D.J. Williams’ Celebrating Homecoming To United States With “Deportation Celebration” In Hollywood

first_imgD.J. Williams is performing a surprise homecoming show next Wednesday, June 14th, following his arrival home to the United States, with his solo group D. J. Williams’ Shots Fired — an all-star collective of funk musicians from across the scene. The celebration, dubbed “D.J.’s Deportation Celebration – a Welcome Home Party,” follows Williams’ detainment in the Middle East, which saw the guitarist of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe held over an issue at customs, and his subsequent release back to the United States.Slated for Interscope Records’ showcase room, The Peppermint Club, in West Hollywood, the night is sure to be a jubilant welcoming party for those who missed the musician while he was away. For D.J.’s Deportation Celebration, Williams will be joined by Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band), Max MacVeety (Lyrics Born), Pete Griffin (Dr. John), David Veith (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe) and Kenneth Crouch (Eric Clapton/Lenny Kravitz). In a statement, Williams said, “It’s been a hell of a ride to get here, but I’m back and ready to rage with my Shots Fired crew once again!” Tickets for this intimate, limited-space show at The Peppermint are on-sale now, with advanced ticket purchases encouraged. You can get tickets here.last_img read more

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For Supreme Court justices, faith in law

first_imgThe mood was festive, rather than disputatious, on Friday evening as Supreme Court Associate Justices Stephen G. Breyer, J.D. ’64, and Neil M. Gorsuch, J.D. ’91, sat down to discuss “the rule of law.”The conversation, moderated by Jeffrey Rosen ’86, president of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, capped a Harvard Marshall Forum dinner in the Harvard Art Museums’ courtyard, celebrating the 70th anniversary of the trans-Atlantic scholarship, which Breyer won in 1959 and Gorsuch did in 1992. And although both justices spent some time recalling their experiences as Marshall scholars, in his first public appearance since joining the court in April Gorsuch dropped some intriguing hints about his views of the law and the role of the court.Speaking of the traits shared by the British and U.S. legal systems, the new justice stressed the importance of law and the primacy of the court. Referring to a “common heritage,” he cited the shared “sense that judges can safely decide the law without fear of reprisal.” This holds true, he said, no matter who is the plaintiff or defendant, as he added that in our system “the government can lose a judgment in its own courts and accept that judgment.”Speaking a day after President Trump called for the Supreme Court to review the lower court decision to block his executive order on immigration, Gorsuch’s words took on extra weight as he said: “That’s how we resolve differences in this country.”Both justices stressed the importance of the general acceptance of rule of law, as well as the civility of the court. The justices shake hands before ascending to the bench, explained Gorsuch, who described the institution as “just nine people in polyester black robes.”“Nine people appointed by six presidents,” he noted. “We’re unanimous about 40 percent of the time.”The exceptions are notable, but even so the rule of law holds. Breyer, for example, brought up Bush v. Gore, which decided the 2000 presidential election. “It was wrong, in my opinion,” the justice said. “But people followed it. They did not go out … and shoot other people.”Comparing the British and U.S. systems, Gorsuch noted the similarities, stemming from the Magna Carta, in that both are adversarial and based on the notion of “certain human rights” and “limited government.”In terms of differences, Gorsuch noted the American system of judicial review, which allows courts to strike down existing law. Some British justices, he said, find this “very worrisome,” adding that this possibility “may be worrisome to some here” as well.He later discussed how only small a percentage of the cases (roughly 300,000 annually) that come before the Supreme Court ever make it onto its docket of 80 or so, “in a good year.”Following an acknowledgments of the work by moderator Rosen (a Marshall scholar in 1988) with the nonpartisan Constitution Center, both justices briefly discussed the role of this foundational document. Gorsuch noted, “Our Constitution was aimed at preserving, not preventing, certain civil liberties.”To an audience of dignitaries and fellow Marshall scholars, the justices spent much of the hourlong conversation in fond reminiscence. Both discussed having their worldviews broadened by the scholarship, which for both was a first overseas experience. Both have since married British women, Gorsuch meeting his future wife in Christ Church Hall at Oxford. This prompted Breyer to note, “I too have married a British woman, and she’s beautiful, but it’s not the same one.”last_img read more

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Peanut 2012 outlook

first_imgThe peanut industry learned a lesson last year: Farmers don’t feel they have to drop peanut seed into the ground unless the price is right for their efforts. Georgia farmers last year planted the fewest peanuts in three decades. By harvest, this move pushed prices to more than $1,000 per ton, the highest in recent history. But that was last year. What about this one?“2012 is looking better, at least the start of 2012. Prices are better than they were last year going into spring. … We should see a better year or better outlook for peanuts. There’s a lower supply, so we need more acres,” said Nathan Smith, a farm economist with the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.Early contracts for 2012 peanuts are going between $650 and $750 per ton, still good prices. But if farmers plant without securing contracts first, they are taking a risk this year, Smith said. In this episode of In the Field, Brad Haire, news director with UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Smith talk about what farmers should do to wisely market this year’s crop.Watch Peanut prices hold strong, 2012 acreage still question.last_img read more

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Young Students Honor Local Heroes

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisIn honor of Veterans Day students at Besser and Lincoln elementary gave a special tribute to local veterans and active duty members. For 6 years now the two elementary schools have been hosting this event to teach students about Veterans Day and to let the vets know they will never be forgotten.Veterans sat with smiles on their faces as they witnessed the young children sing songs about America with pride. Students expressed their gratitude and appreciation with heartfelt messages to the veterans. This day means so much to the students but, it’s the veterans appreciate this day the mostAt a young age these students learn about bravery loyalty and honor, all while being in the presence of American heros.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Thinner Winner to Name a New Champ This Friday NightNext Senator Gary Peters Fights Opioid Addiction in Adolescents With YOUTH Act Billlast_img read more

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