US Defence Department releases report on fatal shooting of Reuters journalist

first_img Related documents Reuters_20Final_t_20Version-4.pdfPDF – 2.84 MB News Download the US Defence Department report Organisation RSF_en The US Defence Department has released a report confirming that US soldiers were responsible for the fatal shooting of a Reuters journalist three years ago. Reporters without borders shares the report’s view that the US military’s rules of engagement need to be harmonised with the procedures followed by the media in dangerous situations and it pledges to monitor whether the US military takes measures to ensure that such tragedies to not recur. Reporters Without Borders notes that a US Defence Department report released on 16 June confirms that US soldiers were responsible for the fatal shooting of Reuters soundman Waleed Khaled in Baghdad on 28 August 2005. The press freedom organisation shares the report’s view that the US military’s rules of engagement need to be harmonised with the procedures followed by the media in dangerous situations and it pledges to monitor whether the US military takes measures to ensure that such tragedies to not recur.Khaled drove with Reuters cameraman Haider Kadhem to the Baghdad district of Al-Adil to cover a situation in which an Iraqi police unit had been ambushed. When they arrived, their vehicle came under fire from US soldiers who had rushed to the scene and taken up position on the roof of a building. Khaled, who was at the wheel of their vehicle, was shot once in the face and four times in the chest, and died on the spot. Kadhem sustained only minor injuries.“The report’s conclusions leave no doubt about the US army’s responsibility,” Reporters Without Borders said. “But its examination of the behaviour of the soldiers and Reuters journalists reveals each party’s ignorance about the rules of engagement and safety procedures followed by the other party. It is incomprehensible that it has taken five years after the start of the war in Iraq to realise that, the US military did not brief the media about the rules that journalists should respect when facing soldiers during clashes in the field.”The organisation added: “This report does not absolve the soldiers of their responsibility for Khaled’s death. Whatever the circumstances of the Reuters journalist’s death, sanctions should be taken against those who fired the shots.”Safety rules and media-hostile terrain – a dilemma for Iraqi journalistsKhaled’s death could perhaps have been avoided. It happened because the Reuters crew misunderstood the warning signals from the US soldiers and because the soldiers misinterpreted the TV crew’s intentions when they put their vehicle into reverse in order to leave the scene. The US military criticised the TV crew for entering a fire-fight zone without protective equipment and in an unmarked vehicle. According to the report’s conclusions, there was no reason to think the vehicle’s occupants were journalists, and the soldiers said they thought Kadhem’s camera was an anti-tank rocket launcher.Reuters advises its staff to withdraw from combat zones when the risks become too great. But the US military’s rules of engagement regard a hasty withdrawal as suspicious. In such situations, the military recommends immobilising the vehicle until the perimeter has been secured. Kadhem and Khaled had not been informed of this.The situation on the ground in Iraq does not allow journalists to work safely. Armed groups have been operating with impunity throughout the country, targeting journalists, for more than five years. As a result, journalists have to take care not to be identified. In all, 216 journalists and media assistants have been killed in Iraq since the start of the war in March 2003. Most of them were ambushed outside their home or workplace. As a result, many journalists conceal their profession and are unable to go around vehicles bearing their news media’s logo.A total of 10 journalists have been killed by US gunfire in separate incidents since the start of the war. Three of them worked for Reuters. The reports of the military investigations into these incidents concluded in each case that the victims were shot accidentally.Flawed initial investigationAn initial enquiry conducted by a US officer was disputed by Reuters, which had the services of business consultants specialised in risk management. The soldiers who fired the shorts were not told to put their statements in writing and went back to their duties without being forbidden to talk about the case so that they would not come to an agreed version of the incident. The investigating officer also incorporated their statements into his report without trying to question other witnesses. Even more seriously, after the investigation, he lost the original videotape that Kadhem filmed in the minutes prior to the shooting. Nonetheless, the panel that viewed it before its disappearance did not think it contained grounds for disputing the report’s conclusions. The officer submitted his conclusions to his superiors on 31 August 2005, four days after the incident.The US Defence Department ordered the second investigation after Reuters released its own report on the incident in March 2006. A ballistic study, the autopsy on Khaled’s body, the statements of additional witness and an examination of the scene of the shooting, including estimates of the distances between the target and those who fired the shots, resulted in a more thorough report that lends more credibility to the conclusions, which were similar to those of the initial investigation.On the same subject:2.09.2005 – US army recognises firing on two-member Reuters TV crew News Help by sharing this information IraqMiddle East – North Africa News June 19, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 US Defence Department releases report on fatal shooting of Reuters journalist Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” to go further RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” News Follow the news on Iraq December 28, 2020 Find out more IraqMiddle East – North Africa Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan Receive email alerts February 15, 2021 Find out more December 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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64 patients waiting for beds in UHL

first_imgLimerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live University Hospital Limerick Email WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads 263 admitted patients are waiting for beds this morning, according to today’s INMO Trolley Watch.227 patients are waiting in the emergency department, while 36 are in wards elsewhere in the hospital. Facebook Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick LimerickNews64 patients waiting for beds in UHLBy Staff Reporter – March 22, 2021 216 Print RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Previous articleWATCH: Treaty United pick up 2-1 win over Athlone Town in final pre-season gameNext articleMinister Collins welcomes €418,662 in Limerick outdoor funding Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener last_img read more

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Update on the latest sports

first_img— The Tampa Bay Lightning closed their facilities Thursday after five team employees tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a person with knowledge of the situation. The person tells The Associated Press the team and the NHL haven’t announced the closure. The NHL is also no longer announcing which teams individual players tested positive. The developments come some two weeks after players were allowed to return to their respective facilities to take part in voluntary on- and off-ice workouts.— Canada has approved a National Hockey League plan to play in Canada amid the coronavirus pandemic. The plan required an exemption as the U.S.-Canada border is currently closed to all non-essential travel until at least July 21 and those who enter Canada must self-isolate for 14 days. The league plans to have training camps open in July and to play games without spectators in a couple of cities in late July or August. Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland says Canada’s top public health officer as well as the top health officers of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Toronto worked closely with the NHL to approve the plan.— Japanese baseball has managed to do what American baseball has not: play ball. The world’s second-most famous league has opened a season that will be shortened from its regular 143 games to 120. That’s twice as many MLB figures to play. The regular season is to end on Nov. 7 and be followed by post-season play. The start of the season was delayed for three months by the coronavirus pandemic. All 12 teams were scheduled to begin play in stadiums without fans. Two games were in open-air stadiums in Tokyo and Yokohama. The other four were in domed facilities in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka and Saitama prefecture.— A person with knowledge of the decision tells The Associated Press that Albert Pujols (POO’-hohlz) will pay the salaries of the Los Angeles Angels’ furloughed employees in his native Dominican Republic for five months. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because Pujols didn’t publicly announce his commitment to pay roughly $180,000 to cover the salaries. The strict budget cuts made by Angels owner Arte Moreno during the coronavirus pandemic have included extensive furloughs for scouts, player development staff and minor league employees. The furloughs also included most of the staff of their Dominican academy in Boca Chica.AMERICA PROTESTS-SPORTS — The NCAA is expanding its policy banning states with prominent Confederate symbols from hosting its sponsored events. The current ban, in place since 2001, prevents states from hosting what the NCAA calls predetermined sites, such as men’s basketball tournament games. Mississippi is the only state currently affected by the policy. The expanded policy means that even when sites of games are determined by performance as they are in sports such as baseball and women’s basketball, Mississippi schools will not be permitted to host NCAA tournament games.NFL-NEWS49ers wide receiver Richie James Jr. breaks right wristUNDATED (AP) — San Francisco 49ers receiver Richie James Jr. has broken his right wrist during offseason workouts and won’t be ready to return to the field until after the start of training camp.The 49ers confirmed a report of the injury by NFL Network on Friday and said they will have a better idea of how long James will be sidelined after he reports to training camp next month. NFL Network said James is expected to miss at least two months. In other developments related to the national protests against racial injustice:— The agency that manages RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., removed a statue of George Preston Marshall, who moved the team from Boston to Washington. Marshall resisted integrating the team with black players until “forced to do so” in 1962, according to his biography on the Pro Football Hall of Fame website. Marshall was inducted into the Hall in 1963; he died in 1969. Events DC officials called the removal on Friday “a small and overdue step on the road to lasting equality and justice.” A Redskins spokesman did not immediately comment.— Former NFL quarterback and civil rights activist Colin Kaepernick is helping to fund the cost of legal representation for some protesters who were arrested during demonstrations in the days after George Floyd’s death. The Star Tribune reports that Kaepernick’s Know Your Rights Foundation has donated what’s described as a “substantial” sum to attorneys nationwide. Kaepernick is the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who took a knee in 2016 during the national anthem to protest police brutality. He started his Know Your Rights Camp Legal Defense Initiative amid widespread protests following Floyd’s death. The fund won’t say how much money has been raised.— Many teams from the major U.S. pro leagues stopped to commemorate Juneteenth — the celebration of what occurred June 19, 1865, the day that all enslaved black people in the U.S. learned they had been freed from bondage. The day carried particular importance this year, with teams recognizing the day as important enough to declare it a paid holiday for workers — acknowledging the problems the country is facing today after several weeks of protests demanding the elimination of police brutality and racial inequality.— A group of black Major League Soccer players has formed a coalition to address systematic racism in their communities and bring about change within the league. The coalition is the result of an Instagram group that began after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, which spawned a wave of nationwide protests against racism and policy brutality. Started by Toronto FC defender Justin Morrow, the group grew to some 70 MLS players, who decided to act and the Black Players Coalition of MLS was born.  Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditVIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTSPhillies close Florida camp after 5 players test positiveUNDATED (AP) — Five players for the Philadelphia Phillies have tested positive for COVID-19 at the team’s spring camp in Florida, prompting the club to indefinitely close the complex. The team also said Friday that three staff members at the camp have tested positive. The club didn’t identify any of those affected. Philadelphia has shut the camp in Clearwater, Florida, to players, coaches and staff while medical authorities assess the situation. Update on the latest sports The announcement came while Major League Baseball owners and players try to negotiate a deal to begin the season amid the coronavirus pandemic, including health protocols. Some players had been recently been working out at spring training sites while practicing social distancing.The sides had hoped to have players begin testing Tuesday and then begin a second round of spring training on June 26. Most teams would likely hold those workouts at their home ballparks, rather than at their spring camps in Florida and Arizona.In other developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic:— Five-time PGA Tour winner Nick Watney tested positive Friday for the coronavirus, the first player with a confirmed infection since golf resumed its schedule last week. Watney withdrew immediately withdrew from the RBC Heritage and must self-isolate for at least 10 days under the PGA Tour’s protocols. He did not return a telephone call seeking comment. Watney played the opening round with Vaughn Taylor and Luke List.— An unidentified San Francisco 49ers player has reportedly tested positive for COVID-19 after an informal workout with teammates in Tennessee. The NFL Network reported that one player who took part in the workouts this week in Nashville has tested positive. All the players who were there will now get tested to see if there is any spread. The team declined to comment, citing federal and state privacy laws about the personal health of employees.center_img Twins remove ex-owner Griffith statue over racist remarksUNDATED (AP) — The Minnesota Twins have removed a statue of former owner Calvin Griffith at Target Field, citing racist remarks he made in 1978.Griffith’s statue was one of several installed when the team opened its ballpark in 2010. Griffith moved the Washington Senators to Minnesota for the 1961 season, and the team was renamed the Twins. During a 1978 speech to a Waseca Lions club, Griffith said he decided to do make the move “when I found out you only had 15,000 blacks here.” The team says it “cannot remain silent and continue ignoring the racist comments he made in Waseca.”Spokesman Dustin Morse said the removal was an internal decision, but the team had “certainly heard from outside fans and the community over the years” about Griffith’s remarks.Griffith sold the Twins to banker Carl Pohlad in 1984. June 19, 2020 James is the second receiver lost to injury this week for the defending NFC champion 49ers. No. 1 wideout Deebo Samuel underwent surgery Thursday to repair a fracture in his left foot suffered during informal player workouts in Tennessee. Samuel said he expects to be back in 10 weeks, meaning his will miss the start of training camp but should be healthy for the season opener Sept. 13.In other NFL news:— The New York Jets have agreed to terms with Baylor wide receiver Denzel Mims, their second-round draft pick in April, according to a person with knowledge of the deal. Mims fits a major need for a Jets offense that lost its top wideout, Robby Anderson, to Carolina in free agency. Chosen 59th overall, Mims will get a four-year deal worth about $5.5 million. New York has signed only one of its 2020 draftees, fifth-round cornerback Bryce Hall of Virginia.— NFL Network and NFL RedZone went dark on DISH Network and Sling TV last night as both sides try to reach a new distribution agreement. The lack of an agreement impacts 11.32 million subscribers. DISH has 9.01 million and Sling TV accounts for another 2.31 million. The NFL is still deep into the offseason with preseason games not scheduled to begin for another two months. Associated Press last_img read more

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