn’t mean a thing to me. It just doesn’t.“You beat people that weren’t me,” he continued. “You beat Ray Cooper III. I’m not really impressed by that.”In addition to not particularly caring about Magomedkerimov’s success last season, the soon-to-be 32-year-old isn’t overly worried about playoff seeding as he heads into his second regular season appearance of the year.His win over Fialho earned him four points, good for fifth place in the standings, one point ahead of Handersson Ferreira, one point behind Cooper III and two points back of Magomedkerimov, Glaico Franca and Sadibou Sy, all of whom scored first-round finishes and garnered six points.Because of how the welterweights have been paired off for their second event of the regular season, Curtis isn’t guaranteed a place in the playoffs just yet, but he’s confident that he’ll earn a victory on Thursday night and doesn’t care whether he heads into the playoffs as the first or eighth seed. “Before PFL, had you heard of Magomedkerimov?” asked Curtis. “You hadn’t and no one else had either. That was his coming out party and he’s not a guy that anyone really cares about. I’m going to beat him up and after this tournament, you’re never going to hear about Magomed Magomedkerimov ever again.“As far as seeding, I’m not concerned,” he added. “In my head, I’m going into this tournament thinking I’m the very best in the tournament, bar none, so at this point, I don’t care who I have to fight — I’m going to win. I can beat everyone in this tournament, so I don’t really care. I just want to move it along.“I can beat everyone here — I know that I can — so I don’t worry about the seeding too much.” A couple weeks back, MMA fans rallied to Brendan Loughnane’s side after the British standout didn’t receive a contract following his victory over Bill Algeo on the Contender Series.Loughnane, who won the fight handily and has built an excellent record fighting on the smaller stages, seemed like an obvious choice to get a contract, but instead, the UFC President went in a different direction, passing on Loughnane and criticizing his decision to shoot for a takedown in the final 10 seconds rather than “going for the finish,” as if he had Algeo teetering on the brink of collapse and gave him a reprieve.last_img read more

Continue reading

Scanning Middletown’s Open Space

first_imgBy Jay Cook |MIDDLETOWN –Middletown is the largest municipality in Monmouth County, but when it comes to the amount of land set aside for open space, how does it compare to others?Better than you would think, Middletown Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger told residents earlier this week.Spread across 41 square miles, Middletown has about 5,500 acres of preserved open space inside its township borders – and up to 6,000 if land with conservation easements are counted, Scharfenberger said.To put it in perspective, that’s equal in total acreage to the size of two Atlantic Highlands, four Fair Havens and seven Sea Brights. “That’s very impressive, and I don’t think people realize the extent of what we have here,” Scharfenberger said.The Dec. 5 land use forum at the Middletown Arts Center was the fourth held by Scharfenberger and township administrator Tony Mercantante in the past 18 months. Other land use forums focused on development and redevelopment, revitalizing Route 36 and land-use planning. Tuesday night’s theme was how to prevent overdevelopment while encouraging sensible growth. The officials gave an overview on Middletown’s current open space situation, which they believe will improve as 2018 approaches.Looking at the NumbersMercantante said Middletown has been active in acquiring open space through the state Green Acres program since around 1999. The program provides funding so municipalities can add land to their inventories.According to Mercantante, there have been 17 Green Acres acquisitions totaling 223 acres. The total purchase cost is about $26 million, of which the township was obliged to pay $10.3 million, with the remainder covered by different public and private entities.“The biggest challenge is negotiating with property owners, trying to come to terms with acquiring a piece of property and then decide why we’re acquiring it,” Mercantante said.The most expensive of those 17 properties is the 40-acre Fisher-Stern plot, which became part of the Monmouth County Park System in 2005 as the Claypit Creek extension to Hartshorne Woods. The property was acquired with help from the county, Monmouth Conservation Foundation (MCF), the state’s Green Acres Program and the township. That single purchase cost those entities a total of $10.4 million at the time, with Middletown paying $1.9 million.Middletown open space purchases are funded through a two-cent tax per $100 of assessed property valuation, Scharfenberger said. That open space tax first commenced in 1999, when Middletown became active in purchasing property.That tax complements the new county Open Space Trust Fund tax increase approved by voters in November. When it goes into effect in 2018, the county projects over $14 million more annually available in the fund.Scharfenberger said the final piece to the open space puzzle should come in the next calendar year. About $1.5 million is owed to Middletown by the state through purchase reimbursements. Not having that money has limited the township, both officials said, and they anticipate more purchases coming in the near future.“Now we’re building a little bit of a war chest and looking around to purchase more open space as those reimbursements come in from the state,” Scharfenberger said.Success StoriesPreserving the right pieces of land has been the focus of Middletown’s open space mission over the past two decades, Mercantante said. With it comes the balance of preservation and development, considering “every property owner has the right to utilize their property in some reasonable fashion,” he said.Outside of the Fisher-Stern property, he highlighted two other instances where residential or commercial development was halted and that land was purchased.The first piece of open space is Bicentennial Park, a 10-acre swath of wooded land, a brook and pond, with a walking pier out to the water. It’s bordered by Route 35 South (and a Burger King) but stretches back along Twin Brooks Avenue and Spruce Drive on either side. Mercantante said the “great piece of open space” was proposed as a condo-office complex but the township stepped in to purchase the area. The $850,000 total price tag cost Middletown $425,000.The other noted property is Swimming River Park, a county-owned park planned for redevelopment in the next few years. For decades the site was Chris’ Landing, a popular boat launch for small watercraft and recreational kayakers, anchored by Chris’ Deli on site. Scharfenberger said a developer had plans to build a housing complex on the 16-acre site, but MCF and the county stepped in to purchase the land for $3.8 million in 2015.Refurbishing Forgotten ParksWith 49 active parks in town ranging from Lincroft to Leonardo, some have fallen by the wayside and could be earmarked for upgrades or new uses.The best example, Mercantante said, is the forlorn Camp Hope buried back in Lincroft Acres off Newman Springs Road. The old campground is accessible by a dirt road behind the two soccer fields and is surrounded by the Swimming River watershed.The day camp for children with disabilities was shut down about a decade ago and remains closed. In the years since, the pool, pergola, picnic tables and facilities have fallen into disrepair. This year, Mercantante said a nonprofit organization contacted the town looking to reestablish a summer camp in Middletown, and Camp Hope was the first location on his mind.Middletown is working with them now, he said, to install another pool and improve the facilities.Finding new purposes for other recreational parks in town will be a focus as well. Mercantante said repurposing Middletown’s three outdoor roller hockey rinks will be on the agenda. Two of those are currently shut down, he said, and the third is scarcely used anymore. What could they turn into? Maybe pickleball, he said, considering the sport’s growing popularity and requests from residents.“Those are the kinds of things we always have to be mindful of in the future, either using existing fields or construction of new ones,” Mercantante said.On the other hand, there are no plans to replace the Cavadas Skate Park on Pulsch Street in Belford, Scharfenberger said.Opened in 2003 after being purchased for $165,000, the 0.7-acre skate park was shut down by the township in 2010 amid concerns from township police. Scharfenberger said the “major league headache” had over 500 complaints to the police in one year. “It just didn’t pay for the upkeep and constant repairs,” he said.“We see no need nor desire on our part to reopen it,” he added. “That’s closed for the foreseeable future.”This article was first published in the Dec. 7-14, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Continue reading

Kootenay Ice let one slip away, drop 4-3 decision to Fraser Valley

first_imgCoy Prevost of Kimberley and Ross Amour also scored for the Ice.Justin Bowerman scored twice to lead the T-Birds.Saturday, Kootenay, playing perhaps its best game of the season, scored a season high seven goals en route to the lopsided victory.“We had a fantastic game Saturday,” Wright exclaimed. “Even Sunday I thought the guys played very hard and deserved better.”Trevor Van Steinburg of Cranbrook scored twice to lead the Ice.Spencer McLean of Montrose, Ryan Neil of Fruitvale, Podgorenko, Nelson’s Sam Weber and Jacob Yuris of Trail also scored for the Ice.Provost, a Western Hockey League draft pick of the Saskatoon Blades, finished Saturday’s game with three assists.Jason Mailhiot and Carson Schamerhorn, both of Trail shared the netminding duties in goal during the weekend for Kootenay.Kootenay takes to the road for two very tough games Saturday and Sunday against the Vancouver Northwest Giants.The Giants hold down second spot in league standings, four points behind leading Okanagan Rockets.“This will be a very good test for us,” said Wright. “So we’re going to focus on having a great week of practice and work on our zone coverage in the defensive zone.” The Kootenay Ice missed a golden opportunity to climb the B.C. Hockey Major Midget League standings during a weekend home series.Costly penalties down the stretch proved to unravel the Ice, allowing the Fraser Valley Thunderbirds to escape with a 4-3 victory Sunday at the NDCC Arena.Kootenay, 3-9-2 on the season, remain a point behind Fraser Valley and five back in the race for the final playoff spot. The Ice opened the two-game set Saturday with a 7-3 victory in Nelson.“For the first time this season we got a little undisciplined and that cost us,” said Ice skipper Robbie Wright.“(Fraser Valley) is a big strong club and a couple of their guys started running around and got under our skin.”“But overall on the weekend I thought we played well, it was just a couple of bad penalties that really hurt us Sunday,” Wright added.Trailing 3-1 in the third, Nelson’s Justin Podgorenko pulled Kootenay to within a marker of Fraser Valley.However, the Ice took three penalties, two at the 9:34 mark of the third period with the Thunderbirds already being assess a minor penalty, to kill any momentum.last_img read more

Continue reading