Primary election results signal changes for the Democratic Party

first_imgPaige Megyesihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paige-megyesi/ printElection season is back in the Lone Star State! Democrats gained momentum Tuesday with increased voter turnout from the last primaries four years ago, while Republicans saw little change in turnout.More than 20,000 additional ballots were cast for Democratic candidates in the Tarrant County primaries this year than in 2014. About 10,000 more ballots were cast during early voting for Democratic candidates compared to early voting in 2014. Total early voter turnout for Democratic and Republican candidates rose from 64,267 in 2014 to 80,345 in 2018.Voter turnout for the Democratic party was the highest it’s been in years, as 1,037,799 Democratic voters cast a ballot for the U.S. Senate Seat alone. During the 2014 primary, Democrats only had a turnout of 560,033 voters in total, according to information from the Secretary of State’s office.Data from Texas Secretary of State.Tarrant County voters at Tanglewood Elementary shared their thoughts about the importance of voting in local, as well as presidential, elections.Tuesday’s primaries determined the candidate each party will be putting on the ballot for the midterms this year.A runoff election in May will determine the candidates who do not receive at least 51 percent of votes in the primary election. This year the Democratic candidates for Texas governor will have a runoff election in May.Former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez led the charge for Texas governor with more votes than the other eight candidates, but not enough to hold a majority.Election March 6Venngage InfographicsIn the much-anticipated Senate seat showdown: El Paso Representative Beto O’Rourke, who has been actively campaigning and fundraising in Texas with his “Beers with Beto” events, handily won the Democratic primary. Twitter Paige Megyesihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paige-megyesi/ Linkedin $400 million to help improve Fort Worth over the next 5 years He received 60.65 percent of the Democratic vote Tuesday and will be challenging the incumbent Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who received 82.6 percent of the Republican vote.Two local Fort Worth residents, Shawn and Elaine Tubre, said they were very excited about O’Rourke’s chances in the November midterm“Beto O’Rourke has the best chance now, more than he’s ever had,” Shawn said.  “Our fingers our crossed for 2018.”For longtime resident and TCU Alumnus Jeff Boggess, it was more about not Cruz than excitement for O’Rourke.“Mr. Cruz did not get my vote today,” Boggess said. “To quote the former speaker of the House of Representatives, ‘Mr. Cruz is Satan in the flesh.’ It doesn’t get more succinct then that!”Cruz is already in campaign mode taking an opening shot against O’Rourke in his new radio ad which features the song “If you’re gonna run in Texas” and takes a shot at O’Rourke’s nickname Beto, which is short for Robert. (And if this is just the opening, well we’re sure excited to see how this campaign shapes up.)Now Midterm elections aren’t until November, where the U.S. House and one-third of the U.S. Senate will go up for election, but Democrats are likely happy to see the rise in their parties turnout for this primary as an indicator of what’s to come across the country. Linkedin ReddIt + posts Griffin Conboy and Kayley Ryan contributed to this report. Paige Megyesihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paige-megyesi/ Facebook What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit center_img ReddIt Previous articleNo. 7 TCU baseball win 7-2 in Schlossnagle’s 700th career victoryNext articleListen: Ball Don’t Lie Ep. One: A New Era Paige Megyesi RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU student lobbies Texas congressional delegation for foreign aid Paige Megyesi is a theatre and journalism double major at Texas Christian University, class of 2019. She is from a small town in eastern Texas, but Fort Worth feels like home. With the little free time she has, she loves to spend her time relaxing in Sherley Hall with her residents and fellow staff members. Bipartisan house group proposes latest plan for DACA reform as deadline moves closer Facebook Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines Paige Megyesi Primary election shows surge in voters for Democratic candidates “Pirates of the Caribbean,” one of the most popular movies today, may have taken the world by storm, but there’s another kind of pirating that has everyone from college students to studio executives scrambling to their lawyers.Instead of flashy jewelry, gaudy clothes and an eye patch to match, the weapons of choice for today’s pirates are a laptop and file-sharing program, like Kazaa or LimeWire. Peer-to-peer file sharing has become wildly popular since the first days of Napster. Twitter Paige Megyesihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paige-megyesi/last_img read more

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Arsenal goalkeeper Bernd Leno backs Harry Kane over ‘dive’ in north London derby: ‘That is normal in this game’

first_imgAdvertisement Arsenal goalkeeper Bernd Leno backs Harry Kane over ‘dive’ in north London derby: ‘That is normal in this game’ Comment Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 4 Sep 2019 3:55 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy linkcenter_img Advertisement Sokratis Papastathopoulos and Harry Kane collided late in the north London derby (Picture: Getty Images)Arsenal goalkeeper Bernd Leno has chimed in on the debate over whether Harry Kane dived late on in the north London derby, but has surprisingly sat on the fence over the Tottenham striker’s actions.Kane went down in the closing stages of the match at the Emirates after contact from Sokratis Papastathopoulos, but it appeared that the England captain had initiated the impact himself.The incident has led to Gunners legend Ian Wright labeling Kane a ‘cheat’ and Jose Mourinho agreeing that it was not a penalty.However, Leno would not go as far as accusing Kane of diving, telling the official Arsenal website: ‘I don’t know, I think from Kane and also from Sokratis it was maybe over-reacting from both but that is normal in this game.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘Everybody was going crazy in the last minutes, all the fans and players were crazy and the referee made the right decision, he just said that everyone should calm down so it was okay.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityKane was asked about the clash after the game as he watched it back on a replay and he believes it was only not given because it was in the penalty box.‘He makes a tired tackle, I think on the half-way line I get it, when you’re in the box it’s kind of 50-50,’ Kane told Sky Sports.‘The ref probably thinks I’m looking for it, but all I’m trying to do is shield the ball. It is what it is, it could be given in some games, it weren’t today.’Kane was involved in a similar situation against Newcastle a week earlier when Jamal Lascelles appeared to bring him down in the box but no penalty was given.Former Scotland international Craig Burley believes that Kane dived on both occasions and feels that he is given preferential treatment in the media as the England captain.‘Well in my opinion he’s dived twice in the last two weeks,’ Burley told ESPN FC.‘You can say ‘well he’s drawn contact and he’s clever’ but I’m not going to give it a swerve because he’s the darling of the English media and the English captain. He’s thrown himself to the ground the last two weeks.‘If that was Johnny Foreigner years ago, as were all reminded of, then “we don’t want that kind of thing in the British game, we don’t do that”.‘Well you do, and he does. The English captain’s a diver, there you go, that’s all you need to know. The England captain’s a diver.’MORE: Arsenal legend Ray Parlour defends Granit Xhaka after Tottenham drawMORE: Dani Ceballos’ class reaction as Alexandre Lacazette scores for Arsenal against Tottenhamlast_img read more

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Hawks shutout Leafs 5-0 to open Murdoch Semi Final on fire

first_imgIt was not the start to the playoffs the Nelson Leafs players wanted.Allan Pruss scored twice to lead the Beaver Valley Nitehawks to a 5-0 trashing of the Leafs in Game one of the Murdoch Division Semi Final Friday in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action in Fruitvale.Game two is Saturday back at the Hawks’ Nest.Pruss, who finished the game with three points, scored twice in the third period to put the game away for the home side. Sam Swanson and Jace Weegar scored in the first and second periods, respectively, to give the Hawks a 2-0 advantage after 40 minutes.Taylor Stafford scored a shorthanded marker late in the game to complete the scoring.Drake Poirier stopped all 22 shots to register the shutout.Nelson struggled to muster any offence during the game, registering only five shots in the second period.Dylan Williamson, back from an injury, was Nelson’s game star while Poirier was named player-of-the-game for Beaver Valley.The series shifts to Nelson for Game three and four, Monday and Tuesday.Puck drop is 7 p.m.Beaver Valley has eliminated Nelson from post season play in three of the past four seasons.last_img read more

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Fossils by Faith

first_imgFossils are real artifacts you can hold in your hand.  The stories behind them are not.  How does science connect the one with the other?  Sometimes, it requires faith in incredible stories.Stay, sis:  Darwin portrayed a world in flux, with natural selection continually sifting and amplifying minute changes over time.  Why, then did Science Daily title an article, “Rare Insect Fossil Reveals 100 Million Years of Evolutionary Stasis”?  Sure enough, the article claims that a certain splay-footed cricket in rock alleged to be 100 million years old “has undergone very little evolutionary change since the Early Cretaceous Period, a time of dinosaurs just before the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana.”  But is a phrase like evolutionary stasis an explanation, or just a term providing protection from falsification?Goldilocks and the 3 Dinos:  According to PhysOrg, computer models show that dinosaurs can only leave footprints in strata that are “just right” for the mass of the animal.  “Now we can use this ‘Goldilocks’ effect as a baseline for exploring more complicated factors such as the way dinosaurs moved their legs, or what happens to tracks when a mud is drying out.”  But even if the model allows the scientist to tweak all the parameters in a computer, what happened to good old-fashioned field experiments?Titanoceratops the granddaddy:  Analysis of a partial skeleton from New Mexico “could be the new granddaddy of horned dinosaurs,” National Geographic News teased.  It’s a big one, the biggest horned dinosaur found in North America, dated at 74 million years old, but hold on; they gave this bone a new name when they are not sure it isn’t a member of a previously-identified species called Pentaceratops.  No sooner was it given a titanic name but paleontologists were describing its Darwinian pedigree: “If indeed a new species, Titanoceratops’ discovery could also mean that triceratopsins—members of a family of giant horned dinosaurs—evolved their gigantic sizes evolved [sic] at least five million years earlier than previously thought, the study says.”    It’s not clear why this specimen had anything to do with ancestry.  Does the smaller evolve from the larger?  Sometimes, perhaps, but clearly, much of Darwin’s story had to get things bigger than the last universal common ancestor, a cell.  A Yale paleontologist remarked, “It’s pretty surprising—I would have not have thought something this big and this advanced was living in this time period.”  But have faith: “I would like it to be real,” a paleontologist at Cleveland Natural History Museum said, struggling with his doubts.  Another brother helped his unbelief: “After all, Triceratops must have had ancestors in this earlier time, and this individual does show specialized traits that we see in the Triceratops complex.”If paleontologists unfamiliar with the consensus views on age, origin, ancestry and evolutionary mechanisms were to examine these fossils, it’s interesting to consider what stories they might come up with. Pardon, your assumptions are showing.  Did you catch the slips?  The specimen must have ancestors during this earlier time – says who?  Darwin, that’s who.  The evidence may not show it, and claiming it may require willing suspension of disbelief, but the Bearded Buddha asks for unfeigned faith.  But then why not apply the same faith to Titanoceratops (if such a species even existed) that was applied to the splay-footed cricket, saying it showed “incredible stasis” for 100 million years?    Evolutionists have come up with the perfect crime.  No evidence will ever convict Darwin, because he bought out the police, the researchers, the politicians, the teachers, and the judges.  Will any magistrate in his totalitarian regime ever pay attention to a citizen’s arrest of these scientist impersonators? (see 09/30/2007 commentary).  If the foundations be destroyed, what can the righteous do?  Tell the unvarnished truth to whoever will listen, that’s what.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Exoplanets Are Young, Too

first_imgObservations cause a major upset in planet formation theory, and the time needed for evolution.Two days ago, we reported the evidence for youth in Saturn’s rings and moons (19 Dec 2018). A new report from Science Magazine extends this youth out to the planets around other stars. Daniel Clery, in his article “Hints of young planets puzzle theorists,” gives observational evidence that the long-standing “core accretion” model for planet formation is wrong. At least 20 exoplanets have dust disks that can’t be as old as expected. Keep in mind that planetary scientists still make ‘reckless drafts on the bank of time’ (2 July 2007) as do the geologists, tossing around millions and billions of years like politicians with OPM (other people’s money). In this quote, Clery sounds like a politician realizing there’s not enough revenue for his favorite program.HL Tau, a mere stripling of a star no more than 1 million years old, was swaddled in a surprise. Four years ago, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile revealed gaps in a bright disk of dust around HL Tau—apparently swept clean by unseen planets that had formed millions of years earlier than astronomers thought possible. But now, an ALMA survey of 20 disks around nearby young stars suggests the precocious planets around HL Tau are no anomalies—a result that will keep theorists busy for years.There aren’t enough cloths to swaddle the baby. How big a surprise is this? Clery quotes an astronomer:“It’s spectacular,” says Joshua Winn of Princeton University. “We will never think about disks in the same way.”The findings appear to falsify the favored core accretion theory. “The process is expected to be slow, taking millions of years to play out.” These exoplanets are too young for that. Many of the cleared lanes are farther out than Neptune is from the sun, Clery says, adding to the problem, because there should be a paucity of dust at those distances.Planetary Science: the myth that dust bunnies turn into real bunnies, given billions of years.The evidence takes away support for core accretion theory and hands it to the “heretical” theory called disk instability. How fast is that process?An alternative model relying on unstable ripples or clumps in the disk that collapse under their own gravity can make planets faster, especially large ones in distant orbits. But Marco Tazzari, of the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, notes that the survey found few spiral arms—signs of disk instabilities—in the disks. “There are many structures we cannot account for,” he says.The astronomers only see the lanes cleared of dust, not any planets themselves. Their proposed solution? Futureware. “To untangle these issues, astronomers need additional observations,” Clery writes. At least they are looking now, instead of just modeling. Clery’s article illustrates the latest revision of Murphy’s Law: “Anything that can go wrong has already gone wrong.” Scientists are just finding it with the ALMA Telescope. It also illustrates H. L. Mencken’s conjecture, “For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong.”Both theories, therefore, don’t seem to work. And what about the rocky, inner planets? Disk instability is not as helpful in those cases.Ashes to Ashes and Dust to DustAt New Scientist, Leah Crane demoted our planet by saying, “Earth may be made up of rocks blasted by gusts of solar wind.” Don’t you feel better now? Our response should be, “If you say it MAY be, it also MAY NOT be. How do you know?” She sings the old Bob Dylan ballad, “The answer, my friend, is…’The solar wind consists of ions, not rocks.Earth may have started as dust in the wind. Unlike in many other stellar systems we’ve seen, the area close to our sun is empty. That may be because early in the solar system’s formation, the solar wind blew rocks near the sun into the area where Mercury, Venus, and Earth eventually formed.That’s odd; we know a lot about the solar wind, and our sun isn’t blowing chunks these days. For cover, Crane runs to Christopher Spalding at Yale University, who has a “simulation.” If you start with the right size pebbles, he says, and if the sun was more active in the past, and if Jupiter contributed its gravity – then rocks 100 meters and smaller “may have acted as building blocks for these rocky worlds.” They “may have,” he says, but he’s cheating. Getting dust to grow into pebbles by accretion is one of the big hurdles in planet formation theories (28 June 2018). At least the ALMA team had observations, not just simulations.Readers, please realize that secular astronomers believed the core accretion model for decades. And before that, textbooks routinely taught the planetesimal hypothesis. And centuries before that Laplace presented the nebular hypothesis, for which he famously told Napoleon it had no need of God. Well, now we have telescopes that fail to confirm it, and the recent “alternative hypothesis” of disk instability isn’t looking too good, either. Let’s put the findings together in a logical way. If exoplanets form quickly, then Saturn formed quickly. If Saturn’s rings and moons are young, then Saturn is young. If Saturn is young, the solar system is young. If the earth is young, then Charlie & Charlie* were wrong; life must have been created. Tell me, theistic evolutionists, why you feel so compelled to abandon Genesis and desire the company of people who keep turning out to be wrong? Don’t you believe Psalm 119:99? “I have more understanding than all my teachers, for Your testimonies are my meditation.”*Lyell, Darwin.Recommended resources: Michael Denton is neither a Christian nor a creationist, but his recent books The Wonder of Water (see the video), and Children of Light (hear his podcast) make a compelling case that our universe, our star, and our planet were intended for beings like us. Isaiah said as much long ago. “For thus says the Lord, Who created the heavens, Who is God, Who formed the earth and made it, Who has established it, Who did not create it in vain [i.e., by random forces or the Stuff Happens Law], Who formed it to be inhabited: “I am the Lord, and there is no other” (Isaiah 45:18).For your amusement, here are some Murphy’s Laws that seem appropriate to the story:If there is a possibility of several things going wrong, the one that will cause the most damage will be the one to go wrong.If you perceive that there are four possible ways in which something can go wrong, and circumvent these, then a fifth way, unprepared for, will promptly develop.If anything simply cannot go wrong, it will anyway.Whether things can go wrong or not, it depends on your frame of reference. Regardless of your frame of reference, things will go wrong anyway.Two wrongs don’t make a right. It usually takes three or four.If your action has a 50% possibility of being correct, you will be wrong 75% of the time.Anything that can’t possibly in a million years go wrong, will go wrong.The probability that something can go wrong is directly proportional to the square of the amount of inconvenience it can cause you.The only time something’s right is when everyone agrees its wrong. (Visited 594 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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A chat with Hardin Co. farmer Shane Kellogg on his pulling truck ‘Trump’

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest While at a field day at Kellogg Farms near Forest in Hardin County, Dale Minyo had the treat of talking with renowned super stock diesel pulling champion Shane Kellogg and his impressive truck ‘Trump.’He talks with Kellogg about the sport, its fuel, its name, and much more in this video.last_img

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Shock And Awe: Apple Legend Guy Kawasaki Has Become A Hardcore Android Fan

first_imgdan lyons Tags:#Android#Apple#Guy Kawasaki The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts I was preparing for our Wednesday night ReadWrite Mix event with Guy Kawasaki by reading his latest book, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur — How to Publish a Book, when I came across something strange — an offhand remark about how “real men use Android.”This struck me as odd, because Kawasaki is probably best known as a former Apple evangelist, a relentless promoter whose work in the 1980s helped create what’s known today as the cult of Mac.It’s especially weird because in the world of Apple fanboys there is no greater evil than Google’s Android operating system. The late Steve Jobs vowed to wage “thermonuclear war” against Android, which he considered a ripoff of Apple’s ideas.Apple’s snobby fanbloggers sneer at Android as an ugly, stupid, low-class knockoff used only by people who have no taste or who can’t afford Apple products.But guess what? Kawasaki really is a passionate Android fan.Think Different — Think AndroidKawasaki switched to Android about a year ago and today uses no Apple mobile products. “People are kind of amazed, but I don’t use any iOS products, none at all,” he says. “I fell in love with Android on the smartphone, and then I got a Nexus 7 and started using Android on the tablet as well. To me the great irony is that Apple’s slogan was `Think Different,’ but today if you think different you’re looking at Android.”Kawasaki likes the 7-inch Nexus tablet size and wasn’t tempted to switch to an iPad Mini when Apple finally came out with it in October. “If there was something compelling about the Mini I would switch in a second, but what’s compelling? Why switch?” he says.Kawasaki switched to an Android phone so that he could get on a 4G LTE network. “Apple touts itself as the leading edge of smartphones, so why was it still running on a network that was 10 to 20 times slower?”With the iPhone 5, Apple finally has come out with support for 4G LTE networks, but Kawasaki says he’s not going back. “I won’t switch now, because I think Android is better,” he says.What’s In Your Pocket?His first Android phone was a Motorola Droid Razr Maxx, but he’s now using a Samsung Galaxy S3.What does he like about Android? Things like support for NFC (near field communication), true multitasking and the ability to see all of his apps in alphabetical order.“Another thing I like with Android is they don’t have some stupid proprietary cable. I can go to any hotel front desk and if I’ve forgotten my cable they always have a micro-USB around. I can use my Nexus 7 and it’s on the same cable as my Samsung Galaxy S3. What a concept! A standard cable,” Kawasaki says.Full disclosure: Kawasaki has done some work with Samsung, and the Korean company helped sponsor his last book, What The Plus!: Google+ for the Rest of Us.But he insists that is not what caused him to switch allegiance to Android. After all, he can buy any phone or tablet he wants. He’s not using Android because it’s cheaper, or because he gets demo units for free. He’s not getting paid to use Android or to promote Android in the press.He simply, honestly, likes Android better.Three Out Of Four Smartphone Buyers AgreeHe’s not alone. Android now has 75% market share in smartphones, and is quickly gobbling up share in tablets as well. Apple fans can sneer all they want.The funny thing is that in the past few years I’ve made a similar journey from iPhone to Android. Just like Kawasaki, I’m now on a Samsung Galaxy S3, and before that I was using a Motorola Razr Maxx.Strangest of all, you know who recommended the Razr Maxx to me? Steve Wozniak, aka Woz, the co-founder of Apple and king of Apple fanboys. Woz says he still prefers his iPhone but as you can see below, he is also a bit of an Android fan.center_img What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img
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10 months agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer: Angel Gomes deserved chance

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd boss Solskjaer: Angel Gomes deserved chanceby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer says Angel Gomes deserved his chance last week.Gomes featured in victory over Huddersfield.Solskjaer said, “It sends a signal to the boys that ‘you are close’, because they are. “They’ve done really well in training. When you get the chance to put a player out there for 15 minutes at Old Trafford to give him that experience, Angel was, of course, the one I wanted to put on. And we probably would have still done it if we’d needed a goal, as well, because he’s that sharp.” last_img

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